Beer In Ads #1329: Did Christopher Columbus Discover Beer In America?


Tuesday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
Did Christopher Columbus discover beer in America?

A
Yes, in 1502, he found it brewed by the natives of Central America.

I confess I missed this part of Columbus’ legacy, but according to the ad he reported that “Central American Indians made a brew … ‘of maize, resembling English beer.’”

USBF-1951-qa12

Beer Birthday: Jesse Friedman

Almanac-circle
Today is also the birthday of Jesse Friedman, co-founder of Almanac Beer Co.. I first got to know Jesse when he was writing his beer and food blog, Beer & Nosh, but he’s since gone on to partner with Damian Fagan to create “Farm-to-Barrel” beers in 2010. They currently make three year-round beers and a plethora of individual seasonals under the “Farm to Barrel Series” umbrella, usually with local ingredients, often fruit or field. Join me in wishing jesse a very happy birthday.

Friedman-1
Jesse with Tim Clifford at the SF Beer Week Opening Gala earlier this year.

Friedman-2
Jesse, with Fraggle and Ron Silberstein, from Thirsty Bear, at the Anchor Holiday Party in 2012.

toropaxdinner09-11
Helping Sean Paxton with the Toronado Belgian Beer Lunch in 2009.

Friedman-4
Steve Altamari, Zak Davis, Jesse and Pete Slosberg at Jesse’s Pre-Wedding BBQ in 2010.
[Note: Pictures 1, 2, and 4 purloined from Facebook]

Beer Birthday: Alan Atha

Baeltane
Today is the 64th birthday of Alan Atha, co-founder and brewmaster of Baeltane Brewing in my former hometown of Novato, California. I first met Alan when he was a nanobrewery in planning, and he’s taken the experimental spirit of homebrewing and transitioned beautifully to commercial brewing, while retaining the playful nature that makes so many of his beer’s interesting, and delicious, with names like The Frog That Ate the World Double IPA and Rumplestiltskin. Join me in wishing Alan a very happy birthday.

Atha-1
Alan and his wife Cathy at the brewery.

Atha-2
Joe Tucker, me and Alan at the Craft Beerd book release party in Petaluma.
[Note: photos purloined from Facebook]

Beer In Ads #1328: What Products, Besides Beer, Come From The Brewing Industry?


Monday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What products, besides beer, come from the Brewing Industry?

A
Vitamins, yeast and cattle feeds are important industry by-products.

Apparently brewing yeast is the best source of B vitamins every found, and it even may have rid the world of pellagra, “the dread diet-deficiency disease” that I’ve never heard of, although it persists in Africa, Indonesia, North Korea and China. Then there’s also spent grain given as feed for livestock, as common then as now.

USBF-1951-qa11

Beer In Ads #1327: How Does The Brewing Industry Compare In Size To Other Industries?


Sunday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
How does the Brewing Industry compare in size to other industries?

A
It ranks eleventh* … with a dollar volume two-thirds that of the passenger-car industry in 1949.

The ad claims in 1951 there were “400 and more” breweries, characterized as most “small breweries” and it was the 11th biggest industry. Today we have over 3,000 mostly small breweries, and the total beer market is around $100 billion, as compared to $4.5 billion in 1949. But that doesn’t even put the brewing industry in the top twenty, at least according to a list I found on Wikipedia of “Industries by GDP value added 2011.” They also mentioned that their market was about 5 times larger than the “entire soft-drink industry,” which would have made soda less than $1 billion in 1949. Today, at least according to one source I found (Reportlinker) that the U.S. soft-drink industry was nearly $125 billion, making it larger today than beer (assuming the two figures are comparable). Though that doesn’t really surprise me, with soda being so ubiquitous in our society.

USBF-1951-qa10

With Next Session, Say “I Made This”

session-the
For our 92nd Session, our host is Jeremy Short, who writes Pintwell, along with Chris Jensen. For his topic, he’s chosen I Made This. When Jeremy first offered to host this session, his topic was “Homebrewing and How Homebrewing Impacts Your Relationship with Beer,” which he’s now markedly simplified down to it’s essence, the joy which every homebrewer feels as he or she takes their first sip of their homebrew: I Made This! But even if you’ve never homebrewed, or have not intention of ever doing so, he’s included a way for everybody to participate:

For the homebrewer:

- How did homebrewing change your view of beer? Do you like beers now that you didn’t before? Do you taste beer differently? Does homebrewing turn you into a pretentious asshole?

For the I only homebrewed once crowd:

- What was the experience like? Did you enjoy it? Hate it? Did you think about beer differently afterwards.

For the I have never homebrewed crowd:

- Maybe you had an experience at a brewery you would like to share? Maybe your toured a brewery and learned and experienced the making of beer that impacted the way you think of beer? Or maybe you’ve brewed in a professional setting?

For the I hate homebrewing crowd:

- Why? Why do you hate us so?

So there’s really no excuse for not participating.

Homebrewing

So put on your DIY cap and write about your relationship to homebrewing next Friday, October 3. To contribute, leave a comment at the announcement or send Jeremy an email: jeremy (a) pintwell (.) com.

ask-me-homebrew

Beer In Ads #1326: What Famed Scientist Is Closely Linked To The Brewing Of Beer?


Saturday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What famed scientist is closely linked to the brewing of beer?

A
Louis Pasteur, who evolved “pasteurization” through observing the action of yeast.

The ad details pasteur’s important work, “Studies on Beer,” published in 1876.

USBF-1951-qa9

Russian River Brewing To Get New Brewhouse

russian-river
Well this is great news for Russian River beer lovers. I got the news last night that the Santa Rosa brewery will be getting some key new brewing equipment, installing a new brewhouse to replace the current one. The last brewhouse was installed in 2008, when they built their production brewery, increasing annual production from 3,000 barrels to 14,000 barrels, a 466% increase. In February of next year, they’ll be swapping out the old one to install a 4 vessel 50-barrel brew house from AAA Metal Fabrication in Oregon. So how to make beer while the new kettles are being installed? Here’s how, from the press release:

Since this is an equipment swap, there will be no way to brew at their production brewery for about a month. This will not only affect beer sales at their pub, but wholesale distribution since all packaged beer is brewed at this facility (Pliny fans should be gasping right about now). Alas, have no fear! Vinnie and Natalie’s good friends at Firestone Walker Brewing Company have graciously offered to brew several batches of Pliny the Elder to keep the beer flowing during this downtime at Russian River! Firestone Walker will brew Pliny the Elder for draft distribution only, and bottled Pliny will continue to come from Russian River through existing inventory in their fermenters. Vinnie will be working closely with Brewmaster Matt Brynildson to dial in the Pliny recipe in an effort to maintain flavor consistency. If you are at all familiar with the Firestone beers, you know their brewing practices and quality are already first class!

Vinnie and Natalie are grateful to their friends at Firestone Walker for helping them out during installation of the new brew house in February. It’s not exactly like borrowing a bag of malt! The ability to have an uninterrupted supply of draft Pliny the Elder for their wholesale partners and, especially, consumers is invaluable to them and the brewery. This is a true testament to the continued collaborative spirit and friendly nature of the Craft Beer Industry.

No word on when the swap is expected to be completed but the new shiny brewhouse will allow them to keep making great beer.

P1070500
Here’s the Russian River crew in front of the old system, shortly after it was installed in 2008. As noted in the press release, Vinnie and Natalie bought it from Dogfish Head, but Sam Calagione in turn got it from Henry Ortlieb, a fourth generation brewer in the Ortlieb family, who as you can see, had it built in 1997 when he opened Poor Henry’s Brewery and Pub.

P1070515

Beer In Ads #1325: What Great Americans Favored Beer As A Beverage Of Moderation?


Friday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What great Americans favored beer as a beverage of moderation?

A
Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Patrick Henry — to name just a few.

This ad details a few of the founding fathers’ relationship with beer, and also mentions Samuel Adams, in addition to the four listed in the headline answer.

USBF-1951-qa8

Goodnight Brew

goodnight-moon
Oh, how I wish I had this book when my kids were younger. I read the classic Goodnight Moon so many times that I had it memorized and didn’t even need the book to read it to them. But if I strayed from the text — which, I confess, I enjoyed doing just to mess with them — they’d invariably correct me, as they knew the story inside and out, as well. But now author Ann E. Briated (not her real name; it’s actually Aldo Zelnick) has written a beer-soaked parody of the children’s classic and re-tapped it as Goodnight Brew. It’s written for adults, with tongues firmly in cheeks, as part of their “pitcher book for grown-ups” series. The publisher’s website describes it with this introduction:

It’s closing time at the brewery. While the moon rises, the happy brewery crew—including three little otters (in charge of the water), a wort hog, and a hops wildebeest— sing and dance as they wind down for the day. Join them in saying goodnight to the brew kettle, barley and yeast, hops and mash, saison, porter, IPA, and much more.

Befuddled about beer ingredients? Puzzled about the brew process? Can’t remember the difference between an ale and a lager? Don’t miss the brew infographics that follow the story!

This humorous parody of a children’s literature classic is a “pitcher book” for grown-ups. It’s a besotted bedtime story for beer lovers everywhere!

goodnight-brew

Even though my kids are too old for it now, I ordered one anyway. I am hoping someday to have grandchildren, and I should be prepared.

gb-ipa

It’s wonderfully illustrated by Allie Ogg. and here are a few pages from the book.

gb-chicken