Beer In Ads #756: Otto Von Bismarck For Budweiser


Tuesday’s ad is another old one for Budweiser, also from 1908. The black and white ad is text-heavy and includes a history lesson on Otto von Bismarck, though I doubt the ad would have run after World War I. This was just a few years before anti-German sentiment peaked because of the war, and so many of the successful breweries in America were started by German immigrants, and Anheuser-Busch was no exception. But they loved him. “Like all Germans he believed in good eating and drinking, hence the juices of malt and hops were never absent from his table.”

Bud-1908-Bismarck

Under the Anheuser Bush

music
Another historical oddity, Under the Anheuser Bush, was a song written around 1903, with words by Andrew B. Sterling and music by Harry Von Tilzer. This version is sung by Billy Murray and is a 1903 Old Edison Recording.

anheuser-busch-song-1904

Here’s the lyrics:

Talk about the shade of the sheltering palms
Praise the bamboo tree and it’s wide spreading charms
There’s a little bush that grows right here in town
You know it’s name it has won such renown
Often with my sweetheart just after the play
To this little place then my footsteps will stray
If she hesitates when she looks at the sign
Softly I whisper, “Now Sue, don’t decline….”

Rave about the place where you swells go to dine
Picture you and me with our sandwich and stein
Underneath the bush where the good fellows meet
Life seems worth living, our joy is complete
If you’re sad at heart take a trip there tonight
You’ll forget your woe and your eyes will grow bright.
There you’ll surely find me with my sweetheart, Sue.
Come down this evening, I’ll introduce you.

Come, come, come and make eyes with me
Under the Anheuser Bush
Come come drink some Budwise with me
Under the Anheuser Bush
Hear the old German Band
Just let me hold your hand YAH!
Do, do come and have a stein or two
Under the Anheuser Bush!

Here’s Verse 1:

And Verse 2:

Under-the-Anheuser-Bush

Below is yet another version, a little more scratchy than the other one, but is also sung by Billy Murray. It was recorded in Philadelphia on January 15, 1904 and is Take 4. I found it at the National Jukebox at the Library of Congress.

This one was recorded on vinyl by Monarch Records.

dlc_victor_2639_01_b888_04