Patent No. 1718910A: Process Of Manufacturing Yeast

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Today in 1929, US Patent 1718910 A was issued, an invention of Lucien Lavedan, for his “Process of Manufacturing Yeast.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The primary object of my invention is to provide a process in which carbon dioxide is employed to more effectively carry out in the most suitable and efficient manner, the’ continuous process of making yeast with continuous aeration in propagating pure yeast in a pure sugared liquid of a given density in the presence of nutritive salts and air; with the separation of the scum containing the yeast thus propagated Jfrom the main body of the liquid, and subsequent separation of the yeast cells from the associated liquid o the scum, with the addition of sufficient sugared solution to the separated liquid to bring the main sugared solution to its original density when the separated liquid is returned to it, as described in my Letters Patent- No. 1,201,062, on a continuous process with continuous aeration, granted October 10, 1916, the cold carbon dioxide acting as a suitable agent to neutralize an excess of alkalinity, and at the same time operating to reduce the temperature of the Wort.

Another object of`my invention is to provide a process to produce from a given amount of raw materials, the highest possible yield of yeast possessing an increased vitality and strength for baking, fermenting, diet and any other uses, while simultaneously decreasing the production of alcohol.

A further object of my invention is to produce yeast which will keep for a longer period of time than yeast produced by other processes and methods.

A further object of my invention is to produce yeast possessing a higher vitamin E and nutrient value, and far more suitable to be used for eating purposes as it is more adapted to conditions existing in the human stomach, more palatable and of better odor and taste, and possesses a more effective action than any other yeast produced by other processes and methods.

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Patent No. 2005770A: Hop Extractor

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Today in 1935, US Patent 2005770 A was issued, an invention of Daniel C. Bleser, for his “Hop Extractor.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to improvements in hop extracting and has for its main object the provision of a method and apparatus whereby the desirable flavoring and other elements of hops may be extracted: therefrom without also extracting certain rank, bitter principals which are undesirable and objectionable, It is also an object of this invention to provide an improved means for extracting hops which will require less time than the conventional practices now used.

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Patent No. 1767646A: Process For Manufacturing Yeast

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Today in 1930, US Patent 1767646 A was issued, an invention of George S. Bratton, assigned to Anheuser-Busch, for his “Process For Manufacturing Yeast.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to the manufacture of yeast, and particularly, to processes of the kind which contemplate initiating propagation of yeast in a dilute Wort, and thereafter adding or feeding into same a highly concentrated Wort .that contains yeast nourishing materials.

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Patent No. 1065666A: Cooler For Liquid-Dispensing Apparatus

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Today in 1913, US Patent 1065666 A was issued, an invention of Albert Dade, for his “Cooler For Liquid-Dispensing Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to liquid dispensing apparatus, and it more particularly relates to apparatus for dispensing beverages.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved cooler for beverage dispensing apparatus ada ted to be secured onto a beer reg or barre for drawing beer therefrom.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a device of this character which may be quickly and easily knocked down and set up and thereby made especially adaptable dispensing beverages at picnics and the like.

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Patent No. 216884A: Improvement In Apparatus For Refrigerating Air For Cooling Beer

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Today in 1879, US Patent 216884 A was issued, an invention of Franz Pallausoh, for his “Improvement in Apparatus For Refrigerating Air For Cooling Beer and Other Liquids.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

My invention consists of a vessel fitted inwardly with strips or plates covered with coarse weavings or other material of great capillary power, maintained in a moist state, and arranged in irregular or zig zag lines, in combination with means for forcing a current of air or any other suitable gas through said vessel, the cooling apparatus being located in an ice-box, and the current of air not coming in contact with the ice, all as more particularly hereinafter described, and whereby the ice melts but slowly, and evaporation is actively maintained. The liquid caused to evaporate may be water, ether, alcohol, or any other volatile substance, or a mixture of such substances.

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Patent No. 2643016A: Carton Taping Apparatus And Method

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Today in 1953, US Patent 2643016 A was issued, an invention of Charles W. Steckling, assigned to the Schlitz Brewing Co., for their “Carton Taping Apparatus and Method.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

This invention relates to an improved apparatus and method for sealing with adhesive ‘tape cartons and containers made of corrugated paper board and the like having longitudinally extending closing flaps which meet across the top of the carton.

A primary object of the invention is to apply-a strip of adhesive tape to cartons moving in line in uniformly spaced relationship.

Another object of the invention is to cut the tape between cartons and press down the ends as the cartons continuously move forward in such fashion as to maintain the tape under tension until an adhesive bond is established.

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Patent No. 562414A: Bung For Beer Barrels

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Today in 1896, US Patent 562414A was issued, an invention of Jeremiah J. O’Leary and Patrick T. O’Leary, for their “Bung For Beer Barrels.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

Our invention relates to bungs in the heads of beer barrels or hogsheads, which are adapted to receive a coupling fora pipe, through which the beer passes to one or more faucets, from whence it is drawn.

Our invention consists in the improved construction of the bung proper, and also of the coupling which enters said bung for the purpose of making a pipe connection, as will be hereinafter fully described, and the nature thereof indicated by the claims.

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Patent No. 1100818A: Bottle Cap Remover

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Today in 1914, US Patent 1100818 A was issued, an invention of Robert O. Boardman, for his “Bottle Cap Remover.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

This invention relates to bottle closures. and .more particularly to a device for removing the cap closures from beer bottles, and the like. As is well-known. such cap closures are ordinarily removed by the use of an implement entirely separate and distinct from the cap. Such opening devices are liable to be lost and misplaced, and even, when at hand must be applied to the cap prior to manipulation to pry the cap from it has been proposed to provide, as a substitute for such opening devices, a cap having an integral tongue designed to be grasped by the fingers and pulled to remove the cap, or to provide a cap constructed in sections, arranged to be separated to such an extent as to permit of removal of the cap without the use of the ordinary opener. Such caps, however, present the disadvantage that a special machine is necessary for their manufacture and usually they are not so constructed as to permit of the use of the ordinary capping machine. Furthermore, they are expensive to manufacture and can usually only be manipulated by a person capable of exerting a strong grip.

In connection with the foregoing it is the object of the present invention to provide a bottle cap opener so constructed that it may be readily assembled with the ordinary bottle cap at the time of placing the latter upon the bottle to be sealed, and may be readily and quickly manipulated by anyone for the purpose of prying oil the cap.

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Patent No. 3586514A: Thin-Walled Plastic Container For Beer

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3586514 A was issued, an invention of Taco Vijlbrief, assigned to Heineken Tech Beheer NV, for his “Thin-Walled Plastic Container For Beer.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, it has been found that a thin-walled container specially suitable for beer and other oxygen-sensitive materials is obtained by having a hard polymer or copolymer of vinyl chloride containing such a quantity of anti-oxidizing agent that the oxygen permeability of this hard polymer or copolymer, measured as the number of cm. of oxygen of standard temperature and pressure which has passed through 1 cm. of the plastic through a thickness of 1 mm, per second, per cm. of oxygen overpressure at 20 C. (mercury), amounts to about 10- cm. (STP)mm./cm. sec., cm. Hg or lower.

By thin-walled throughout the specification and claims is understood that the thickness of the wall does not exceed 2.5 millimeters. Thicker walls present working difficulties and moreover, the problem of undesired oxygen permeation through the wall is felt only if the wall is thin.

HeinekenPETLondon2012Bottle
A modern PET Heineken bottle.

Patent No. 243297A: Alcohol Still

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Today in 1881, US Patent 243297 A was issued, an invention of Oliver L. Perin, for his “Alcohol Still.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

My invention is in the nature of an improvement upon a continuous still for the manufacture of alcohol for which Letters Patent were granted myself, Daniel Horan, and Dominick McGoen, July 20, 1880, and has for its object the arrangement of the several elements of the vaporizing-chambers in a novel manner, to be hereinafter described, which is calculated to improve the efficiency of the still, and at the same time will materially cheapen the construction thereof; and it consists in constructing the vaporizing-chamber of the usual rectangular form, and providing a bottom or licor of copper or other suitable material, which shall contain a great number of small perforations. Upon this bottom I erect three (or any odd number more than three) partitions, alternately attached to the opposite end timbers of the chamber. The partitions are made as much shorter than the clear length of the chamber as the width of spaces between the partitions and side timbers of the chamber and between adjacent partitions. At the end of one of the spaces between a partition and its corresponding side timber of the chamber I construct a box or bay with a weir or overflow plate of copper, raised two or three inches above the floor or bottom of the chamber. The partition at the bay is raised higher than the edge of the weir, in order that all beer or mash delivered into the bay shall be compelled to pass over the weir in a thin sheet, and be evenly distributed over the bottom of the chamber as it flows along the next connecting channel. From the next chamber above a down-pipe is’ suspended, which dips into the bay below the level of the Weir-plate sufficiently to form a seal against the steam-pressure in the chamber and prevent the steam ascending to the next chamber above through At the opposite side of the chamber a down-pipe is suspended to dip into the bay of the next lower chamber. The upper end of the down-pipe is raised sufficiently above the floor or bottom of the chamber to which it is attached to maintain a thin sheet ot’ liquid over the perforations in the bottom previously mentioned. The beer or mash flows through the down-pipe into the bay, over the weirplate and down one channel. formed by the partitions previously mentioned, and up the next, and down the next, and so on until it reaches the down-pipe at the opposite side of the chamber, through which it descends to the next chamber below, where the same operation is repeated, the direction of the currents of beer, however, being reversed. Meanwhile the beer or mash, passes over the floor, the steam (introduced first into the lowest chamber but one of the still) and the spirituous vapor ascends from chamber to chamber through the perforations in the bottoms of the chambers, these perforations being of such dimensions that no beer or mash can descend through them against the pressure (usually five or six pounds) in the still. The heat in the steam being transmitted to the beer to expel the spirit, it condenses and works back through the down-pipes to the bottom of the still, where it is drawn oft with the residuals of the beer as slop.

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