Patent No. 2678549A: Beer Cooling And Dispensing Apparatus

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Today in 1954, US Patent 2678549 A was issued, an invention of Alvin N. Bloom and Harold B. Campbell, for their “Beer Cooling and Dispensing Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

This invention relates to beer cooling and dispensing apparatus, and has for its primary purpose the provision of an apparatus of greatly improved and simplified structure, which is compact, portable and rugged, which can be installed very readily and inexpensively, which requires a minimum amount of attention, maintenance and servicing, which operates in a positive, economical, highly efficient and sanitary manner, and which is very flexible in its operation so that greatly varying amounts of beer at the proper temperature may be drawn.

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The Top 20 Most Popular Beers Sold In America

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Despite being primarily a wine site, Vinepair often has some interesting beer content. A few months ago, they created a chart of The 20 Most Popular Beers in America. The rankings are based on IRI data from 2013, which is a little odd since more recent figures are undoubtedly available. But in the top sellers, they don’t change all that often so it’s likely still reasonably accurate.
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In the “Details” below, the twenty beers are listed with a number of pieces of other interesting data, including the number of cases, price per case and their Beer Advocate score.
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Patent No. 7943366B2: Genetically Modified Yeast Species And Fermentation Processes Using Genetically Modified Yeast

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Today in 2011, US Patent 7943366 B2 was issued, an invention of Vineet Rajgarhia, Kari Koivuranta, Merja Penttilä, Marja Ilmen, Pirkko Suominen, Aristos Aristidou, Christopher Kenneth Miller, Stacey Olson, and Laura Ruohonen, assigned to Cargill, for their “Genetically Modified Yeast Species And Fermentation Processes Using Genetically Modified Yeast.” Here’s the Abstract:

Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications’, include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

Below are just three of the forty figures filed with the application. They all look about the same to my untrained eye.

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Patent No. 3251386A: Filler Valve Assembly

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Today in 1966, US Patent 3251386 A was issued, an invention of Frank A. Bellato, for his “Filler Valve Assembly.” There’s no Abstract, but in the description it states that the “invention relates to container filling apparatus, and particularly to what is known as a racker assembly used to fill beer kegs and the like.” But it’s primarily this.

The major object of the invention is to provide a racker assembly by means of whicha beer keg may be quickly and easily filled with a free unobstructed flow, while at the same time a supply of a gas under pressure (such as CO is being introduced into the keg to minimize turbulence and foaming of the beer as delivered into the keg.

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Patent No. 4089444A: Tapping Apparatus For Golden Gate Type Beer Keg Openings

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Today in 1978, US Patent 4089444 A was issued, an invention of Ronald E. Shea, for his “Tapping Apparatus For Golden Gate Type Beer Keg Openings.” Here’s the Abstract:

A beer keg tapping apparatus for golden gate type openings comprising a keg unit consisting of a stepped annular member in which valve controlled gas and liquid passages are disposed and which is adapted for insertion into the beer keg through the golden gate opening, and a stepped annular coupling member which is adapted for slidable disposal over the keg unit and includes first and second external threaded portions for engagement with the keg opening for securing the keg unit therein and with a tavern unit for tapping beer from the keg, respectively.

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Patent No. 625055A: Closure For Sealing Bottles

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Today in 1899, US Patent 625055 A was issued, an invention of William Painter, for his “Closure for Sealing Bottles.” There’s no Abstract, but in the description they describe an “invention [that] relates to closures for sealing bottles; and it is designed to provide for the ready and easy discharge of the contents of the bottle without the removal of the entire closure.” Basically, it’s an improvement to the crown, or bottle cap, that Painter first invented and patented in 1892.

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Patent No. 20080110854A1: Beverage Bottle With Gripping Feature

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Today in 2008, US Patent 20080110854 A1 was issued, an invention of Jason M. Kelly, assigned to Coors Brewing Company, for his “Beverage Bottle With Gripping Feature.” Here’s the Abstract:

A container is provided with integral gripping features. The gripping features are preferably provided in two opposing groups located on opposite sides of the mid-section of the container. The gripping features include a plurality of finger grips that are adapted to conform to the placement of the thumb and fingers when grasping the container. The finger grips are elliptical shaped cavities, and ridges extend between each of the adjacent finger grips.

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Patent No. 4154865A: Method For Processing Hops For Brewing

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Today in 1979, US Patent 4154865 A was issued, an invention of Herbert L. Grant, assigned to S. S. Steiner, Inc., for his “Method for Processing Hops for Brewing.” Here’s the Abstract:

There is provided a method of processing hops or hop extracts for brewing in which hops and particularly the alpha acids in the hops are stabilized against deterioration and light sensitivity, the process broadly comprising isomerizing a substantial portion of the alpha acids in the hops and contacting said iso-alpha acids witha metallic hydride compound, the metal thereof being suitable for use in foods, until the reaction is substantially completed. In another aspect, the alpha acids present in the hops are converted to their reduced isomerized products which are desirable for brewing. The process is especially suitable for use in pelletizing operations.

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Patent No. 2024484B1: Continuous Method For The Production Of A Yeast Fermented Beverage

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Today in 2014, US Patent 2024484 B1 was issued, an invention of Hendrikus Mulder, Onno Cornelis Snip, Douglas John Banks, and Herman Hendrik Jan Bloemen, assigned to Heineken Supply Chain B.V., for their “Continuous Method for the Production of a Yeast Fermented Beverage.” There’s no Abstract, but it’s described as an “invention relat[ing] to a continuous method for the production of a yeast fermented beverage, such as beer. More particularly, the present invention relates to such a continuous method in which a high gravity mash is produced, i.e. a mash with a gravity in excess of 22° Plato.”It’s a fairly complicated application and invention, so you’re best bet is to read the whole thing.
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Patent No. 2001040A: Beer Dispensing Equipment

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Today in 1935, US Patent 2001040 A was issued, an invention of David Sweeney, for his “Beer Dispensing Equipment.” There’s no Abstract, but it’s described as an “invention relat[ing] to beer dispensing equipment, and more particularly to equipment for handling, cooling, and dispensing, beer or other liquids.” And this appears to be the main feature.

One feature of my invention is that it is adapted for easy handling of quantities of liquid up to ten gallons or more. Another feature of my invention is the provision of means for expelling liquid, for example, beer, from a container without exposing the liquid remaining in the container to air. This is especially useful in dispensing beer where one container may be more or less infrequently used. In the ordinary case, for example, if a beer container is partially emptied, and air allowed to enter the container to fill up the space previously occupied by the liquid drawn off, the liquid remaining in the container is likely to become spoiled by contact with the air, especially if not used rather promptly. All these objections are overcome by my inventions I apply an inert gas, for example, carbon dioxide gas, (or some gas which will not spoil the beer or other liquid in the container) to the top of the container under suitable pressure. This gas then serves not only to expel the liquid from the container as it is used, but also fills up the space in the container occupied by the liquid drawn off, so that no spoilage results to the liquid remaining in the container. Still another feature of my invention is the elimination of cooling coils with their tendency to spoil beer standing in them.

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