Patent No. 20120167263P1: Hot Plant Named ‘HBC 366′

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Today in 2012, US Patent 20120167263 P1 was issued, an invention of Jason Perrault and Eugene G. Probasco, assigned to the Hop Breeding Company, L.L.C., for their “Hot Plant Named ‘HBC 366.'” Here’s the Abstract:

A new hop plant named ‘HBC 366’ is disclosed. The cones of ‘HBC 366’ mature in late September, and yield a crop of 2200 to 2700 pounds per acre. ‘HBC 366’ is used for its unique aromatic quality, high alpha acid content and exceptional yield.

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Patent No. PP8812P: Hop Plant Named H87311-3

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Today in 1994, US Patent PP8812 P was issued, an invention of Gene Probasco, assigned to John I. Haas, Inc., for his “Hop Plant Named H87311-3.” Here’s the Abstract:

A new variety of hop plant (H87311-3) originating as the result of a controlled cross pollination between an unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. female hop plant No. 832-17 with an unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. male hop plant No. 833-53M, and unique particularly for its cones’ unusually high percentage of alpha acids when compared to its female grandparent variety Galena (unpatented) and otherwise as herein described.

Its grandparent was Galena hops, but it doesn’t appear to have been subsequently named and made available commercially. FreshHops mentions it only briefly with not much more information than the patent application.
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Patent No. 606586A: Malt Stirrer

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Today in 1898, US Patent 606586 A was issued, an invention of Jules Alphonse Saladin, for his “Malt Stirrer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

It is my purpose to provide improved mechanism for propelling the turning-over carriage in both directions, for raising and lowering the spiral shovels at the end of each movement of the carriage and before beginning the next movement, and for initiating and terminating those operations of the mechanism which are automatic.

It is my purpose also to improve the construction, arrangement, and operation of the gearing and of those parts which mesh and unmesh the same at different points in the operation of the turning-over mechanism.

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Patent No. 3672390A: Draw-Off Tube

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Today in 1972, US Patent 3672390 A was issued, an invention of Elbert Gravesteijn, assigned to Amstel Brouwerij, for his “Draw-Off Tube.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The invention relates to a draw-off tube having on its free end a frontally closed tubular extension, to which there is detachably connected a head with an external, radial flange provided with flattened portions on its circumference, and a cylindrical externally screw threaded casing extending axially from said flange and surrounding said tubular extension coaxially, which external screw thread, after insertion of the draw of? tube in a cask of beer or the like, admits of being screwed into the internal screw thread of the bung hole of the cask, a ring valve loaded by a spring, more particularly .by a helical compression spring, being provided in the space between the inner circumference of the cylindrical casing and the outer circumference of the tubular extension, which ring valve is axially displaceable from the seats formed on said circumferences and which ring valve has its outer circumference adapted to free or close the compressed gas passage and has its inner circumference adapted to simultaneously free or close the beer passage formed by a row of radial openings provided in the wall of the tubular extension adjacent its free end, said cylindrical casing being provided with arms downwardly extending therefrom, which arms are detachably connected with a radial flange provided on the extension, which flange supports the compression spring.

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Patent No. 3327612A: Apparatus For Use In Brewing

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Today in 1967, US Patent 3327612 A was issued, an invention of Conrad Lenz, for his “Apparatus for Use in Brewing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates, in general, to brewing apparatus and, in particular, to a new and useful mashing device comprising a unit consisting of a tank for receiving the soaked malt, a feed grinder for the soaked malt and a conveyor for moving the crushed material from the outlet of the feed grinder to a brewing pan or mash copper and of means actuated by the emptying of the unit of the mashed material to discontinue the driving mechanisms.

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Harry Potter Beer

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Today, June 26, in 1997, the first Harry Potter book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, was published in the United Kingdom. If that title looks wrong to you, that’s because in America it was titled Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone because the published “thought that a child would not want to read a book with the word ‘philosopher’ in the title.” They may have been right, but it’s still a little sad. At any rate, in the seven novels there was something called “Butterbeer,” described as a drink that “can be served either cold with a taste similar to cream soda or frozen as a slush with a butterscotch-like foam on top.” Basically, it’s fake beer for kids. More interestingly, a Los Angeles artist or designer by the name of Anita Brown did a series of imaginary labels for beers based on the titles of each the seven books.

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And here’s each title in order:

HP-stout

HP-amber

HP-pilsner

HP-lager

HP-porter

HP-hefe

HP-hops

A fun exercise, with some fairly clever names. I wonder if the beers she chose would pair with the individual stories themselves? I only read the first two books, but didn’t really care that much for them; they never really grabbed me the way they did a lot of people. Another, somewhat similar, series that was published around the same time, the Golden Compass and the His Dark Materials trilogy was, in my opinion, was far richer and more interesting, but Harry Potter certainly was a phenomenon and anything that gets more people reading is a great thing in my opinion. Happy Harry Potter Day.

Patent No. 8205527B2: Watchband Bottle Opener

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Today in 2012, US Patent 8205527 B2 was issued, an invention of Dominic A. Chenelia, for his “Watchband bottle opener with central extending projection to receive a bottlecap thereunder.” Here’s the Abstract:

A bottle opening wristband, having: a pivot member; a buckle loop rotatably connected to the pivot member; a first projection extending from a center edge of the buckle loop, the projection being dimensioned to be received under an edge of a bottle cap; and a second projection positioned opposite the first projection, wherein the first and second projections are positioned on opposite sides of the pivot member.

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Patent No. 192539A: Improvement In Beer-Coolers

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Today in 1877, US Patent 192539 A was issued, an invention of John Staugler, for his “Improvement in Beer-Coolers.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention consists in the peculiar construction of’ a cooling-box, resting on a frame or horse, with a rounded cover hinged to the box.

The shape of the box, and especially the cover, follows the form of the cask as closely as convenient, and leaves only in the lower part of the box sufficient space to put in a few pieces of ice, for the purpose of keeping the contents of the cask cool while on draft.

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Patent No. D92640S: Design For A Beer Bottle

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Today in 1934, US Patent D92640 S was issued, an invention of Harry Ennever, for his “Design for a Beer Bottle.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description this the entirety of what is claimed:

I invented a new, original, and ornamental Design for a Beer Bottle, of which the following is a description. The ornamental design for a beer bottle, reference being had to the [sic] substantially as shown in the accompanying drawing.

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Patent No. 857843A: Beer-Service Apparatus

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Today in 1907, US Patent 857843 A was issued, an invention of William F. Stark, for his “Beer-Service Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to and has for an object to provide an improved beer service apparatus.

In the dispensing of liquids, more particularly malt beverages, the casks containing the same are usually stored in the cellar, and in the tap room, situated at some place on a higher plane than the casks, there are suitable faucets connected to the casks by a series of piping, the casks also being connected with a suitable pressure device, as for instance, a source of compressed air supply whereby the beverage is forced to the faucets and is there drawn as occasion may demand, the presence of the compressed air preventing the volatilization of the beverage and the escape of the entrained gas. During those portions of the day when the beverage is not being drawn from the faucets it will remain in the pipes between the casks and the faucets, and should the pipes have cooling coils connected with them, the beverage will become unduly chilled.

It is one of the objects of my present invention to provide means whereby the beverage may be returned from the pipes into the casks and there retained until it is again desired to force it to the faucets.

My present improvement makes use of the method of returning liquid under pressure to its receptacle by counter pressure and gravity, by employing means for connecting the draw faucet at its point of delivery to the counter pressure.

The passage of malt beverages through pipes has a tendency to gum and coat the inside of the pipes, rendering the same foul, and requiring frequent purging to keep them in a proper hygienic condition. The present improvement embodies means whereby the pipes may be filled with water for preventing them from becoming dry after the time the beverage has been returned to the cask and during the time the pipes remain idle, and also for the purpose of flushing and washing the pipes. This can be done by the employment of the present improvement without uncoupling the pipes from their connection with the casks or with the draw tubes which are ordinarily employed for establishing communication with the cask, and this while using a draw faucet of ordinary form.

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