Patent No. 3625399A: Automatic Carbonated Beverage Dispensing System

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3625399 A was issued, an invention of Noel D. Heisler, assigned to the Schlitz Brewing Co., for his “Automatic Carbonated Beverage Dispensing System.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

In general, the invention is directed to an electrical release or dispensing system for a plurality of carbonated beverages stored in suitable containers where it is desirable at a remote distance therefrom to initiate the dispensing of the beverages from another and successive container when the container from which the beverage being dispensed is empty. The system provides a header which is connected to the containers to be emptied by separated conduits in which are located solenoid liquid valves. These valves are separately actuated from a selector control unit to open a respective conduit from a container to the header and then to to a tap. A second header is connected to a source of Co gas and flow of gas from the header to the containers are through separate conduits to each container. Solenoid fluid valves are located in each gas conduit and are individually actuated to control the flow of gas to the container being tapped. The opening of a respective fluid solenoid valve occurs simultaneously with the opening of a corresponding liquid valve An important feature of the invention is that the dispensing valves are opened by momentary high surge of current to seize the solenoid armature and are held in the open position by a low holding current. The holding current consumes less power and consequently gives off less heat. In an alternative construction, the liquid dispensing valves may each be dual winding units having an opening winding and a holding winding. The holding winding draws a lesser current and consequently also minimizes generation of heat. Excessive heat is deleterious to the carbonate beverage being dispensed.

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Anchor Christmas Ale 1998

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It’s day twenty-four, a full case, of my flurry of a flight to Christmas featuring all 42 labels from Anchor’s Christmas Ale — a.k.a. Our Special Ale — all different beers (well, mostly different) and all different labels, each one designed by local artist Jim Stitt, up to and including this year’s label.

1998 was the twenty-fourth year that Anchor made their Christmas Ale, and this year marked another year that Anchor’s Our Special Ale included spices. Like the previous year’s, a spiced brown ale was created for the year’s Christmas Ale. This twenty-fourth label was a “California Juniper,” or “Juniperus californica.”

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Session #118: Guess Who’s Coming To The Beer Dinner

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For our 118th Session, our host will be Stan Hieronymus, who started the Session writes Appellation Beer, among much else. For his topic, he’s chosen to give us an interesting exercise, more like a game called Who You Gonna Invite?, which asks this simple question. “If you could invite four people dead or alive to a beer dinner who would they be? What four beers would you serve?” So maybe not so simple when you start to really think about it, but here’s what else he has to add about our assignment.

If the questions look familiar it might be because we played the game here nine years ago. It was fun, so let’s take the show on the road. To participate, answer these questions Dec. 2 in a blog post (or, what the heck, in a series of tweets). Post the url in the comments here or email me a link. I’ll post a roundup with links some time the following week.

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It seems like such a simple task. Just pick four people and four beers. But of course, there’s nothing easy about it at all. First, the people. Choosing four also means leaving out innumerable others, so that has to be factored into the decision. Whoever you pick, dozens (hundreds, maybe) more have to be left off the guest list. I like a lot of people, and have, I like to think, wide tastes so there are a lot of people I would like to include. But then there’s also the mix of people. You want the group to have good chemistry, to get along, or at least respect one another enough to keep the conversation enjoyable even if there are disagreements.

Then there’s the “dead or alive” part of the equation. That ups the ante, I think. Because while I think it would be a great dinner with just some of my favorite beer writers. I would happily pass an evening dining with Stan, Stephen Beaumont, Lew Bryson and Emily Sauter (with apologies to my fellow writers I didn’t choose). But if I could invite Michael Jackson or Fred Eckhardt, what then? That would certainly change the guest list. Should you choose Pliny the Elder or Pliny the Younger (the man, not the beer)?

Or would I choose four of my favorite celebrities? Maybe Elvis Costello, Phoebe Cates, Harrison Ford and John Cleese. And not necessarily a celebrity in the conventional sense, but Noam Chomsky would be high on my list. I’d also like to invite the reclusive Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin & Hobbes, although he probably wouldn’t come. But add the deceased to the mix and I might go with Bill Hicks, Katherine Hepburn, Maynard Ferguson or John Updike. Or I might go more obscure, with people like William Gruber, who invented View-Master, or Jay Ward, who created Rocky & Bullwinkle. If we could choose fictional people to invite it would be pretty easy: Indiana Jones, James Bond, Simon Templar and Captain Malcolm Reynolds, from Firefly.

What about family? There are certainly unanswered questions I have for both of my parents and the grandfather who died when I was still an infant. And I would love to pick the brain of Johann Stamm, my ancestor on my Mom’s side who first emigrated to Pennsylvania from Berne, Switzerland in 1745. I know almost nothing about him, apart from where he was born, and the fact that he was an anabaptist and a farmer. And I would love another chance to talk to my Uncle Wilbur. He wasn’t really my uncle, but was my grandmother’s second husband, who she divorced before I was even born. He was an alcoholic, and when he was trying to get sober, he lived in our basement for months, maybe a little over a year, I’m not sure how long it was. But when no one else would have anything to do with Wilbur, my mother took him in. He was kind to me; he encouraged me to try new things, and we became close. Then one day he got better, I guess, and left. I rarely saw him after that, and I would love to know more about his life. When my mother died, he came to the funeral, and because my grandmother did not want him there, he paid his respects from a distance, and I can still see him clearly standing beside a tall tree, remote and separated from the rest of the people at the gravesite, openly weeping. I still get choked up at the memory of seeing him there, and I wish I’d had an opportunity to know him better.

Or what about some of history’s most famous. Who wouldn’t want to share a beer with Leonardo Da Vinci, Aristotle or Albert Einstein. For conversation, who wouldn’t want to sit at a table with Oscar Wilde, Samuel Johnson, William Shakespeare and Ben Franklin. I’ve always had a thing for U.S. history during the time of American Independence — and I make my family watch the musical 1776 every 4th of July — so I would love to raise a tankard with Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, George Washington and James Madison. I’m also an inveterate art lover, so I’d love to sit down with Rene Magritte, and my daughter was named for suffragist Alice Paul, so it might be interesting to include her, too.

So thinking through the available options and opportunities, I don’t feel any closer to choosing my four guests, but I guess I have to make up my mind. Since there’s a chance, however remote, that I might be invited to have a drink with someone who’s still alive, the chance to spend time with someone previously deceased is just too good to not take advantage of.

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So here’s my guest list:

  1. Bill Hicks. Besides being my favorite comedian, I wrote a novel in which he becomes a central character in the story, so I would love the opportunity to spend more time talking with him and sharing a meal.
  2. Benjamin Franklin. I want some wit at the table, and arguably there were wittier people to choose, but Franklin is from Philadelphia, and was part of my local history growing up. So he has to be my historical choice.
  3. John Updike. Updike grew up in my hometown of Shillington, Pennsylvania, and wrote about it and the surrounding area fictionally throughout his career. I read a lot of his novels, short stories and poetry since I was a kid. He was a great writer, and it would be great to have him at my table.
  4. Johann Stamm. It could be a disaster since I know almost nothing about my earliest American ancestor. He may not drink at all. He may be dull. But the chance to extend what I know about my family history before America is too tantalizing to pass up.

Four glasses with different beers

The same holds true for the beers you choose, too. I’m assuming, since the people you invite can be alive or dead, that the beer can be, too. Which would mean you could choose any beer, fresh or centuries old. How amazing would that be? Amazing, maybe, but no less difficult. So which four beers?

Since according to Stan’s instructions this is meant to be a “beer dinner,” and there’s no word on what the food might be, we have to assume it can be anything, and possibly would be dictated by the beers chosen. So like the exercise of choosing guests, the beers are tough to pick, too. You want something special, I think, something worthy of the guest list. I think you’d want a mix of beers, not all the same, and a progression from first to last, from appetizer to dessert.

But while the beer is important to a successful beer dinner, it may not be the most important aspect of it. Beer is in the title, of course, but I also think that it really doesn’t matter too much. The fact is that what makes a beer dinner great has as much to do with the company as the chef’s skill, the brewer’s magic and whoever paired the two together for each dish. I’ve had great food and beer at dinners but sat alone or with people I hardly knew and would have been just as happy at home. I’ve also had so-so food and beer choices but because I was with people I loved, respected or both, it was an amazing evening. The point is, while it may seem counterintuitive, I don’t think the beer is the most important ingredient in a beer dinner. The people are what elevate a good beer dinner to a great one.

So for that reason, I didn’t put nearly as much thought into the beer as I did the guest list. I think it’s enough to choose four beers I love, and would like to share with my friends at the table. And that’s true at this fancy exercise of a beer dinner or a simple get together with a few friends.

There are pleny of beers I’d like to include, such as Anchor Spruce Beer, which they made one time in 1991 for GABF’s 10th anniversary. I was one of the few people to really love it — even Fritz Maytag thought it had too much spruce character — but since I’m almost alone on revering it, I won’t do that to my guests. But I will pick just four beers that I do really love. Are they my favorite beers of all-time? Nah, I don’t think I have a list like that. Beers are too much of a time and a place for that kind of list making. So I think it’s best to pick four I’d like to drink right now, and want to share with my guests.

Here’s the beers to be served:

  1. Anchor Liberty Ale. This was the first hoppy beer I fell in love with, and I still love it. It’s always the first beer I order whenever I visit the taproom at Anchor.
  2. Orval. Still my favorite all-purpose Belgian beer, and my favorite Trappist beer.
  3. Cantillon Gueuze, from an older vintage, but aged just a few years.
  4. Bass No. 1 Barley Wine, aged one year, fresh from around 1880 or so. It’s probably just its mystic, but I’d love to try this historic beer.

Patent No. 3995749A: Beer Keg Pallet

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Today in 1976, US Patent 3995749 A was issued, an invention of Lewis Byron Haskins, assigned to the Johns-Manville Corporation, for his “Beer Keg Pallet.” Here’s the Abstract:

A pallet for handling cylindrical objects, particularly beer kegs, is disclosed. The pallet has a flat deck with supporting end portions. The inner surfaces of the end portions contain dual curvature segments to rest with and restrain the objects. Intermediate legs are also present for support and further restraint of the objects. Preferably the pallet is molded of a lightweight plastic.

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Historic Beer Birthday: Henry Liebmann

Today is the birthday of Henry Liebmann (December 6, 1836-March 27, 1915). He was born Heinrich Liebmann in Schmiedelfeld, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany. His father owned the Castle Schmiedelfeld, but when Henry was four, the family moved to Ludwigsburg and operated the Zum Stern Inn there, which also included a brewery. For political reasons, some of the family moved to America around 1850 to build a home, and the rest followed in 1854. Initially he ran the old Maasche Brewery, but later built a new brewery in Bushwick. Originally, it was called the Samuel Liebmann Brewery, but when his sons joined the brewery, it was called the S. Liebmann’s Sons Brewery. When Henry’s father died in 1872, Henry and his brothers took over the family brewery, and Henry became brewmaster. After prohibition ended, the brothers’ six sons re-opened the brewery as the simpler Liebmann Breweries, but in 1964 they changed the name again to Rheingold Breweries, after their most popular beer. The brewery closed in 1976.

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Here’s his obituary from the Brewers Journal, in July of 1915:

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This is from “The Originators of Rheingold Beer: From Ludwigsburg to Brooklyn – A Dynasty of German-Jewish Brewers,”
by Rolf Hofmann, originally published in Aufbau, June 21, 2001:

New Yorkers over the age of fifty will remember the brand name Rheingold Beer and the company’s brilliant publicity stunt in which a bevy of attractive young women competed annually for the privilege of being elected that year’s Miss Rheingold and appearing in ads on billboards and in the subways throughout the New York area.

The beer’s evocative name with its allusion to Germany’s great river, was the culmination of a German-Jewish family enterprise that had its beginnings in 1840 in the town of Ludwigsburg, north of Stuttgart, in what was then the Kingdom of Württemberg. One Samuel Liebmann, a member of a prominent Jewish family in the region, settled there and bought the inn and brewery “Zum Stern.” A liberal and staunch supporter of Republican ideals, Liebmann encouraged other like-minded citizens, including some soldiers from the garrison, to meet in his hospitable surroundings. The ideas fomented there contributed to the local revolution of 1848. It brought the opprobrium of the King down upon Liebmann’s enterprise, and “Zum Stern” was declared off limits to the soldiers. Soon thereafter, in 1850, Samuel Liebmann emigrated to the U.S.

The family settled in Brooklyn and Samuel, together with his three sons, Joseph, Henry, and Charles, opened a brewery once again at the corner of Forest and Bremen Streets. With the responsibilities divided among the family – Henry became the brewing expert, Charles. the engineer and architect, Joseph, finance manager – the company was already flourishing by the time of Samuel’s death in 1872. Success also led to a concern for the company’s Brooklyn surroundings, and the Liebmanns became involved in local welfare – focusing on housing and drainage systems.

Each of the three brothers had two sons, and when the older Liebmanns retired in 1903, the six members of the third generation took over. Other members of the family also contributed to the gradual expansion of the company. In 1895 Sadie Liebmann (Joseph’s daughter), married Samuel Simon Steiner, a trader in high quality hop, an essential ingredient for good beer. Steiner’s father had begun merchandising hop in Laupheim in 1845 and still today, S.S. Steiner, with its headquarters in New York, is one of the leading hop merchants. Under these fortuitous family circumstances, beer production grew constantly. In the early years, the brewery had produced 1000 barrels per year, by 1914 its output stood at 700,000 barrels.

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Henry Liebmann (center with white beard) and family.

Unfortunately, political developments in the U.S. between 1914 and 1933 were extremely disadvantageous for the Liebmann brewery. The resentment against Germany and anything German during World War I led to an informal boycott of German beers. Following close upon the lean wartime years, was the implementation of Prohibition in 1920 forbidding the manufacturing and trading of alcohol. The Liebmann enterprise managed to survive by producing lemonade and a product they called “Near Beer.”

With the reinstatement of legal alcohol production under President Roosevelt in 1933, opportunities for the brewery opened up, abetted by the anti-Semitic policies of Hitler’s Germany. The pressures on Jewish businessmen there, brought Dr. Hermann Schülein, general manager of the world-renowned LšwenbrŠu brewery, to America. Schulein’s father, Joseph, had acquired two of Munich’s leading breweries at the end of the nineteenth century–Union and Münchner Kindl–and his son had managed the 1920 merger with Löwenbrau. Arriving in New York with this experience behind him, Hermann Schülein became one of the top managers of the Liebmann brewery and was instrumental in its spectacular growth after World War II.

Working with Philip Liebmann (great-grandson of Samuel), Schülein developed a dry lager beer with a European character to be marketed under the brand name “Rheingold.” According to company legend, the name was created in 1883 at a brewery dinner following a performance at the Metropolitan Opera. When the conductor took up his glass, he was so taken with the shade of the beer, that he declared it to be the color of “Rheingold.” For New Yorkers, however, the name Rheingold did not bring to mind the Nibelungen fables, but the pretty young ladies who participated in Schülein’s most brilliant marketing strategy – the selection of each year’s Miss Rheingold by the beer-drinking public of greater New York

At the height of the campaign’s success in the 1950’s and 60’s, the Liebmann Brewery had an output of beer ten times that of Löwenbrau at the same time in Munich.

For thirty years, Rheingold Beer reigned supreme in the New York area, but by 1976, as a local brewery, it could no longer compete with nationwide companies such as Anheuser & Busch, Miller, and Schlitz, and its doors were closed. Only recently, using the same brewmaster, Rheingold is once again being sold in the tri-state area.

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Here’s an “Origin of Liebmann Brewery” posted by a relative on Ancestry.com:

On May 12 1833 (Sulzbach-Laufen Archive) Samuel and his older brother Heinrich bought a castle/inn Schmiedelfeld, Sulzbach-Laufen, Schwaebisch Hall District that dated from 1739. They renovated the place and created a prosperous farm/estate and in 1837 began a brewery in the cellar. In 1840, he moved to Ludwigsburg, near Stuttgart and purchased the gasthaus [guest house or inn] “Zum Stern” on Seestrasse 9 (later Zum Rebstock) which included a brewery. (source: Translation extract from Dr. Joacim Hahn’s book, History of the Jewish Community of Ludwigsburg)

After supporting a movement to oust King William I of Wurttemberg, and sensing the wavering tolerance of Jewish businessmen, Samuel sent his eldest son Joseph to the US in 1854 to scout out a location to establish a brewery.

Samuel retired in 1868 and turned the family business over to his sons Joseph, Charles, and Henry under the name S. Liebmann’s Sons Brewery.

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St. Nicholas: Patron Saint of Brewers

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While St. Nicholas is best known — in America, at least — for wearing red and white and giving presents to Children each December 25, he’s actually the patron saint for a number of professions, places and afflictions. His feast day is not actually Christmas Day, but almost three weeks earlier on December 6. That’s the reason why the holiday beer Samichlaus is brewed each year on this day. The person we associate with Christmas, Santa Claus, was based on Saint Nicholas, who was originally known (and still is in some places) as Bishop Nicholas of Myra.

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Nicholas is the patron saint of brewers, among many others. He’s also the patron saint against imprisonment, against robberies, against robbers. And Nick’s the patron for apothecaries, bakers, barrel makers, boatmen, boot blacks, boys, brewers, brides, captives, children, coopers, dock workers, druggists, fishermen, Greek Catholic Church in America, Greek Catholic Union, grooms, judges, lawsuits lost unjustly, longshoremen, maidens, mariners, merchants, penitent murderers, newlyweds, old maids, parish clerks, paupers, pawnbrokers, perfumeries, perfumers, pharmacists, pilgrims, poor people, prisoners, sailors, scholars, schoolchildren, shoe shiners, spinsters, students, penitent thieves, travellers, University of Paris, unmarried girls, and watermen. Places he’s the patron for are Apulia, Italy; Avolasca, Italy; Bardolino, Italy; Bari, Italy; Cammarata, Sicily, Italy; Cardinale, Italy; Cas Concos, Spain; Creazzo, Italy; Duronia, Italy; Fossalto, Italy; Gagliato, Italy; Greece; La Thuile, Italy; Lecco, Italy; Limerick, Ireland; Liptovský Mikulás, Slovakia; Lorraine; Mazzano Romano, Italy; Mentana, Italy; Miklavž na Dravskem polju, Slovenia; Naples, Italy; Portsmouth, England; Russia; Sassari, Italy; Sicily; Is-Siggiewi, and Malta.

He also has many names around the world, such as Baba Chaghaloo, Father Christmas, Joulupukki, Kanakaloka, Kris Kringle, Pere Noel, Papa Noël, Santa Claus, and Weihnachtsmann (“Christmas Man” or “Nikolaus”), to name just a few.

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say:

Saint Nicholas (March 15, 270 – December 6, 346) is the common name for Nicholas of Myra, a saint and Bishop of Myra (in Lycia, part of modern-day Turkey). Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nicholas the Wonderworker. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, and is now commonly identified with Santa Claus. His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was the custom in his time. In 1087, his relics were furtively translated to Bari, in southern Italy; for this reason, he is also known as Nicholas of Bari.

The historical Saint Nicholas is remembered and revered among Catholic and Orthodox Christians. He is also honoured by various Anglican and Lutheran churches. Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, and children, and students in Greece, Belgium, Romania, Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia, the Republic of Macedonia, Slovakia, Serbia and Montenegro. He is also the patron saint of Barranquilla, Bari, Amsterdam, Beit Jala, and Liverpool. In 1809, the New-York Historical Society convened and retroactively named Sancte Claus the patron saint of Nieuw Amsterdam, the Dutch name for New York City. He was also a patron of the Varangian Guard of the Byzantine emperors, who protected his relics in Bari. So beloved is Saint Nicholas by Russians, one commonly heard saying is that “if God dies, at least we’ll still have St. Nicholas.”

The American image of Santa Claus in red and white has more to do with marketing than anything else. I wrote about this in The Santa Hypocrisy a couple of years ago when the Shelton Brothers were in hot water from several states who tried to tell them Santa Claus on a beer label threatened the American way of life and especially the impressionable young kiddies who would all be led down the path to underage drinking and alcoholism because Santa was depicted on a beer label. It was an utterly ridiculous position and they ultimately backed down, but it’s indicative of our puritan hang-ups as a culture and our general paternalism where we believe everyone needs to be protected. And in retrospect I can now see how the “institutionalized demonization of alcohol” creates the conditions for such decisions. Remember the message? “Alcohol is evil. No one can be trusted with it.” When that’s the underlying assumption, you create rules for what can and can’t be displayed on a label that are way beyond reason; standards no other products have to follow because they’re not seen as inherently evil.

But before the 20th century and in other parts of the world, Santa Claus was and still is depicted in many different ways and in various colors. Father Christmas, for example, is often seen wearing a green robe, as in the British Isles he’s more associated with nature and the old Celtic religions. The yule log, Christmas tree, wreaths, mistletoe and many other features we take for granted during the holidays do not have direct Christian origins, but were appropriated from pagan religions in order to make the transition to Christianity easier for the masses to make. Personally, I love a green Santa Claus because it reminds me of hops, and a Santa that stands for hops is one I can get behind.
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Few American beer labels show Santa precisely because of our peculiar brand of paternalism and the label laws spawned by our institutionalized demonization of alcohol. Santa’s Private Reserve, from Rogue in Oregon, is one of the few I can think of year after year. Most, not surprisingly, come from abroad, where people take a more reasonable approach to both the holidays and alcohol. There’s the famous Santa’s Butt from Ridgeway Brewing in England, but also Pickled Santa from the Hop Back Brewery and Austria’s Samichlaus is translated as “Santa Claus.”

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Why does it seem like we’re the only uptight nation on Earth when it comes to this silly issue. In Hong Kong, a giant Santa Claus is shown with a mug of beer, and no one seems to be that concerned. Try putting something like that up here, and all hell would break loose. We’re the only country complaining that there’s a “War on Christmas,” as stupid a notion as ever there was one, especially in a nation where those who celebrate Christmas constitute the vast majority.

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The point is if the church can have a patron saint of brewing, why do religious people object to St. Nicholas being on beer labels? Wouldn’t it make perfect sense for brewers to want to place their patron saint on their beer?

Throughout Europe, Monks not only kept alive the method of brewing beer but improved techniques for making it. A Benedictine nun in Germany, Hildegard von Bingen, is most likely responsible for the introduction of hops in beer. Religion and brewing are intertwined throughout history and, in every place except the United States, that continues to be the case. Why? What about our particular religiosity makes us incapable of seeing that and reconciling it? Why is it seemingly acceptable for Santa Claus to be used to sell everything under the sun … except alcohol. Santa sells cigarettes, soda pop, fast food and pretty much everything else with capitalistic glee yet alcohol is the corrupting influence? That’s going too far somehow? Please.

That Santa Claus only appeals to children is usually the rallying cry of the buffoons who complain about this sort of thing, but a survey of pop culture will reveal that St. Nick is used in all manner of adult contexts. Kris Kringle, like the spirit of Christmas itself, belongs to all of us, not just children. There’s no doubt that I love seeing Christmas through the fresh eyes of my children, their innocence and wonder adds a new dimension to my enjoyment of the season. But I loved the holidays as much before I was a father and after I was an adult, too.

That St. Nicholas appeals to wide array of people should be obvious from the huge number of groups and places that consider him their patron. When so many look to him for comfort in such a varied number of ways, how can anyone say what he is or what he isn’t, where he’s appropriate or where he’s not? They can’t of course, despite neo-prohibitionists and our government’s attempts to the contrary. As the patron saint of brewers, Santa Claus is, and ought to be, perfectly at home on a bottle of beer.

There’s also a wealth of information about the real Santa Claus at the Saint Nicholas Center online.

Anchor Christmas Ale 1997

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It’s day twenty-three of my seasonal sprint to Christmas featuring all 42 labels from Anchor’s Christmas Ale — a.k.a. Our Special Ale — all different beers (well, mostly different) and all different labels, each one designed by local artist Jim Stitt, up to and including this year’s label.

1997 was the twenty-third year that Anchor made their Christmas Ale, and this year marked another year that Anchor’s Our Special Ale included spices. Like the previous year’s, a spiced brown ale was created for the year’s Christmas Ale. This twenty-third label was a “Scots Pine” or “Pinus sylvestris.”

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Beer Birthday: Natalie Cilurzo

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Today is the 48th birthday of Natalie Cilurzo, co-founder of Russian River Brewing, and the woman who makes everything run smoothly at both the brewpub and the production brewery. You’d be hard-pressed to find a nicer person in the beer world, and though she spent many years working with wine, the brewing industry is all the richer now that she’s left that all behind her. Join me in wishing Natalie a very happy birthday.

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Natalie with Vinnie at his 40th birthday party a few years ago.

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Jen Garris, from Pi Bar, Dave Keene’s wife Jen Smith, and Natalie at the Toronado 25th Anniversary Blending Dinner.

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Four out of Five, the Cilurzos and a Stan. From Left: Natalie, Stan Hieronymus, Vinnie’s mother and father, and Vinnie Cilurzo at the World Beer Cup gala dinner in 2008.

Best man Vinnie Cilurzo, Dave Keene, Jennifer Smith and maid of honor Natalie Cilurzo
Best man Vinnie Cilurzo, Dave Keene, Jennifer Smith and maid of honor Natalie at Dan & Jen’s wedding during GABF 2010.

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Me, Natalie and Sean Paxton (and his daughter Olivia) at the Pliny the Younger release in 2011. (photo by Mario Rubio.)

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Natalie two years for the 8th annual All Hopped Up for the Cure.