Beer In Ads #2213: Suppose An Old Lady Talks For A Change!


Sunday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1942. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, which features the photo of an elderly woman, with the headline “Suppose An Old Lady Talks For A Change!” It will strike a discordant note to our modern notions of gender equality, but of course it was a different time and most likely didn’t ruffle many feathers in 1942, especially smack dab in the middle of World War Two. Read the whole thing at your peril, you have been warned. After laying out what a wife can, and should, do to support her husband and make his life more enjoyable after a hard day at work, she suggests. “I think it’s like that when it comes to beer and husbands and other grown ups. A man should be able to relax in at home in the way that he likes best … with a glass of mild and friendly beer, if that’s what he wants and enjoys. Served that way, by a wife’s own hand, beer is truly a beverage of moderation, as Nature intended it should be.”

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Beer In Ads #2212: Mrs. Caruso … Twin Boys … Seven Pounds … Where’s That Beer?


Saturday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1941. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, an old country doctor, just home from delivering twin boys, is removing his boots and yelling to, presumably, his wife, with the details of the birth. But then he also yells out “where’s that beer?” He sure looks like a kindly old doc, and it was a different time, but that still sounds so odd to hear.

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Beer In Ads #2211: Which Road, America?


Friday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1939. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, Uncle Sam stands on a hill, looking out over America laid out before him, with at least three distinct paths to choose from, wondering to himself which one to choose. What three paths, you may be asking.

  1. The Dead-End Road to Excess
  2. The Harsh Road of Intolerance
  3. The Straight Road Ahead, Which is the Way of Moderation and Sobriety

Pretty subtle, eh? After all, beer “is the bulwark of moderation, according to the verdict of history, the weight of scientific evidence, and the everyday experience of millions.”

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Beer In Ads #2210: Right Down Their Alley … A Mellow Glass Of Beer Or Ale!


Thursday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1941. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, some affluent young men and women are enjoying an evening of bowling, a popular pastime in the 1950s. And apparently, “beer and bowling” is as perfect a pairing as “ham and eggs,” “hot dogs and mustard,” or “Thanksgiving and mince pie.” Personally, I don’t think mince pie goes with anything. But I do agree that “Beer belongs so definitely with your hours of relaxation.”

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Beer In Ads #2209: It Brings A Livelihood To Thousands Of Farmers


Wednesday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1939. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, the impact that the brewing industry was having at the time was neatly illustrated by placing an order with “The Farmers of America” for 3,000,000,000 pounds of barley, 31.5 million pounds of hops, 800 million pounds of corn and 186 million pounds of rice. And that doesn’t even include the yeast wranglers. And that, according to the ad, comes out to a total of $100,000,000, or $1,747,043,170 adjusted for inflation. And that also doesn’t include the $400 million that the beer industry paid in taxes, either.

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Beer In Ads #2208: At The Work-Day’s End, There’s Rest … In Beer And Ale


Tuesday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1941. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, by American illustrator Harry Anderson, the scene is on an idealized farm. After a hard day’s work, the farmer’s wife is pouring him a beer as he rests against a tree. “At the work-day’s end, there’s rest … in beer and ale.”

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Beer In Ads #2207: The Bitterness Of Battle Fades In The Friendliness Of Beer And Ale


Monday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1941. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, titled “The Bitterness of Battle Fades in the Friendliness of Beer and Ale,” two men are sitting in a backyard, sharing a beer. They’d been playing horseshoes, but one of them, presumably the winner, said. “And now let’s have a beer together.”

USBF-1941-bitterness-fades

Beer In Ads #2206: But Why Court-Martial The Whole Regiment?


Sunday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1940s. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, a long line of soldiers are in perfect formation. Except for the one who just dropped his rifle. According to the USBIF, he’s like that one bad beer retailer who breaks the law or “permit anti-social conditions.” This is another ad about their “clean-up or close-up” program where they “want every beer retail establishment to be as wholesome as beer itself.”

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Beer In Ads #2205: Nature Makes Beer


Saturday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1940s. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, showing an idyllic farm, it appears that they’re trying to change the image of bars as men’s clubs, dark and dank. The headline, “A wholesome beverage, it deserves to be sold only in wholesome surroundings.” The later mention that a modern invention, “a new kind of tavern brings you good beer and ale in clean, wholesome surroundings.” It’s an interesting effort, and obviously they didn’t do away with the dive bar (thank goodness) but it did herald an age that had several different kinds of bars, just like today.

Nature-Makes-Beer-Paper-Ads-United-Brewers-Industrial-Foundation

Beer In Ads #2204: Thanks A Million!


Friday’s ad is a trade ad, by the United States Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1939. After prohibition ended, the industry started doing PSA-type ads in an attempt to create goodwill for beer and brewers. They would later go on to do a fairly sophisticated series of ads between 1946 and 1956, known unofficially as Beer Belongs. Officially, they were “The Home Life in America” series, consisting of 120 ads, with a new ad running in major periodicals each month. Last year, for my Beer in Ads series, I featured every one of them. But in the years before that, the U.S. Brewing Industry Foundation (a precursor to the original Brewer’s Association) dabbled with a variety of similar ads promoting the industry as a whole. These were especially popular during World War 2, and in fact they even won an award from the government for some of these ads. Most of the ads were black and white, although a few were in color, though usually in a minimal way, with a few colors accented rather than being in full color.

In this ad, the worker, the taxman and the farmer are all happier since beer was once again back after prohibition was repealed. That’s because since repeal, beer’s made one million jobs, the brewing industry’s paid a million dollars a day in taxes, and three millions acres of farmland dedicated to beer’s agricultural ingredients. Because, see, “even the non-beer drinker enjoy’s beer’s economic benefits!”

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