Beer In Ads #1943: Looking Over The Vacation Trophies


Wednesday’s ad is entitled Looking Over the Vacation Trophies, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #74 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, one couple invited another over to their home only to bore them with snapshots and souvenirs from a vacation they recently took. It’s a good thing they’re also serving beer. Their guests are going to need beer to get through the evening.

074. Looking Over the Vacation Trophies by Douglass Crockwell, 1952

Beer In Ads #1942: Fiesta Time In The Southwest


Tuesday’s ad is entitled Fiesta Time in the Southwest, and the illustration was done in 1952 by John Gannam. It’s #73 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a home in one of the southwestern states has been invaded by exotic cultures, as — presumably one of the three women guests at the party has donned her Mexican or South American costume to perform a dance for “fiesta time,” whatever that means. The others are standing or sitting around drinking beers and watching her, which seems a little weird to me.

073. Fiesta Time in the Southwest by John Gannam, 1952

Beer In Ads #1941: Teaching Guests The Square Dance


Monday’s ad is entitled Teaching Guests The Square Dance, and the illustration was done in 1952 by John Gannam. It’s #72 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a group of well-dressed people are at a party at someone’s house, and after many beers — I presume, I won’t dance unless I’ve had many, many beers — someone suggests square dancing. I learned square dancing in school, 3rd or 4th grade I think, and then promptly forgot it, and never looked back. But hey, maybe with enough beer….

072. Teaching Guests the Square Dance by John Gannam, 1952

Beer In Ads #1940: First Of The Home Grown Corn


Sunday’s ad is entitled First of the Home Grown Corn, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #71 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a family sits on their porch as Dad holds a bundle of freshly picked corn. Behind him, a fairly vast tract of land is filled with cornstalks and a stone grill billows smoke from is chimney. We planted six plants last year, but didn’t pick them in time, so technically we still have not yet harvested the first of our own home grown corn. But these people seem pretty serious about it. That looks like a field, not a plot.

071. First of the Homegrown Corn by Douglass Crockwell, 1952

Beer In Ads #1939: Clambake On The Beach


Saturday’s ad is entitled Clambake On The Beach, and the illustration was done in 1952 by John Gannam. It’s #70 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, another unrealistically well-to-do family has an amazing house a short walk from the beach, and they’re hosting a well-attended clambake around the 4th of July. Since this ad ran in July of 1952, the picture in the inset is colonial, showing three men, and the text accompanying it is about Samuel Adams and Thomas Jefferson (no idea who the third person is supposed to be) and their love of beer.

070. Clambake on the Beach by John Gannam, 1952

Beer In Ads #1938: Saturday On The Lake Front


Friday’s ad is entitled Saturday On The Lake Front, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #69 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a well-to-do family is spending the weekend at the lakefront home, and entertaining with beers. It’s funny how many of these ads in the 1950s depict experiences that would not be familiar or easily relatable to the average beer drinker. Were they meant to be aspirational? Because otherwise it just seems strange to show scenes of affluence in mainstream magazines.

069. Saturday on the Lake Front by Douglass Crockwell, 1952

Beer In Ads #1937: Casting Lessons In The Backyard


Thursday’s ad is entitled Casting Lessons in the Backyard, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #68 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a group of people are relaxing in someone’s backyard. After many beers, they decided it would be a good idea to get out a fishing rod and start lawn casting.

068. Casting Lessons in the Backyard by Douglass Crockwell, 1952

Beer In Ads #1936: Amateur Fortune Teller


Wednesday’s ad is entitled Amateur Fortune Teller, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #66 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a woman put on a scarf, sat down at a table and began reading palms. Luckily, the beer probably helps with their gullibility.

067. Amateur Fortune Teller by Douglass Crockwell, 1952

Beer In Ads #1935: The Bride’s First Dinner Party


Tuesday’s ad is entitled The Bride’s First Dinner Party, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Ray Prohaska. It’s #66 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a new couple is apparently having guests over to their new home for the very first time. The table is set, and the husband has delivered beers to their guests to soften them up. I think she’s whispering to him how well things are going so far. And that, undoubtedly thanks to the beer they’re giving their guests.

066. The Bride's First Dinner Party by Ray Prohaska, 1952

Beer In Ads #1934: Home Preview Of The Mardi Gras Costume


Monday’s ad is entitled Home Preview of the Mardi Gras Costume, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #65 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a group of people in a New Orleans courtyard, beers in hand, are looking over a costume that shortly thereafter will be up on a float in a Mardi Gras parade. I don’t know if that was a common party theme, but it seems like a fairly thin excuse for a celebration.

065. Home Preview of the Mardi Gras Costume by Douglass Crockwell, 1952