Beer In Ads #1631: Anheuser-Busch Buck


Tuesday’s ad is for Anheuser-Busch Buck, from 1885. By “buck,” one presumes they mean bock and used a slightly alternate spelling. The lithograph was created by the Wittemann Brothers, Adolph and Herman, of New York. It’s odd poster, with the eagle and goat, or buck, looking almost garish or frightening, especially juxtaposed with the 1880s equivalent of a supermodel.

AB-Bock-1885

Patent No. 5021246A: Step Mashing Process For Producing Low Alcohol Beer

patent-logo
Today in 1991, US Patent 5021246 A was issued, an invention of Roger L. Sieben and Klaus D. Zastrow, assigned to Anheuser-Busch, for their “Step Mashing Process For Producing Low Alcohol Beer.” Here’s the Abstract:

A low alcohol reduced calorie beer is produced by a mashing technique wherein a main mash at a temperature below the activity range for beta-amylase is added incrementally to a brewing liquid at a temperature above the deactivation temperature of beta-amylase and below the deactivation temperature of alpha-amylase at a rate such that the added main mash is substantially instantaneously raised to the temperature of the brewing liquid. This mashing technique limits the conversion of starches by beta-amylase and other enzymes without significant loss of alpha-amylase from overheating to produce a wort having a low real degree of fermentation of from about 40% to about 46%. The main mash has a temperature of about 95° F. to 120° F., and the brewing liquid has a temperature of about 169° F. to 174° F. and can be water or a cooker mash that has been boiled and cooled. Beer can be produced having less than 2% alcohol by weight and less than about 118 calories per 12 ounce serving.

Untitled

Beer In Ads #1492: Faust Beer


Thursday’s ad is for Anheuser-Busch’s “Faust Beer,” from 1915. While you may be familiar with the Faust that Anheuser-Busch put out in 1995, part of a trio of “American Originals” released that year, along with Muenchener and Black and Tan, the original Faust was first brewed in 1885. They were still brewing it at least thirty years later, when this ad is from. Despite the imagery of the Faust of German legend who made a deal with the devil, that’s not who the beer was named for, but for Tony Faust, the Oyster King of St. Louis, a restaurant owner and drinking buddy of Adolphus Busch.

A-B-1915-Faust

Beer In Ads #1491: Barley Brings Health And Vigor


Wednesday’s ad is still another one for Anheuser-Busch’s “Malt-Nutrine,” this one from 1911. This is another ad for A-B’s non-alcoholic health drink, marketed with snake-oil salesman enthusiasm. “Barley Brings Health and Vigor” continues that tradition but works only “when ably malted and fermented with the tonic properties of Saazer Hop as in Anheuser-Busch’s Malt-Nutrine.” But I especially love this testimonial. “Thousands of delicate women will testify to its food and tonic qualities.”

A-B-1911-Malt-Nutrine

Beer In Ads #1490: Bountiful Harvests


Tuesday’s ad is yet another one for Anheuser-Busch’s “Malt-Nutrine,” this one from 1908. This is another ad for A-B’s non-alcoholic health drink, marketed with snake-oil salesman enthusiasm. “Bountiful Harvests” continues that tradition and takes “the living essence waving barley fields, blended and fermented with the tonic juices of Saazer Hops” which apparently “seethes in every bottle” of “this liquid-food,” containing “no artificial compound — but comes direct from nature’s laboratory.” Impressive stuff.

A-B-Malt-Nutrine-11-1908

Beer In Ads #1489: The Daughters Of The Farm


Monday’s ad is another one for Anheuser-Busch’s “Malt-Nutrine,” this one from 1911. This is another ad for A-B’s non-alcoholic health drink, marketed with snake-oil salesman enthusiasm. “The Daughters of the Farm” continues that tradition with claims that everyone living in rural America are “splendid examples of health and vigor” while the urban among us are “often deprived of outdoor exercise and invigorating country air.” Oh, the humanity!

A-B-1911-Daughters-of-the-farm

Beer In Ads #1488: Life-Giving American Barley


Sunday’s ad is for Anheuser-Busch’s “Malt-Nutrine,” from 1909. This is another ad for A-B’s non-alcoholic health drink, marketed with snake-oil salesman enthusiasm. “Life-Giving American Barley contains more blood-making properties than any other growth of the soil.” But wait there’s more. “Every drop of Anheuser-Busch’s Malt-Nutrine fairly bubbles and seethes with the life of mother nature’s electrifying earth — the creamy nutriment of ripened barley — the aromatic tonic of Bohemian hops — the vivifying breezes of country air — the warmth of the sun and the blessings of the gentle rains — all instilled into a living liquid food.” Damn, who wouldn’t want to drink that.

A-B-1909-Malt-Nutrine

Beer In Ads #1480: No Corn Or Corn Preparations


Saturday’s ad is for Anheuser-Busch, from 1892. Apparently shortly after the competition of a new brewhouse in St. Louis, they celebrated by sponsoring “pen and sunlight sketches of Omaha and environs” with this ad. One curious feature of the otherwise simple image ad, is this line. “No Corn or Corn Preparations are used in the manufacture of Anheuser-Busch beer. It is, therefore, the highest-priced by the most wholesome and really the least expensive for its superior quality.” Funny they didn’t mention rice.

A-B-1892-No-Corn