Beer In Ads #1385: The ‘A And Eagle’ Has Learned To Fly


Tuesday’s ad is for Budweiser, also from 1943. Another World War 2 ad, it’s again a very patriotic ad showing the Anheuser-Busch eagle soaring with wartime airplanes, or more specifically gliders, which were apparently helped along by A-B’s refrigeration division making parts for them to help with the war effort.

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Beer In Ads #1384: The Ammunition Is Being Passed


Monday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1943. A World War 2 ad, it’s a play on the poplar song “praise the lord and pass the ammunition,” written the year before. It’s also a very patriotic ad, and mostly soft sell, just celebrating the technology of the navy during the war, and then finishing with an offhand suggestion that Anheuser-Busch similarly uses cutting edge technology, too, to make their beer.

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Beer In Ads #1381: The After-Effects


Friday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1906. The ad is part of a series from that time highlighting different aspects of the beer’s process, its healthfulness and other factors. In this one, the headline is “The After-Effects,” and in the text they talk about spending “more than half the cost of our brewing is spent to insure purity.” Anything, apparently, to avoid biliousness, the scourge of beer drinking.

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Beer In Ads #1361: Have Dinner With Me Tonight


Saturday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1946. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular, though in case I’m a little glad it’s in black and white. In this ad for Budweiser, they’re advertising with a giant glass of Bud apparently making a phone call, ringing someone up for dinner. How crazy/cool is that? Yes, please, dinner with beer.

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Beer In Ads #1359: Let Me Cool You Off


Thursday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1951. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular, though in case I’m a little glad it’s in black and white. In this ad for Budweiser, they’re advertising with a giant bottle of Bud up in the mountains, along with a full tall glass, and is that a snowed in cabin I fee behind them? Who wouldn’t want to be there?

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Beer In Ads #1278: Home Of Budweiser


Sunday’s ad is for Budweiser, from the 1950s. This is a postcard showing the St. Louis brewery complex from above, but is not a photo. It’s an illustration, and these were a common way to advertise a brewery then, used not just as postcards, but as posters, calendars and other large formats that could be framed. I think they’re incredibly beautiful and wish someone would put together a coffee table book of these brewery works of art.

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Beer In Ads #1234: When Knights Were Bold


Thursday’s ad is for Anheuser-Busch, from 1945. A World War 2 ad, showing a modern soldier — a Sergeant First Class — in which he compares himself to a suit of armor, most likely while liberating a European castle. The tagline reads “When Knights were Bold .. they were not so Big.” I guess the big strapping enlisted man is taller than the knight would been, based on the armor’s size.

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Beer In Ads #1164: Budweiser Is For Girls


Thursday’s ad may not be a real ad, I’m not entirely sure. It’s for a Brasserie Belden, which I can’t find any information about at all. And the nature of the ad, more like a political attack ad, makes it seem more like a spoof than a real ad that someone might have actually ran. It has the look of an older ad, with the paper staining, at least after World War II, although it’s easy enough to fake that using PhotoShop. I don’t recall where I found this one and the fact that I can’t find any additional information about it on the interwebs further leads me to suspect its veracity, although it’s too funny not to share all the same. “Be a man. Drink Belden.”

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