Patent No. 3789622A: Ice Box For Beer Barrel

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Today in 1974, US Patent 3789622 A was issued, an invention of Ralph Yanes, for his “Ice Box For Beer Barrel.” Here’s the Abstract:

An insulated barrel shape structure for housing and suspending a beer barrel in the horizontal position surrounded by ice. The rear circular cover of the device is removable for the installation and replacement of the beer barrel and surrounding ice. The circular front cover bears a circular opening for the spigot of the beer barrel. The structure provides for an air-seal between the sides and bottom of the housed beer barrel and the iced refrigerated area of the structure.

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Patent No. 575545A: Air And Beer Connection For Beer-Casks

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Today in 1897, US Patent 575545 A was issued, an invention of Peter E. Dunn and William H. Partridge, for their “Air and Beer Connection for Beer-Casks.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to devices for hermetically closing the outlets or inlets to beer casks and to attachments for said devices for controlling the discharge of beer therefrom, and to a system of gage and pump connections attached to said devices, the object being to provide devices of improved construction for closing beer-cask openings for transportation and for connection with said openings for operating the devices thereof and for governing the discharge of beer from said casks and the introduction of air-pressure thereto; and the invention consists in the peculiar construction of said devices, apparatus, and connections, all as fully described, and. more particularly pointed out in the claim.

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Patent No. EP0142966B1: Valved Closure For Kegs Or Casks

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Today in 1988, US Patent EP 0142966 B1 was issued, an invention of Roger John Hyde, for his “Valved Closure for Kegs or Casks.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to valved closures for pressure vessels, such as kegs or casks for beverages dispensed through the valved closure by pressure gas admitted to the keg or cask through the closure.

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Patent No. 1121930A: Metal Keg Or Cask

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Today in 1914, US Patent 1121930 A was issued, an invention of Lewis V. Mather, assigned to Enameled Steel Package Corp., for his “Metal Keg or Cask.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to kegs or casks and has for its object a cask in which the hoops and the head rings are applied to the shell in an improved manner.

This invention consists essentially in the utilization of spring tongues on the shell or staves of the cask which spring out and lock with the hoops and the. head rings when the latter have been slipped into place.

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Patent No. 664185A: Keg, Barrel, Or Cask

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Today in 1900, US Patent 664185 A was issued, an invention of Charles W. Stran, for his “Keg, Barrel, Or Cask.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to improvements in kegs, barrels, or casks, and pertains more especially to an article of the character indicated that is made of sheet metal.

The object of this invention is to provide a keg, barrel, or cask that possesses great strength and durability, whose heads cannot become displaced, that can be made with facility, and that is exceedingly simple in construction and comparatively inexpensive.

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Patent No. 222639A: Improvement In Apparatus For Forcing Beer From Casks

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Today in 1879, US Patent 222639 A was issued, an invention of James A. O’Connor, for his “Improvement in Apparatus for Forcing Beer from Casks.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to an improved apparatus for maintaining the pressure in beer-4 casks, and for preserving the freshness of the beer While it is being drawn from the casks and it consists in the combination, with an air-pump, of an air-reservoir connected to the beer-cask by a suitable pipe, the said reservoir-being composed of two cylindrical or polygonal vessels, closed at their outer ends, and arranged to slide one within the other through a packed joint, as hereinafter more fully described.

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And here’s the original drawing filed with the application:
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Patent No. 1976173A: Barrel Stave

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Today in 1934, US Patent 1976173 A was issued, an invention of Edward W. Hutchings, for his “Barrel Stave.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to the manufacture of staves for barrels and other containers and the object is to utilize thoroughly seasoned and dried lumber which is now available and which will render unnecessary steaming of the stave in order to bring it into the desired shape. Staves for barrels and kegs, especially for beer kegs, have heretofore been cut from white oak and then subjected to steaming in order to be bent into the required curvature. White oak, however, at the present time, is very scarce and the steaming process is expensive and time-consuming, while there is available a plentiful supply of thoroughly dried and seasoned lumber which may be utilized for the production of staves. It is an object of the present invention to utilize available lumber, and especially lumber which would otherwise be treated as waste, for the production of staves by a method which is expeditious and inexpensive. The invention will be herein fully described in connection with the accompanying drawings and resides in certain novel features which will be particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

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Patent No. 586323A: Bung-Starter

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Today in 1897, US Patent 586323 A was issued, an invention of Henry Sternkopf, for his “Bung-Starter.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of this invention is to provide improved means for starting or withdrawing bungs from barrels, casks, kegs, and like receptacles.

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Patent No. 1962322A: Cooling Apparatus For Beer Or Other Beverage Contained In Casks

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Today in 1934, US Patent 1962322 A was issued, an invention of Frederick Lewis Staite Murray and Thomas Staite Murray, for their “Cooling Apparatus For Beer or Other Beverage Contained in Casks.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of the invention is the provision of improvements in such apparatus and the invention consists broadly of apparatus comprising a heat interchanger constituting a self contained unit adapted to be mounted in the bung hole or other single hole in the wall of the cask so as to project into the beverage, said heat interchanger being adapted to be connected to an outside refrigerating system whereby a refrigerant is continuously circulated through it from said system, for cooling the beverage.

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Patent No. 2938643A: Closure

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Today in 1960, US Patent 2938643 A was issued, an invention of Milton L. Geiser and George L. Herr, assigned to Armstrong Cork Co., for his “Closure.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application. “This invention relates to a bung, and more particularly to an elastomeric bung to replace the cork bung for insertion in the bung bushing of a barrel.” Which is fairly vague, so here’s quite a bit more explanation:

In order for a bung to function properly for this purpose, it is necessary that it be designed so that it can be driven easily into the bung bushing with existing driving equipment, will be held securely in position in the bung bushing to prevent the pressure developed in the keg from blowing the bung out of its sealing position, and also can be driven on through the bung bushing into the keg when the tap pump is inserted to remove the beer from the keg. Due to the fact that it must be driven into the keg and also due to the fact that the interior of the bung is in engagement with the contents of the keg, it is essential that the bong be produced from materials which will not have a toxic or other deleterious effect on the contents of the keg.

Several attempts have been made to produce bungs from plastic material such as polyethylene, and the general trend has been toward a bung which forms a seal by providing a continuous ledge around the bottom edge of the bung which is exerted against the shoulder or bottom surface of the bung bushing. In order to insure this seal, it is necessary to have a rather heavily reinforced bottom edge on the skirt of the bung which is usually deformed during the insertion of the bung into the keg, which deformation impairs the sealing characteristics of the bung. When this reinforcing ring is compressed during insertion, there is no space provided into which the compressed material can be distributed. Because of this material distribution, the bottom skirt either develops a fold or the reinforced ring assumes an oval shape in the opening in the bung bushing. In the case of the fold, the material forming the bung is usually ruptured, resulting in an improper seal; and in the case of the assumed oval, the bung is cocked in the bushing to such an extent that the top edge of the opening in the bushing gouges sections from the side of the hung. in either instance the sealing qualities of the bung are greatly impaired.

Other plastic bungs have been developed having a scrim of ribs around the skirt of the bung, giving line contact between the bung and the bushing at several points in the bushing. This line contact has not been satisfactory due to the fact that bushings through reuse become scored on their inner or sealing surface. With these score marks, it is not easy to seal the contents of the barrel with a polyethylene bung having several line contact points throughout the depth of the bung. In structures having a plurality of sealing rings around the skirt of the bung, these rings are of necessity of such nature that they serve as reinforcing rings and prevent the expansion of the bung to permit the wall of the bung to be urged against the bushing by the internal pressure on the bung. Here again, with a plurality of reinforcing rings surrounding the bung, there is no opportunity for the material in the rings to be redistributed; therefore, the ring tries to assume an oval shape and in so doing cocks the hung in the opening in the bushing, causing areas near the top of the bushing to be gouged.

Keeping in mind the limitations of the existing bung’s, the hollow, cup-shaped bung of this invention was ‘developed to be easily inserted without deformation ‘of “the bottom of the cylindrical skirt and without cocking of the bung in the opening of the bung bushing, leaving a relatively large area of the skirt of the bung for sealing engagement with the internal surface of the bushing, and at the same time provide suitably reinforced rings for sealing score marks in the bung bushing.

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