Beer In Ads #1321: How Popular Is Beer In America Today?


Monday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
How popular is beer in America today?

A
Beer is now served in about two out of three homes in America.

The number cited in the ad, 62.2%, is confusing. In the text it says it applies to “all Americans” but in the headline it seems to be “households.” It’s also unclear if that number is in relation to other alcoholic beverages: is it two-thirds of drinkers, or two-thirds of all persons, teetotalers included. Most surveys today are of the former kind, and show beer’s percentage hovering around 40%, plus or minus a few percentage points each year.

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Did The FBI Poison Innocent People During Prohibition?

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Why yes, yes they did. Shocking, isn’t it. I wrote about this a few years ago, in Poisoning People During Prohibition: A Disturbing Parable, when Deborah Blum’s book The Poisoner’s Handbook was published. She detailed the story there, as did a few other news outlets at the time. But I bring it up again because one of the YouTube channels my son Porter subscribes to, Alltime Conspiracies, posted a video about this dark tale in our history. It’s entitled Did The FBI Poison Innocent People?, and details how over the final seven years of Prohibition, our government in effect murdered over 10,000 Americans in the name of stopping people from drinking illegal alcohol.

Beer In Ads #1320: What Was The Menu Of The First Thanksgiving Menu?


Sunday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What was the menu of the first Thanksgiving menu?

A
The Pilgrims and their Indian guests had game, seafood, vegetables, and beer.

“According to a written record by an historian of the time” — curiously unnamed — beer was in the table at the first Thanksgiving, in part, because then, as now, “beer was all but the universal beverage.”

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Beer In Ads #1319: What Was Thomas Jefferson’s Attitude On Beer And Brewing?


Saturday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What was Thomas Jefferson’s attitude on beer and brewing?

A
He brought brewers to this country because he wanted to beer to become popular here.

Jefferson also built a brewery at Monticello after his retirement from politics. Before that, his wife Martha brewed 15-gallon batches every two weeks on their Virginia estate. But in his seventies, he hired English brewer Joseph Miller and the pair built a dedicated brewing room and beer cellar at Monticello, where he malted his own grain and grew hops. Jefferson bottled most of his beer, and sealed the bottles with corks. I believe he did say the bit about beer becoming common, in 1816. The full quote is “I wish to see this beverage become common instead of the whiskey which kills one-third of our citizens and ruins their families.” But my favorite Jefferson quote is this. “Beer, if drunk in moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit and promotes health.”

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Beer In Ads #1318: Are Most American Breweries “Large” Or “Small” Businesses


Friday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
Are most American breweries “large” or “small” businesses?

A
Small, individually — although the Brewing Industry as a whole ranks 13th in America.

Interestingly, the way the defined “small breweries” was not barrels brewed or the amount sold, but by the number of employees. They defined a small brewery as one with less than 500 workers, saying the average was less than 200. Using that metric, 409 of the 440-then active breweries they defined as being small. I wonder how that would work out today? I suspect only 2 of the more than 3,000 breweries open today have anything close to 500 employees.

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Beer In Ads #1317: I Can See My Hammock


Thursday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, again from 1944. This was well before the “Beer Belongs” series, but after World War II began. This one is part of an award-winning series of ads they did during the war to help boost morale on the home front, under the umbrella tagline “Morale is a Lot of Little Things.” This was from a group of the morale ads that took the point of view of soldiers and sailors writing home about what they were missing from home. In this one, a sailor is telling his wife or girlfriend Hazel “I can see my hammock now hanging in the orchard—.”

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Beer In Ads #1316: Pitching Horseshoes


Wednesday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, again from 1944. This was well before the “Beer Belongs” series, but after World War II began. This one is part of an award-winning series of ads they did during the war to help boost morale on the home front, under the umbrella tagline “Morale is a Lot of Little Things.” This was from a group of the morale ads that took the point of view of soldiers and sailors writing home about what they were missing from home. In this one, a sailor is writing to his parents, asking them to pass along a message. “Tell Uncle Bert I can still lick him pitching horseshoes.”

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Beer In Ads #1315: We’ll Have To Go Hunting Again


Tuesday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, again from 1944. This was well before the “Beer Belongs” series, but after World War II began. This one is part of an award-winning series of ads they did during the war to help boost morale on the home front, under the umbrella tagline “Morale is a Lot of Little Things.” This was from a group of the morale ads that took the point of view of soldiers and sailors writing home about what they were missing from home. In this one, a soldier is writing to his friend(?) Sam, saying. “We’ll have to go hunting again when I get back —.”

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Beer In Ads #1314: Those Grilled Steaks


Monday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, again from 1944. This was well before the “Beer Belongs” series, but after World War II began. This one is part of an award-winning series of ads they did during the war to help boost morale on the home front, under the umbrella tagline “Morale is a Lot of Little Things.” This was from a group of the morale ads that took the point of view of soldiers and sailors writing home about what they were missing from home. In this one, a sailor is reminiscing about his father’s grilling, and how “Boy did those grilled steaks used to taste swell.”

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Beer In Ads #1313: Picnics In Birch Grove


Sunday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, also from 1944. This was well before the “Beer Belongs” series, but after World War II began. This one is part of an award-winning series of ads they did during the war to help boost morale on the home front, under the umbrella tagline “Morale is a Lot of Little Things.” This was from a group of the morale ads that took the point of view of soldiers and sailors writing home about what they were missing from home. In this one, a soldier, specifically a Marine, is reminiscing about “those swell picnics in Birch Grove,” wherever that might be. Dad, who the letter is addressed, sure has a keen fashion sense: check out that shoes and socks combination he’s sporting.

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