Patent No. 732350A: Brew-House-Apparatus Equipment

patent-logo
Today in 1903, US Patent 732350 A was issued, an invention of Max Henius, for his “Brew-House-Apparatus Equipment.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to an improvement in the equipment of apparatus employed in the department of a brewery known as the brewhouse, which is devoted to the operation of producing the wort by practicing the several generally-stated steps of making the mash, drawing off and hopping and boiling the resultant wort, separating the hopped wort from the hops, and finally cooling the hopped wort preparatory to pumping it into the fermentation-vat.

Hitherto the equipment employed in the manufacture of the wort in the brew-house has involved a multiplicity of apparatus, which has rendered not only the installation of the plant in the matter of building and apparatus but also the maintenance and operation very expensive.

The object of my improvement is to simplify the apparatus equipment for a brewhouse by reducing to the minimum the number of apparatuses for practicing the several necessary steps in wort manufacture by adapting a number of the comparatively few apparatuses provided to perform each several of the steps of the process Where hitherto a separate apparatus was in most or at least some instances required for the practice of each separate step.

Untitled

Beer In Ads #1601: Beer Is A Food


Sunday’s ad is for Ruppert’s Knickerbocker — The Beer That Satisfies — from 1914. The Jacob Ruppert Brewery in New York put out this priceless ad during the inevitable march to prohibition, six years before it was enacted. They were obviously still hoping to turn public opinion with this great copy. “For the good of the public health, it is highly desirable that all prejudice against beer should be removed. This prejudice is held exclusively by people who do not drink beer.” The ad continues by listing great reasons why beer is so awesome. Unfortunately, it didn’t work.

Evening-2BWorld-2B1914

Patent No. 3589270A: Device For Preparing Brewing Malt

patent-logo
Today in 1971, US Patent 3589270 A was issued, an invention of Gisbert Schlimme and Manfred Tschirner, for their “Device For Preparing Brewing Malt.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

A single apparatus for preparing brewing malt in three steps, namely steeping, germinating and drying. A horizontal rotary annular perforated rack arranged in a cylindrical trough is charged with the material to be treated and while placed on the rotating rack is firstly steeped in water introduced into the trough below the rack. After the water has been discharged, the germinating step is performed by introducing air conveyed by a fan into the space between the rack and the bottom of the trough and upwardly through the material, which latter is turned by a horizontal series of vertically arranged turning worms which as a unit may be horizontally moved into the material on the rotating rack, the’ unit of worms being vertically movable into the layer of material and again outwardly therefrom.

During the final drying step, the same fan is used to circulate heated air through the material on the rotating rack, and the dried material then discharged from the rack by a conveyor which may be lowered into the material on the rack. The material is then discharged into a worm conveyor leading to a discharge pipe. As conveyor may serve an endless conveyor with buckets which scoop the material from the rack.

Untitled
Untitled
Untitled

Patent No. 229374A: Apparatus for Purifying Air

patent-logo
Today in 1880, US Patent 229374 A was issued, an invention of Friedrich A. Bruns, for his “Apparatus for Purifying Air.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of this invention is to furnish means for cooling and purifying the atmospheric air which is required for handling beer, ale, wine, and other fermented liquors during fermentation. These liquids are at present transferred by means of air compressing pumps from one cask to another, the air employed for forcing the liquids carrying microscopic organisms and inorganic impurities which impregnate the beer or other liquid and exert an injurious influence thereon. To prevent these organisms from entering the liquids I employ a cooling and purifying apparatus, through which the air is drawn by the air-pump, so that all inorganic and organic impurities are retained and destroyed, and thereby a perfectly pure air supplied for handling the liquids. Fermented liquors treated with air purified in such a manner keep better, become perfectly clear, and are not liable to deterioration.

My invention consists more especially of a cooling-chamber filled with ice and provided with a top screen covered with a layer of cotton or similar material, and of an acid-chamber, into which the air is drawn from the cooling chamber and minutely divided therein by a perforated distributer and screen, to be then conducted off for use. Referring to the drawings, A represents a cooling-chamber, which is filled with ice and provided at the bottom with a discharge pipe for the ice water and with a suitable water-seal.

Untitled

Patent No. PP8812P: Hop Plant Named H87311-3

patent-logo
Today in 1994, US Patent PP8812 P was issued, an invention of Gene Probasco, assigned to John I. Haas, Inc., for his “Hop Plant Named H87311-3.” Here’s the Abstract:

A new variety of hop plant (H87311-3) originating as the result of a controlled cross pollination between an unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. female hop plant No. 832-17 with an unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. male hop plant No. 833-53M, and unique particularly for its cones’ unusually high percentage of alpha acids when compared to its female grandparent variety Galena (unpatented) and otherwise as herein described.

Its grandparent was Galena hops, but it doesn’t appear to have been subsequently named and made available commercially. FreshHops mentions it only briefly with not much more information than the patent application.
Untitled
Untitled

Patent No. 606586A: Malt Stirrer

patent-logo
Today in 1898, US Patent 606586 A was issued, an invention of Jules Alphonse Saladin, for his “Malt Stirrer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

It is my purpose to provide improved mechanism for propelling the turning-over carriage in both directions, for raising and lowering the spiral shovels at the end of each movement of the carriage and before beginning the next movement, and for initiating and terminating those operations of the mechanism which are automatic.

It is my purpose also to improve the construction, arrangement, and operation of the gearing and of those parts which mesh and unmesh the same at different points in the operation of the turning-over mechanism.

Untitled

Untitled Untitled

Untitled Untitled

Untitled
Untitled

Beer In Ads #1599: A Pair Of Pheasants


Saturday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1953. So what’s the going rate for a glass of beer? Why, a pair of pheasants, of course. And this as is a two-fer. There are not one, but two, magic bottles in the ad. Both full glasses shown have only half-empty bottles next to them, and in fact they look nearly full, with only a small amount just about reaching the top of the label gone.

Schlitz-1943-pheasant

Patent No. 3672390A: Draw-Off Tube

patent-logo
Today in 1972, US Patent 3672390 A was issued, an invention of Elbert Gravesteijn, assigned to Amstel Brouwerij, for his “Draw-Off Tube.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The invention relates to a draw-off tube having on its free end a frontally closed tubular extension, to which there is detachably connected a head with an external, radial flange provided with flattened portions on its circumference, and a cylindrical externally screw threaded casing extending axially from said flange and surrounding said tubular extension coaxially, which external screw thread, after insertion of the draw of? tube in a cask of beer or the like, admits of being screwed into the internal screw thread of the bung hole of the cask, a ring valve loaded by a spring, more particularly .by a helical compression spring, being provided in the space between the inner circumference of the cylindrical casing and the outer circumference of the tubular extension, which ring valve is axially displaceable from the seats formed on said circumferences and which ring valve has its outer circumference adapted to free or close the compressed gas passage and has its inner circumference adapted to simultaneously free or close the beer passage formed by a row of radial openings provided in the wall of the tubular extension adjacent its free end, said cylindrical casing being provided with arms downwardly extending therefrom, which arms are detachably connected with a radial flange provided on the extension, which flange supports the compression spring.

Untitled

Patent No. 3327612A: Apparatus For Use In Brewing

patent-logo
Today in 1967, US Patent 3327612 A was issued, an invention of Conrad Lenz, for his “Apparatus for Use in Brewing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates, in general, to brewing apparatus and, in particular, to a new and useful mashing device comprising a unit consisting of a tank for receiving the soaked malt, a feed grinder for the soaked malt and a conveyor for moving the crushed material from the outlet of the feed grinder to a brewing pan or mash copper and of means actuated by the emptying of the unit of the mashed material to discontinue the driving mechanisms.

Untitled