Patent No. 3594995A: Hop-Picking Machine

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3594995 A was issued, an invention of Thomas Lee Evans and Charlie J. Soules, for their “Hop-Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to hop-picking machines and, more particularly, to novel, improved machines for field picking hops from vines hanging from overhead wires or trellises or other supports.

We have now developed a novel, improved machine for filed picking hops which does not have the drawbacks of machines heretofore proposed for this purpose and accordingly represents a significant advance in the art over the latter. The novel hop-picking machines of the present invention are preferably self-propelled and, generally speaking, include graspers for engaging the lower ends of the vines and maintaining them in picking position as they move through the machine, picking cuts for stripping the hops from the vines, a conveyor arrangement for carrying the hops away, a cutter for severing the vines to free them from the supports, and an arrangement for expelling picked vines from the machine.

One of the important advantages of the novel hoppicking machine described herein is that, being self-propelled, it can be maneuvered through a field more easily and much faster than the cumbersome pushed-type” picker described in the Horst patents identified above and is accordingly capable of picking hops at a much higher rate. Another advantage, also resulting in increased capacity, is that the machines of the present invention are capable of picking two rows of vines simultaneously in contrast to the patented Horst machines which are single-row pickers.

In the Horst machines, the vines are pulled down through the machine as they are picked. Accordingly, a field hand must accompany the machine and cut the vines free from the trellises as they move into the machine. Applicant’s novel machine in contrast does not depend on downward movement of the vines they are picked; and, moreover, it is provided with its own cutter for severing the vines to free them from the trellises. Accordingly, the necessity of employing hand labor for this purpose is eliminated by the present invention together with the attendant expense.

In conjunction with the foregoing, another novel and important feature ofthe present invention is that the picking cats are vertically adjustable. This makes it possible to quickly adjust the cats as the heights of the overhead supports change so that the vines can be picked clean up to the supports.

Another important feature of the present invention is a novel conveyor for the hops stripped from the vines which normally discharges into a truck or the like but can be employed to store picked hops so that the machine can continue to pick while a loaded truck is being replaced or the machine is turning at the end ofa row, etc. In similar circumstances the picking operation would have be stopped in heretofore proposed machines such as those .described in .the Horst patents, for example.

Yet another important feature of the present invention is a novel grasper line for holding the vines in the proper position for picking in which the grapsers are moved at a speed matching the ground speed of the picking machine. Further, the grapscr line is configured to compensate for sagging vinesupporting wires, thereby ensuring that the vines are grasped at the proper location.

Other important features of the invention are a novel cutter mechanism for severing the vines and freeing them from the trellises and a novel mechanism for expelling the picked vines from the machine. Yet another novel and important feature of the invention is that the operating mechanisms are powered entirely by hydraulic motors, substantially eliminating belt and chain and similar drives. This makes the novel machines disclosed herein significantly simpler than comparable prior art harvesters.

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Patent No. 3332748A: Extraction Of Hop Bitters From Beer With Iso-Octane Using Synchronized Pulses In A Helical Coil

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Today in 1967, US Patent 3332748 A was issued, an invention of Jack Albert Spicer and Max William Betts, for their “Extraction of Hop Bitters from Beer With Iso-Octane Using Synchronized Pulses in a Helical Coil.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to the extraction of chemical substances from liquid mixtures and in particular to the extraction of such substances from complex mixtures for purposes of analysis.

In the analysis of a complex mixture, it may be desired to separate one or more constituents of the mixture, by liquid/liquid extraction methods, in order to obtain a relatively simple solution, for example for spectrographic analysis. Thus, for example, it has been proposed to extract hop bitter substances from brewers wort or beer by liquid/liquid extraction with iso-octane, whereupon the solution of the hop bitter substances may be analyzed by ultra-violet spectrographic analysis. The present invention provides an extraction process suitable for use in the separation of desired compounds from such mixtures.

According to the invention, a process for the extraction of a chemical substance from a liquid mixture comprises feeding the liquid mixture and a solvent for the desired chemical substance in synchronized pulses through a horizontally disposed coiled tube, and separating the residual liquid mixture from the solution of the desired chemical substance in the solvent. Preferably the coiled tube is helically coiled.

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Patent No. 2645893A: Hop Picking Machine

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Today in 1953, US Patent 2645893 A was issued, an invention of Emil Clemens Horst Jr., for his “Hop Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

It is therefore an object of my invention to provide a hop picking machine especially designed as a portable unit and especially useful in accommodating variations in the positioning and size of the growing hop vines and also designed with a wide degree of latitude for accommodating variations in the operation of the machine itself.

Another object of the invention is to provide a generally improved hop picking machine.

A further object of the invention is to provide a hop picking machine of the field harvesting type in which substantially all of the hops stripped from the vines are retained in the machine and are not lost upon the ground.

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Patent No. 3195445A: Bale Press

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Today in 1965, US Patent 3195445 A was issued, an invention of Sidney S. Meisler, for his “Bale Press.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to baling presses and more particularly to a novel baling press for forming bales and applying a number of tie wires therewith.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide apparatus for recompressing hops into cylindrical bales confined against expansion by plural bands supplied by a powered strapping machine, thus materially increasing the speed with which finished bales may be completed and therefore materially decreasing the cost of so doing.

A further object of the present invention lies in the provision of an improved pair of complemental shaping dies by means of which a band may be caused to encircle a bale contained in the fully closed mating dies by passing the band thereabout from one side of the bale press.

Another object of the present invention lies in the provision of an improved bale press having a pair of complemental shaping dies which, when in said mating position, provide complemental ways through which bale banding material may be passed by a power strapping machine.

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Patent No. 244695A: Process Of Purification Of Hops For Brewing Purposes

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Today in 1881, US Patent 244695 A was issued, an invention of James Walkek, for his “Process of Purification of Hops for Brewing Purposes.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The mode or process of purifying hops for brewing purposes — to wit — by steeping the hops in water at or approximating a temperature of 100 Fahrenheit until the supernatant liquor ceases to be turbid, then drawing off the Water, and finally removing the thus purified hops direct to the brew-kettle, substantially as set forth.

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Patent No. 860390A: Hop-Jack

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Today in 1907, US Patent 860390 A was issued, an invention of George Edward Laubenheimer, for his “Hop-Jack.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The Object of this invention is to provide a hop jack in which the screen or strainer is so constructed that the wort quickly drains oh and the hops are quickly and, thoroughly sparged and removed from the greater portion of the surface of the screen by mechanical means, thereby obviating n great deal of the manual lahoi’ usually required where a lalsc bottom is employed.

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Patent No. 4160787A: Process For Extracting Bitter Flavoring Principles From Hops

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Today in 1979, US Patent 4160787 A was issued, an invention of Manfred Moll, Roland Flayeux, Pierre Dicesare, and Bernard Gross, for their “Process For Extracting Bitter Flavoring Principles From Hops.” Here’s the Abstract:

A process is described for converting the α- and β-acids of hops into the iso-α acids for use as a bitter flavoring principle ingredient for beers. The α-acids content of the hops is directly isomerized to the iso-α-acid, the bitter principle ingredient. The β acids in the hops extract is transformed to the α acid either after a direct separation step before the α-acid isomerization or the residual β-acids, after the isomerization, are then transformed and the resultant α-acid is isomerized. The β-acid transformation results from a radiation activation followed by an oxidation step with a per – acid.

The isomerization of the α-acid to the iso-α-acid is accomplished by reaction with an alkaline earth metal ethoxide preferably the magnesium ethoxide.

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Patent No. 2772975A: Injecting Of Hops In The Brewing Of Beer

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Today in 1956, US Patent 2772975 A was issued, an invention of Frank Otto Rickers, assigned to the Geo Wiedemann Brewing Co. Inc., for his “Injecting Of Hops In The Brewing Of Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

It is an object of the present invention to provide for the addition of the hops to a brew kettle in a manner such that the hops will be uniformly distributed through the brew and for greatly increased control over this step of the brewing so any deteriorating effect is prevented by storing in cold temperature so that the loss of hops up the flue will be minimized. Thus, it is an object of the present invention to provide process to the end that each successive brew will have undergone the same length of time in the cooking of the same amount of hops.

Briefly, in the practice of my invention I provide means for insuring that the hops, as they are added to the kettle, are wetted down and caused to enter below the surface of the brew in a rather closely confined area and I provide for a localized ebullition and circulation of the brew such that the lumps or fragments of hops are carried by this localized ebullition and circulation down into the bottom of the kettle whence they are uniformly distributed by the general circulation in the kettle.

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Patent No. 2893870A: Hopping Of Beer

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Today in 1959, US Patent 2893870 A was issued, an invention of Kurt Ritter, for his “Hopping of Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The invention relates to improvements in beer brewing and more particularly to an improved method of hopping beer.

The brewing of beer comprises generally the following steps: Ground malt is mashed with water, and the obtained malt solution (first wort) is freed from the malt residues (spent grains). Subsequently, the wort is boiled with addition of the required amount of hops and then separated from the spent hops and fermented with yeast. The hops are generally added as such or in coarsely disintegrated state to the Wort.

Said procedure has the drawback that, on boiling, only about one-third to one-fourth of the bitter principle (resins), contained in the hops, passes into the wort; in addition, a certain amount of the resins, e.g. about 3 to 7 percent, is lost in further processing (fermentation and storage) by precipitation.

So far, attempts to eliminate said drawbacks have not met with satisfactory results. Recently, it has been proposed to extract the resins by subjecting the hops in water or aqueous solutions to ultrasonic irradiation and to introduce the thus obtained resin extract into the boiling wort instead of hopping with natural hops. Said method, however, must be carried out with expensive and delicate devices, the operation of which requires high energy cost, and which are therefore uneconomical for commercial purposes. The preparation of such resin extracts by means of ultrasonic irradiation takes considerable time, for instance 1 to 2 hours and more. During this prolonged treatment, undesired side reactions may take place which may affect the brewing process, for instance with respect to the uniformly fine and pleasant taste of the produced beer.

It is a principal object of the invention to provide a simple, reliable, and economic hopping procedure.

It is another object of the invention to provide a method by which the required amount of hops is considerably reduced and nonetheless a beer of uniform excellent quality and taste is produced.

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Patent No. PP8824P: Hop Plant Named “H87203-1″

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Today in 1994, US Patent PP8824 P was issued, an invention of Gene Probasco, assigned to John I. Haas, Inc., for his “Hop Plant Named ‘H87203-1.'” It’s almost identical to the previous patent for the hop plant named H87207-2. Here’s the Abstract for this one:

A new variety of hop plant (H87203-1) originating as the result of a controlled corss pollination between unpatented Galena female hop plant with unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. (Haas) male hop plant No. 833-53M, and unique particularly for its cones’ unusually high percentage of beta acids when compared to its female parent variety Galena (unpatented) and otherwise as herein described.

It’s been 21 years since this other hop variety was patented. Did it ever get its own name? Does anybody know?
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