Patent No. 732122A: Barrel-Tap

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Today in 1903, US Patent 732122 A was issued, an invention of Adolph Schneider, for his “Brew-House-Apparatus Equipment.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The invention relates, primarily, to barrel taps more, particularly intended for use in drawing or transferring effervescing liquid, such as beer, from one receptacle to another, but which can also be used for drafting liquids.

The objects of the invention are to construct a barrel-tap which can be readily applied to or removed from a receptacle without any great inconvenience or trouble and which when applied to a receptacle will enable the liquid contained in the receptacle to be drawn therefrom without liability of waste, to effectually pr I’ll; leakage in applying the tap to the receptacle, to enable air or other fluid pressure to be applied to the receptacle as the liquid is withdrawn therefrom without change in the tap, thereby maintaining the requisite amount of pressure in a receptacle for properly transferring the liquid under a predetermined pressure, to simplify the construction and improve the operation of barrel-taps, and to construct a barrel-tap which as a Whole will be very compact, easily applied, and effective and reliable in use.

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Patent No. 192539A: Improvement In Beer-Coolers

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Today in 1877, US Patent 192539 A was issued, an invention of John Staugler, for his “Improvement in Beer-Coolers.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention consists in the peculiar construction of’ a cooling-box, resting on a frame or horse, with a rounded cover hinged to the box.

The shape of the box, and especially the cover, follows the form of the cask as closely as convenient, and leaves only in the lower part of the box sufficient space to put in a few pieces of ice, for the purpose of keeping the contents of the cask cool while on draft.

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Patent No. 857843A: Beer-Service Apparatus

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Today in 1907, US Patent 857843 A was issued, an invention of William F. Stark, for his “Beer-Service Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to and has for an object to provide an improved beer service apparatus.

In the dispensing of liquids, more particularly malt beverages, the casks containing the same are usually stored in the cellar, and in the tap room, situated at some place on a higher plane than the casks, there are suitable faucets connected to the casks by a series of piping, the casks also being connected with a suitable pressure device, as for instance, a source of compressed air supply whereby the beverage is forced to the faucets and is there drawn as occasion may demand, the presence of the compressed air preventing the volatilization of the beverage and the escape of the entrained gas. During those portions of the day when the beverage is not being drawn from the faucets it will remain in the pipes between the casks and the faucets, and should the pipes have cooling coils connected with them, the beverage will become unduly chilled.

It is one of the objects of my present invention to provide means whereby the beverage may be returned from the pipes into the casks and there retained until it is again desired to force it to the faucets.

My present improvement makes use of the method of returning liquid under pressure to its receptacle by counter pressure and gravity, by employing means for connecting the draw faucet at its point of delivery to the counter pressure.

The passage of malt beverages through pipes has a tendency to gum and coat the inside of the pipes, rendering the same foul, and requiring frequent purging to keep them in a proper hygienic condition. The present improvement embodies means whereby the pipes may be filled with water for preventing them from becoming dry after the time the beverage has been returned to the cask and during the time the pipes remain idle, and also for the purpose of flushing and washing the pipes. This can be done by the employment of the present improvement without uncoupling the pipes from their connection with the casks or with the draw tubes which are ordinarily employed for establishing communication with the cask, and this while using a draw faucet of ordinary form.

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Patent No. 703206A: Beer-Tapping Apparatus

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Today in 1902, US Patent 703206 A was issued, an invention of Patrick H. Keefe, for his “Beer-Tapping Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in beer-tapping apparatus wherein an air-supply is in communication with the cask or barrel containing the beer or like liquid, and has for its object to provide means for furnishing a constant supply of air to the liquid, so that the latter may be drawn on through a pipe, which conducts the same to a suitable and convenient point.

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Patent No. 584863A: Beer-Tapping Device

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Today in 1897, US Patent 584863 A was issued, an invention of Jay W. Farmoff, for his “Beer-Tapping Device.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Our invention has for its object to produce an efficient tapping device which is simple and durable in construction, reliable in action, and which can be conveniently operated.

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Patent No. 3257033A: Beer Dispensing Apparatus

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Today in 1966, US Patent 3257033 A was issued, an invention of Reginald W. Stott, for his “Beer Dispensing Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to a combined apparatus for the semi-automatic dispensing of a predetermined quantity of liquid and to the simultaneous counting of the number of such predetermined quantities of liquid which have been dispersed. A subsidiary aspect of this invention is a valve control means for use in that apparatus, and particularly a switch arrangement associated with said valve. The apparatus is particularly suited for the dispensing of effervescent liquids, and more particularly for the dispensing of beer.

It is necessary, in the dispensing of effervescent or gas charged liquids such as, for example, beer, to dispense such liquid, even by relatively inexperienced help, in such a manner that uniform results are obtained. It is also necessary that such dispensing means be capable of being set quickly and easily for the drawing of varying amounts of such liquids, i.e., for the drawing of two, or more, different sizes of drafts. Furthermore, it is desirable to have means associated with such dispensing means to count the total number of each size of drafts which have been drawn.

It was proposed accomplishing these ends by the use of an auxiliary storage tank where the required amount of beer was stored prior to dispensing. This proved undesirable, since this auxiliary storage, and the means used to dispense the beer therefrom, tended to have a detrimental effect on the delicate quality of the beer.

A prime feature, therefore, of the present invention, is the provision of apparatus whereby beer and similar liquids may be dispensed by relatively inexperienced help, in such a manner that uniform results are obtained.

A further feature is the provision of means whereby the apparatus may be quickly and easily set for the automatic dispensing of two or more different quantities, i.e., two or more different sizes of drafts.

A still further feature of this invention is the provision of counter means for the cumulative totalling of the number of each size of drafts which have been dispensed.

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Patent No. 1029727A: Tap

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Today in 1912, US Patent 1029727 A was issued, an invention of George Stroh, for his “Tap.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to taps and bushings and more particularly to that class wherein the bushing is permanently secured in a beer keg or barrel. and-a tap, so called, is arranged for coupling therewith. In such devices it is desirable that the tap be so constructed that it may be readily coupled with the bushing, and -a tight joint made therewith without the use of tools, as the coupling of the parts is usually effected when the barrel or keg is in a store room or cellar or other dark place and as the help available is usually unskilled. Furthermore it is of great advantage to have the tap constitute a single structure bodily removable from the bushing, and so arranged that the packing rings and like parts which form an essential feature of the device are not readily lost.

This invention relates more particularly to a construction of a tap sleeve whereby the coupling with a barrel bushing is readily effected by the use of the hand alone and whereby there are no loose tap parts which may be shaken off or otherwise displaced.

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Patent No. 1065233A: Keg-Tapping Device

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Today in 1913, US Patent 1065233 A was issued, an invention of Friedrick Gittinger, for his “Keg-Tapping Device.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to devices for tapping kegs and barrels, and has especial reference to devices for tapping kegs of beer, and has for its object’ the provision of an improved construction of tapping devices comprising a bung having an integral web provided with an opening and segment-al slots, rotatable valve members mounted on the two sides of said web and secured together for simultaneous rotation over said segmental slots, and a nozzle member adapted to enter and be locked in engagement with said bung and provided with means for rotating the valve members when moving into locking position.

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Patent No. 1099910A: Beer-Cooler

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Today in 1914, US Patent 1099910 A was issued, an invention of William J. Bocker and Hermenia A. Bocker, for their “Beer-Cooler.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Our invention relates to improvements in beer coolers, and more particularly to that type of cooler used in connection with dispensing apparatus.

In beer coolers now in use, the beer is caused to run through a coil or coils of pipe with which ice is in direct contact for cooling the beer while it is passing through the coil or coils, but coolers of this kind are objectionable for the reason that they cannot be readily cleaned without resorting to the use of steam forcibly passed through the coil or coils thereof and also for the reason that the beer cannot be maintained at an even temperature.

It is the object of our invention to overcome the above mentioned objections, and to do so in a simple, efficacious and inexpensive manner. To this end the invention consists in the provision of a cooling chamber for the re! caption of a keg or kegs of beer which extends up into the dispensing bar and which is equipped with an ice receptacle which is adapted to contain ice and maintain the temperature evenly at every point within said cooling chamber and in directing the dispensing pipe or pipes from the beer keg or kegs directly to the dispensing faucet or faucets Without leading them out of said cooling chamber.

Our invention further consists in so arranging the dispensing pipe or pipes that they are easily accessible and readily cleaned internally by passing a brush or any other suitable tool through the same, said pipe or pipes being in a straight line to permit of such action.

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Patent No. 4838419A: Keg Board

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Today in 1989, US Patent 4838419 A was issued, an invention of Ferdinand Weits, William F. Mekelburg and Marc R. Latour, assigned to the Adolph Coors Company, for their “Keg Board.” Here’s the Abstract:

A keg board for use in stacking beer kegs and the like in an upright orientation during storage and transporation of the kegs comprising: a generally planar surface for engaging and supporting a generally planar end surface of each keg; and pockets operatively associated with the planar surface for limiting relative lateral shifting movement of the kegs such as caused by shocks and vibration associated with transporting of the kegs.

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