Patent No. 6820775B2: Gas-Pressurized Beverage Keg

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Today in 1966, US Patent 6820775 B2 was issued, an invention of Klaus Meike and Hans Helmut Reichmann, assigned to Schafer Werke Gmbh, for their Electric “Gas-Pressurized Beverage Keg.” Here’s the Abstract:

A beverage container has a cylindrical lower side wall and floor defining a lower beverage chamber and centered on an axis, a cylindrical upper side wall and upper wall centered on the axis and defining an upper pressurized-gas chamber, and an annular partition having an outer edge welded to an upper edge of the lower side wall and a lower edge of the upper side wall and a center part closely juxtaposed with the upper wall of the upper chamber. A tap assembly mounted on the upper-chamber upper wall has a riser tube projecting through the partition center part into a lower region of the lower chamber. An upper protective ring is fitted to the upper part and to the valve assembly and a lower protective ring is fitted to the lower part. The rings and side walls have the same diameters.

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Patent No. 3286385A: Electric Beer Tap Handle

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Today in 1966, US Patent 3286385 A was issued, an invention of Charles G. Tate Jr., for his Electric “Beer Tap Handle.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a beer tarp handle with an electrically operated display device.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a beer tap handle with a movable display device that is electrically driven.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an electrically powered beer tap handle that can readily be converted from a rotating to an oscillating display device or to a stationery light.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a beer tap handle that is simple in construction and easy and economical to manufacture and assemble.

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Patent No. 486485A: Pressure Regulator

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Today in 1892, US Patent 486485 A was issued, an invention of Joseph Lehr and Joseph Bodani, for their “Pressure Regulator.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

Our present invention has for its objects to provide a device adapted to maintain an even pressure of air, gas, or other fluid in a chamber or receptacle supplied from a suitable source, which pressure is capable of easy regulation, and though it is especially adapted for maintaining an even and regular pressure on the beer in a keg from which it is being drawn said device is obviously capable of use in other connections and for other purposes; and to these ends it consists in certain improvements in construction and combinations of parts, all as will be hereinafter fully described, and the novel features pointed out particularly in the claims at the end of this specification.

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Patent No. 775780A: Art Of Brewing

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Today in 1904, US Patent 775780 A was issued, an invention of Joseph Schneible, for his “Art Of Brewing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

This invention relates particularly to the preparation of beer-wort, and has for its object to make-it possible to produce with certainty a wort of definite character, with reference particularly to the relationship between sugar and non-sugar, maltodextrins and dextrin, etc.

According to the methods of brewing now practiced the production of a wort of a definite or the best character in so far as it is dependent upon the relative amounts present in it of the different starch derivatives is practically impossible. This is largely due to the fact that the malt mash is subjected for a time long enough to permit conversion of the starch to take place to varying temperatures without so controlling the temperatures as to obtain the different starch derivatives in the desired proportions. This variation of temperature necessarily results from delivering, as is the customary practice, the cooked unmalted cereal mash or other heating medium,”such as hot water, which in some systems of brewing is used to raise the temperature of the malt mash, at substantially the boiling temperature to the mash-tub, which already contains the peptonized malt mash, which is at a temperature much below the boiling-point. The stream of boiling-hot cooked mash raises the temperature of the adjacent portions of the malt mash to a heat approximating its own temperature,which unduly elevated temperature continues long enough for conversion of the starch obviously where the hot cereal to begin. mash or other heating medium is thus introduced into the malt mash it is not only impossible to regulate the temperature to which portions of the malt mash are thus raised, but it is also impossible to regulate the quantity of the malt mash which has its temperature thus unduly raised, and the degree and extent Serial No. 186,592. (No specimens) of conversion or saccharification is therefore impossible of regulation under such methods.

According to the present invention the temperature of the peptonized malt mash is raised to the proper converting degree by the heat of the cooked unmalted cereal mash or other heating medium; but the attainment of the desired temperature .,is effected in so short a space of time that no reaction at other temperatures will take place, the contact of the malt mash at the peptonizing temperature with the substantially boiling hot cooked mash or other heating medium being only momentary, or rather the thorough mixture of the two being so quickly effected that no undesired reaction takes place. The contact or mingling of the malt mash and cooked mash or other heating medium preferably takes place as the two mashes or the malt mash and heating medium are moving on together in a comparatively small stream, and no portion of the malt mash remains in contact for any appreciable length of time with the cooked mash or other heating medium while the latter is at boiling temperature. In other words, the malt mash is raised to the desired converting temperature without subjecting the malt mash to reaction at any temperature other than that which is predetermined.

It will be obvious that the invention can be practiced in different ways and with different forms of apparatus, the most convenient and practicable mode of practicing the invention being to thoroughly mingle the malt mash and the hot cooked mash or other heating medium while in movement from the respective tanks or sources of supply tothe common mash-tub or strainer-tub, so that the desired converting temperature is attained at once in the commingled mashes or commingled malt mash and heating medium. After being so mingled the combined liquor is allowed to stand for the usual period of time required for conversion.

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Patent No. 2180828A: Beer Return Device

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Today in 1939, US Patent 2180828 A was issued, an invention of Charles Horansky and Frank J. Suchanek, for their “Beer Return Device.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

This form of device is intended for use with kegs or barrels containing dry contents and to accommodate barrels or kegs containing liquids. The turn-rod 28 is supplied with an inner disk, as shown by Fig. 7, which is secured to the head of said barrel or keg. In Fig. 8 a further modification is shown, and consists of a series of arms 32 on the turn-rod 28 and having outer angular ends in which set-screws 327 are mounted and adapted to take over the end of a barrel or keg and the set-screws caused to engage the body of said barrel or keg ahead of an end hoop, and there by provide a means of securement. The last device set forth can be used alone or in combination with the other devices. Of course the barrel or keg is permitted by all the devices to have a free rotatable movement, which is Very desirable. When the said holding arm 26 is arranged against the end of a barrel or keg, the flat links 24 are positioned as shown in Fig.2, the joints of said links being so constructed as to prevent them from being thrown forward beyond a predetermined point and the rearmost link from being depressed below the horizontal plane of the next link to which it is attached.

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Patent Nos. 805305A & 805306A: Air Filter

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Today in 1905, both US Patent 805305 A and US Patent 805306 A were issued, and both are related inventions of Albert Lieber, under the same name: “Air Filter.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims for the first one:

The object of this invention is to provide an improved construction of air-filter for filtering compressed air and removing from it impurities as well as chemically treating it during its passage through the filter.

The use to which I. have put this filter is for pitching the interior of beer-kegs and the like for blowing and spreading the warm pitch upon the internal surface of a keg by compressed air passing through this filter. In such case the bacteria and germs in the air will be embedded in the pitch and thus affect the beer, impairing its preserving qualities as well as its taste. It is therefore found very important by me that the compressed air used for the purpose mentioned be rendered chemically pure by passing the air through medicated cotton, thus arresting the particles of dust, microbes, germs, and the like. Beer-kegs treated in this way can be used immediately after being pitched and after prior use without the necessity of treating the kegs as heretofore.

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And here’s a description of the claims for the second patent:

The chief feature of this invention consists of means for compressing the cotton or filtering material to the degree best suited for the chemical through which the air passed through the device is being treated.

The purpose of the invention, therefore, is to more thoroughly arrest the bacteria and germs of the air in the filter before the same passes through the filter. I have used it for pitching the interior of beer-kegs, the air being passed through the filter and compressed for blowing and spreading warm pitch upon the internal surface of the keg. This device prevents the bacteria and germs from the air entering the pitch.

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Patent No. 637738A: Device For Handling Beer Barrels

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Today in 1899, US Patent 637738 A was issued, an invention of Jacob Elmer Ludwig, for his “Device For Handling Beer Barrels.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

This form of device is intended for use with kegs or barrels containing dry contents and to accommodate barrels or kegs containing liquids. The turn-rod 28 is supplied with an inner disk, as shown by Fig. 7, which is secured to the head of said barrel or keg. In Fig. 8 a further modification is shown, and consists of a series of arms 32 on the turn-rod 28 and having outer angular ends in which set-screws 327 are mounted and adapted to take over the end of a barrel or keg and the set-screws caused to engage the body of said barrel or keg ahead of an end hoop, and there by provide a means of securement. The last device set forth can be used alone or in combination with the other devices. Of course the barrel or keg is permitted by all the devices to have a free rotatable movement, which is Very desirable. When the said holding arm 26 is arranged against the end of a barrel or keg, the flat links 24 are positioned as shown in Fig.2, the joints of said links being so constructed as to prevent them from being thrown forward beyond a predetermined point and the rearmost link from being depressed below the horizontal plane of the next link to which it is attached.

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Patent No. 3773222A: Beer Yeast Dosing Installation

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Today in 1973, US Patent 3773222 A was issued, an invention of Erich Fiebinger, assigned to Draft Systems, Inc., for his beer yeast “Dosing Installation.” Here’s the Abstract:

A dosing system for continuously dosing and dispensing the respective quantities of auxiliary filtering substances to be added in connection with a settling filtration to a cloudy liquid, especially beer, for the cooling and yeast sediments, according to which for dispensing an auxiliary filtering substance for the cooling sediments as well as an auxiliary filtering for the yeast sediment there is provided one dosing device each equipped with a flow meter while both devices which are directly connected to the cloudy liquid conveying conduit are preceded by a flow meter and a device for measuring the total cloudiness of the liquid and by a measuring device provided with a heating zone for measuring the yeast sediment in the cloudy liquid conveying conduit. The dosing installation includes a control device for controlling the dosing devices in conformity with the cloudiness measured by the respective devices.

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Patent No. 2575658A: Beer Faucet

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Today in 1951, US Patent 2575658 A was issued, an invention of Roger Del Nero, for his “Beer Faucet.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

Beer has always presented problems in dispensing. It contains carbon dioxide gas, which in a sealed keg is held in solution. Upon tapping of the keg, however, it is necessary to apply pressure from an external source to keep the gas dissolved within the keg, this pressure ranging, for example, from 25 to 35 pounds. It would be desirable to retain the gas in solution until the beer is dispensed from the faucet. It is here, however, that many problems arise, and these will be mentioned briefly.

For example, the faucet is of course exposed to room temperature, and yet should be chilled if a good glass of beer is to be drawn, since the relative warmth of the faucet may cause excessive foaming of the beer by release of the gas. Keeping a faucet at a single low temperature is practically impossible, because it might be inactive for a time, during a slack period of sales, and become relatively warm.

At other times, continuous drawing will keep it chilled. All this can happen during the use of a single keg. After a period of inactivity, good bartenders spit the faucet before drawing the next glass, that is, they clear the faucet of beer trapped therein that may be stale, and of escaped gases rising to the faucet through the supply lines and coils. The loss of good beer through the drain, before the faucet is again dispensing beer properly, has been considerable.

Other factors affect the drawing of beer, too, as for instance, agitation of the beer within the keg when tapping, the melting of ice in the coil box, and change of temperature in a mechanically cooled system.

From the above, it is seen that merely putting a keg under a pressure previously determined as best will not in itself result in each and every glass drawn having no more than a proper amount of foam, even though the particular bartender may be fully expert in his work. This has been the problem, and to meet it, the art has concerned itself with devising a faucet that can be adjusted by the bartender to meet varying conditions experienced from glass to glass. All such faucets as have been commercially practicable have been of a two-valve type, having a main valve operated by the usual knob lever, and a second valve separately adjustable for the purpose of restricting the passageway through the faucet in varying degree.

So far as I am aware, however, the faucets heretofore devised, and aimed at conquering the drawing. This is when it is most important to do so, because he does not note any change in the characteristics of the beer until he actually begins drawing. If he has to stop drawing, make an adjustment of the flow control valve, test the new position, and perhaps stop and make still another adjustment, valuable time is lost. 01′, if he attempts an adjustment without stopping, he must relinquish the knob lever. Usually, by the time he reaches the adjustment lever, the glass is overflowing.

Additionally, the provision of faucets of this type has brought forth an undesirable condition, in that many of them contain so many parts that they not only can get out of order easily, but what is more important, perhaps, the volume of parts, and the comparatively large size of the faucet, affects adversely proper chilling thereof, and tends to bring forth one of the very conditions intended to be overcome.

I have had in mind, then, the provision of a faucet that can be small and will have less parts than other faucets intended to accomplish the same purpose; that will permit an adjusted setting of the flow control valve, to be made on installation, taking into consideration such factors as beer temperature desired, length and size of supply lines and coils, and the pressure applied to the keg; that will additionally permit the bartender to make further adjustment of said valve during actual drawing, to meet varying abnormal and unexpected conditions not expected at the time the drawing of the glass began, such further adjustment to be made immediately and without loss of control of the knob lever; and that will permit spitting of the faucet without loss of good beer.

To this end, the presently preferred form of my invention embodies, mainly, a faucet having a main valve operated by the conventional knob lever; a flow control valve; an adjusting sleeve that effects an adjusted, normal setting of the flow control valve, usually made at installation, this means being capable of being locked; and a stem that extends from the flow control valve and is engageable by the main valve, whereby the bartender can make a further adjustment of the flow control valve during drawing by operation of the knob lever.

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Patent No. 3848631A: Beer Keg Protective Device

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Today in 1974, US Patent 3848631 A was issued, an invention of Merton R. Fallon, assigned to Draft Systems, Inc., for his “Beer Keg Protective Device.” Here’s the Abstract:

The safety device is disposable in the gas line connecting between a gas source under pressure and a tapping device installed in a keg. The safety device includes a valve housing carrying a spring biased axially movable piston including a stem and an axially adjustable element on the upstream side of the stem, the element and piston having axial passages. On the downstream side of the piston, a slit valve is provided. In use, gas flowing into the valve through the passages in the element and piston flows into the keg through the slit valve. Upon an increase in gas line pressure above a predetermined pressure, the gas acts on the piston to displace it in an upstream direction against the bias of the spring to seal the stem against the element and preclude further ingress of gas into the keg. When keg pressure is relived as by drawing beer from the keg, the spring returns the piston to open the gas passage through the valve at the predetermined pressure. The gas check valve precludes backflow of liquid and gas through the gas passage.

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