Beer In Ads #1629: The Goodness Of Malt & A Match


Sunday’s ad is another one for the Barley and Malt Institute, also from 1959. This is the sixth ad I have from the now defunct trade group for barley growers. In this one a man sitting a bar, with the evening newspaper and bowl of pretzels in front of him, lights a match to fire up his cigarette as he glances to his left, watching the glass of beer he ordered as it’s just about finished being filled. It looks like the perfect way to end a workday, circa 1959.

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Beer In Ads #1628: The Goodness Of Malt While Boating


Saturday’s ad is for the Barley and Malt Institute, from 1959. This is the fifth ad I have from the now defunct trade group for barley growers. In this one a woman is pouring a beer on the dock for a man sitting in boat of uncertain size, though it’s probably relatively small, and trying to grab the glass (glass?!?) mug even before she’s finished filling it. The tagline is similar to other Malt Institute ads, suggesting it was a series of ads: “Fun-Flavors your favorite beer—healthfully.” I’m not even sure that quite makes sense.

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Patent No. 3896001A: Malting Processes

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Today in 1973, US Patent 3896001 A was issued, an invention of James Barrett, Brian Heys Kirsop, and Godfrey Henry Oliver Palmer, assigned to Brewing Patents Ltd., for their “Malting Processes.” Here’s the Abstract:

A process for the production of malt comprises removing a part of the husk of the barley, steeping the barley, treating the barley with aqueous mineral acid and with gibberellic acid, and allowing the barley to germinate. The combination of treatment steps is claimed to improve the rate of germination.

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Patent No. 4277505A: Process For The Malting Of Grain

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Today in 1981, US Patent 4277505 A was issued, an invention of Simon B. Simpson, for his “Process for the Malting of Grain.” Here’s the Abstract:

Germination of cereal grain in malting is carried out by passing steeped grain to and through a series of six closed spaced discrete vessels in succession. The grain is maintained in each vessel for about a day and in each vessel is subjected to an upward flow of humidified at temperated air. The grain is turned either in a vessel or through transference to the next vessel. Transference from one vessel to the other is carried out by discharging the grain from each vessel along a lower conveyor to an elevator which raises the grain to an upper conveyor that discharges the grain down into the next vessel. Grain leaves the last vessel of the series as green malt and then passes to a malt kiln where it is dried to a desired moisture level.

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Patent No. 3589270A: Device For Preparing Brewing Malt

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3589270 A was issued, an invention of Gisbert Schlimme and Manfred Tschirner, for their “Device For Preparing Brewing Malt.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

A single apparatus for preparing brewing malt in three steps, namely steeping, germinating and drying. A horizontal rotary annular perforated rack arranged in a cylindrical trough is charged with the material to be treated and while placed on the rotating rack is firstly steeped in water introduced into the trough below the rack. After the water has been discharged, the germinating step is performed by introducing air conveyed by a fan into the space between the rack and the bottom of the trough and upwardly through the material, which latter is turned by a horizontal series of vertically arranged turning worms which as a unit may be horizontally moved into the material on the rotating rack, the’ unit of worms being vertically movable into the layer of material and again outwardly therefrom.

During the final drying step, the same fan is used to circulate heated air through the material on the rotating rack, and the dried material then discharged from the rack by a conveyor which may be lowered into the material on the rack. The material is then discharged into a worm conveyor leading to a discharge pipe. As conveyor may serve an endless conveyor with buckets which scoop the material from the rack.

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Patent No. 606586A: Malt Stirrer

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Today in 1898, US Patent 606586 A was issued, an invention of Jules Alphonse Saladin, for his “Malt Stirrer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

It is my purpose to provide improved mechanism for propelling the turning-over carriage in both directions, for raising and lowering the spiral shovels at the end of each movement of the carriage and before beginning the next movement, and for initiating and terminating those operations of the mechanism which are automatic.

It is my purpose also to improve the construction, arrangement, and operation of the gearing and of those parts which mesh and unmesh the same at different points in the operation of the turning-over mechanism.

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Patent No. 2245650A: Grain Separating Machine

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Today in 1941, US Patent 2245650 A was issued, an invention of Ovie N. Christopherson, for his “Grain Separating Machine.” There’s no Abstract, but it’s described generally as and “invention provid[ing] an improved highly efficient machine for the separation of various grains or seeds according to their thickness or transverse diameter,” making two claims:

1. In a separating machine, a separating screen, means for simultaneously imparting to said screen endwise reciprocating and transverse movements, said screen having elongated slots extended in the direction of its longitudinal reciprocating movement, the transverse movement thereof :being crosswise of the direction of said slots.

2. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said screen is in the form of a rotary drum and the transverse movement thereof being in a constant direction.

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Patent No. 3450600A: Malting Apparatus In Series

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Today in 1969, US Patent 3450600 A was issued, an invention of James Richard Allan Pollack, Alan Aldred Pool, and Graham John Ellis, assigned to Arthur Guinness Sons & Co. Dublin, The Irish Mallsters Association, and Rimer Mfg. Co. Ltd., for their “Malting Apparatus In Series.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

[This invention is an] Apparatus for malting steeped cereal grain comprising two vessels one of which is a malting vessel and the other a storage vessel. The internal surface of the malting vessel converges downwardly toward the outlet. Sweeper means within the malting vessel is gyrationally mounted adjacent the outlet, grain engaging means provided on the sweeper, and the sweeper is adapted to sweep over substantially the whole area of the convergent surface for loosening the grain to be discharged. Means associated with the malting vessel for adjusting temperature, humidity, and rate of air flow therein to condition the cereal grain. First transfer means for conveying grain discharged from the malting vessel to the storage vessel. Second transfer means associated with the storage vessel for returning to the inlet means of the malting vessel grain discharged from the storage vessel.

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Patent No. 650377A: Malting-Drum

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Today in 1900, US Patent 650377 A was issued, an invention of John F. Dornfeld, for his “Malting-Drum.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

The primary object of the invention is to provide, in a malting-drum, an improved construction for positively stirring the steeped barley contained in the drum, whereby the contents of the drum are properly stirred and mixed at all times.

A further object is to provide an improved means for introducing water into the malt whenever necessary in an even and regular quantity and in such manner that the water is thoroughly mixed with the malt.

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Beer Birthday: Sabine Weyermann

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Today is the 57th birthday of Sabine Weyermann, co-owner of Weyermann Malting in Bamberg, Germany. If you’ve visited any of the Craft Brewers Conferences, you’ve no doubt seen the bright yellow and red of the specialty malting company, which is sold in the U.S. by the Brewers Supply Group. Sabine’s family began the Weyermann Malt company in 1879, although she can trace her family back at least as far as 1510. She’s an amazing person, and her malt has helped fuel many a small and large brewery. Join me in wishing Sabine a very happy birthday.

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Sabine giving a presentation at their offices in Bamberg when I visited there in 2007.

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Sabine and her husband Thomas Kraus-Weyermann at CBC in San Diego, 2012.

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You can see the Weyermann Malting Brewer’s Star that Weyermann’s starting making at the top of my home office/guest house, which we call “The Brewhouse.”