Patent No. 2998351A: Process For The Continuous Malting Of Grain

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Today in 1961, US Patent 2998351 A was issued, an invention of Noel Keir, Frederick Richard Graesser, Wilbert E. Stoddart and Douglas L. Thompson, assigned to Dominion Malting Ontario Ltd., for their “Process for the Continuous Malting of Grain.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The present invention avoids most of the disadvantages of the prior art and provides for simple continuous processing through which not only complication is avoided but the processing may be reduced to a period of three days or less in comparison with approximately ten days or more, and is subject to minute control which has been difficult in prior batch processes. In fact the present continuous process provides for continuous processing through stages or zones maintaining constant conditions, varied as to one another, according to requirements necessary in regard to the character of the grain, and through which the grain continuously passes in effect to provide the continuous yield of a substantially uniform malt. Moreover, other attendant advantages result as labour required per unit of production will be reduced, resulting in greater economy, the weight and strength of complete equipment will be reduced and initial costs of buildings thus lessened; whereas the process provides for an extremely wide range of control as to time and processing, moisture content and temperature gradient, so that the conditions of manufacture may be adapted to the quality and type of grain being processed as to provide for the production of malt of superior quality and of generally uniform character in which all factors of production have been closely controlled throughout.

The invention generally embodies the steps of continuously forming and moving a bed of grain in a predetermined path, subjecting said moving grain bed to intermittent periods of water spray and periods of rest and periods of humid aeration at temperatures between 50 and 100 F., and finally moving said bed through a drying zone at elevated temperatures. Preferably the processing includes in said steps a period of drenching the bed followed by dry aeration. The grain may be introduced to the processing steps in any suitable manner, such as by pumping it together with water to the point of preliminary processing, which may start with the dispersing of the grain in water, and allowing the sound grain to settle, while the lighter grain and low gravity extraneous material may be continuously removed from the surface of the water body in which it is dispersed and delivered to a suitable recovery unit.

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Patent No. 409956A: Malting And Germinating Apparatus

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Today in 1889, US Patent 409956 A was issued, an invention of Joseph P. Gent, for his “Malting And Germinating Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to apparatus for the continuous malt-ing or germinating of grain; and it consists in certain improvements in construction and combination of parts, hereinafter fully described.

What I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. An apparatus for malting or germinating grain, consisting of an outer casing, a series of perforated floors one above the other, provided with automatically dumping sections, said floors having each a central aperture, an air-supplying pipe extending through said apertures and provided with apertures to discharge air beneath each of said floors, a shaft for rotating said floors, also extending through said openings, and a water pipe extending Within said openings and provided with a discharge above each floor, substantially as described.

2. An apparatus for malting or germinating grain, consisting of perforated floors one above the other, having central apertures in each, a shaft for revolving said floors extending vertically through said apertures, and a water-supply pipe extending also vertically through said apertures and having a spraying-discharge above each floor, the said floors having pivoted automatically-dumping sections, the dumping-point of each floor being a short distance in advance of the dumping point of the floor above, substantially as described.

3. An apparatus for malting or germinating grain, consisting of an inclosing-casing, revolving perforated floors one above the other, an air-pipe extending centrally through said floors and having a discharge-opening beneath each floor, an air-forcing and air moistening device communicating with said pipe, a water-supply pipe extending within said air-pipe and provided with a spraying discharge above each floor, and stirring and leveling devices above each floor, the said floors being provided with pivoted automatically dumping sections, the dumping-point of each floor being slightly in advance of the floor above, substantially as described.

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Patent No. 218231A: Improvement In Processes And Apparatus For Treating Hops And Malt Extracts

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Today in 1879, US Patent 218231 A was issued, an invention of Henry Clausen, for his “Improvement in Processes and Apparatus For Treating Hops and Malt Extracts.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to a new method of treating malt extract and hops in the manufacture of beer, and to a new apparatus for carrying the same into effect; and consists, first, in treating the malt extract and the hops in a vacuum-pan which has separate channels for admitting the malt and the hops; also, in the new construction and arrangement of vacuum-pan hereinafter described.

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Beer In Ads #1629: The Goodness Of Malt & A Match


Sunday’s ad is another one for the Barley and Malt Institute, also from 1959. This is the sixth ad I have from the now defunct trade group for barley growers. In this one a man sitting a bar, with the evening newspaper and bowl of pretzels in front of him, lights a match to fire up his cigarette as he glances to his left, watching the glass of beer he ordered as it’s just about finished being filled. It looks like the perfect way to end a workday, circa 1959.

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Beer In Ads #1628: The Goodness Of Malt While Boating


Saturday’s ad is for the Barley and Malt Institute, from 1959. This is the fifth ad I have from the now defunct trade group for barley growers. In this one a woman is pouring a beer on the dock for a man sitting in boat of uncertain size, though it’s probably relatively small, and trying to grab the glass (glass?!?) mug even before she’s finished filling it. The tagline is similar to other Malt Institute ads, suggesting it was a series of ads: “Fun-Flavors your favorite beer—healthfully.” I’m not even sure that quite makes sense.

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Patent No. 3896001A: Malting Processes

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Today in 1973, US Patent 3896001 A was issued, an invention of James Barrett, Brian Heys Kirsop, and Godfrey Henry Oliver Palmer, assigned to Brewing Patents Ltd., for their “Malting Processes.” Here’s the Abstract:

A process for the production of malt comprises removing a part of the husk of the barley, steeping the barley, treating the barley with aqueous mineral acid and with gibberellic acid, and allowing the barley to germinate. The combination of treatment steps is claimed to improve the rate of germination.

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Patent No. 4277505A: Process For The Malting Of Grain

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Today in 1981, US Patent 4277505 A was issued, an invention of Simon B. Simpson, for his “Process for the Malting of Grain.” Here’s the Abstract:

Germination of cereal grain in malting is carried out by passing steeped grain to and through a series of six closed spaced discrete vessels in succession. The grain is maintained in each vessel for about a day and in each vessel is subjected to an upward flow of humidified at temperated air. The grain is turned either in a vessel or through transference to the next vessel. Transference from one vessel to the other is carried out by discharging the grain from each vessel along a lower conveyor to an elevator which raises the grain to an upper conveyor that discharges the grain down into the next vessel. Grain leaves the last vessel of the series as green malt and then passes to a malt kiln where it is dried to a desired moisture level.

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Patent No. 3589270A: Device For Preparing Brewing Malt

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3589270 A was issued, an invention of Gisbert Schlimme and Manfred Tschirner, for their “Device For Preparing Brewing Malt.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

A single apparatus for preparing brewing malt in three steps, namely steeping, germinating and drying. A horizontal rotary annular perforated rack arranged in a cylindrical trough is charged with the material to be treated and while placed on the rotating rack is firstly steeped in water introduced into the trough below the rack. After the water has been discharged, the germinating step is performed by introducing air conveyed by a fan into the space between the rack and the bottom of the trough and upwardly through the material, which latter is turned by a horizontal series of vertically arranged turning worms which as a unit may be horizontally moved into the material on the rotating rack, the’ unit of worms being vertically movable into the layer of material and again outwardly therefrom.

During the final drying step, the same fan is used to circulate heated air through the material on the rotating rack, and the dried material then discharged from the rack by a conveyor which may be lowered into the material on the rack. The material is then discharged into a worm conveyor leading to a discharge pipe. As conveyor may serve an endless conveyor with buckets which scoop the material from the rack.

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Patent No. 606586A: Malt Stirrer

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Today in 1898, US Patent 606586 A was issued, an invention of Jules Alphonse Saladin, for his “Malt Stirrer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

It is my purpose to provide improved mechanism for propelling the turning-over carriage in both directions, for raising and lowering the spiral shovels at the end of each movement of the carriage and before beginning the next movement, and for initiating and terminating those operations of the mechanism which are automatic.

It is my purpose also to improve the construction, arrangement, and operation of the gearing and of those parts which mesh and unmesh the same at different points in the operation of the turning-over mechanism.

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Patent No. 2245650A: Grain Separating Machine

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Today in 1941, US Patent 2245650 A was issued, an invention of Ovie N. Christopherson, for his “Grain Separating Machine.” There’s no Abstract, but it’s described generally as and “invention provid[ing] an improved highly efficient machine for the separation of various grains or seeds according to their thickness or transverse diameter,” making two claims:

1. In a separating machine, a separating screen, means for simultaneously imparting to said screen endwise reciprocating and transverse movements, said screen having elongated slots extended in the direction of its longitudinal reciprocating movement, the transverse movement thereof :being crosswise of the direction of said slots.

2. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said screen is in the form of a rotary drum and the transverse movement thereof being in a constant direction.

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