Beer In Ads #2253: Reputation


Friday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1905. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, which seems like the least effective of this series, they’re simply saying because they’ve been around fifty years and spend a lot every year on their beer being pure that the “result is world-wide demand.” Hmm.

Schlitz-1905-reputation

Beer In Ads #2252: The After-Effects


Thursday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1906. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz is once again talking about how over half the cost of their brewing process is devoted to insuring their beer is pure, to avoid the after-effects of biliousness.

Schlitz-1906-after-effects

Beer In Ads #2251: Taste


Wednesday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1905. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz states that their beer “is unequaled — even in the old world brews.” That’s followed up by this curious statement. “Then we double the necessary cost of our brewing to attain absolute purity.” That seems like a bad business decision. That must be what the bean counters decided needed to be overcompensated, when they told the brewers to start cutting corners, the decision that sank the company.

Schlitz-1905-taste

Beer In Ads #2250: Value


Tuesday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1905. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz is trying to persuade their customers that buying their beer at the same price as other beers that is like getting Schlitz for half-price. Because “the cost of purity exceeds the cost of brewing.” In other words, it’s still nice at twice the price. Now that’s value.

Schlitz-1905-value

Beer In Ads #2249: The Yeast


Monday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1906. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz claims their yeast is “a secret” and that it’s responsible, at least in part, for its “peculiar goodness.” I’m not sure I’d want to describe my beer as “peculiar,” not matter good its peculiarity.

Schlitz-1906-yeast

Beer In Ads #2248: Aging


Sunday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1905. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz is saying fuck freshness, what you really want is old beer. No, not really, but it’s still an odd message that you don’t want beer that’s “too green,” or as the ad copy claims. “Beer doesn’t cause biliousness if it is aged well. It’s the green beer that should be avoided.” And thanks to Schlitz aging their beer “for months before it’s marketed,” “[t]he result is beer that is good for you.”

Schlitz-1905-aging

Beer In Ads #2247: Do You Ever See A Nervous Beer Drinker?


Saturday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1905. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz is once more beating the beer is healthy drum, but this one is priceless. “The malt in beer is a food to them; the hops a tonic. The slight percentage of alcohol is an aid to digestion, and that means more food.” Not to mention: “The habit of beer drinking gives the body the needed fluids.” Hydrate, people, hydrate! So there you have it. “That is why beer is prescribed for nervousness. That is why beer-drinking nations scarcely know what nervousness is.”

Schlitz-1905-nervous

Beer In Ads #2246: Ask Your Doctor


Friday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1906. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, Schlitz is suggesting that you ask your doctor about which beer to choose. I know my doctor prefers dark beer, he doesn’t like overly hoppy beers. But I still have a hard time believing the conversation would go anything like the ad suggests. But who knows, just a few years later, when prohibition began, doctors were writing prescriptions for medicinal beer.

Schlitz-1906-doctor

Beer In Ads #2245: Here’s Health To You


Thursday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1906. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, with the headline, “Here’s Health To You,” which according to the brewery “Means something when the beer is Schlitz.” According to the ad copy, over “half the cost of our brewing is spent to insure that Schlitz beer shall be pure.” I wonder how they calculated that?

Schlitz-1906-health

Beer In Ads #2244: It Is Not Good Advice To Say “Don’t Drink Beer”


Wednesday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1908. In the first decade of the 20th century, Schlitz Brewing, then one of the largest breweries in the U.S. after the industry had shrunk from over 4,000 to around 1,500 in just 25 or so years, did a series of primarily text ads, with various themes. In this ad, they explain why “It is not good advice to say ‘Don’t drink beer.'” It’s because “There are many who need it.” Then they add. “Your doctor advises beer. The healthiest peoples of the world drink the most of it.”

schlitz-1908-barley-and-hops-green