Beer In Ads #1816: Charles Carroll Of Carrollton — “Father Of Religious Liberty In America”


Tuesday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 9 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The ninth one features Charles Carroll III, a.k.a. Charles Carroll of Carrollton, who was the only catholic to sign the Declaration of Independence, and was last remaining signator in 1832, when he finally died at age 95. His catholicism, apparently, made him a champion of religious liberty, and his hospitality “was nothing short of royal,” being “a lifetime user of light wines and barley brews.”

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Beer In Ads #1815: The Pinckneys — “Fathers Of The Republic”


Monday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 8 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The eighth one features The Pinckneys — Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Charles Pinckney. They were both from South Carolina, and first cousins, once removed. Charles Cotesworth, known as “C.C.,” was the older of the two, and was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He also ran for president twice, as the Federalist Party candidate, but lost both times. The other Charles also signed the Constitution, and served as Governor of South Carolina, too. If you think political dynasties are recent phenomenon in America, seven people he’s related to have been governor, as well, in the 218 years since he left office. But was a Democrat, unlike his cousin the Federalist. Happily, they shared a belief in “the moderate use of light wines and barley brews.”

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Beer In Ads #1814: Thomas Jefferson — “Father Of The Declaration Of Independence”


Sunday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 7 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The seventh one features Thomas Jefferson, and tells the story of Jefferson and writing the Declaration of Independence along with some platitudes on his love of liberty, and beer, of course. It also includes what he wrote in a letter to James Madison. “A Captain Miller is about to settle in this country and establish a brewery. I wish to see this beverage become common.”

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Beer In Ads #1813: John Hancock — “Father Of The Revolution”


Saturday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 6 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The sixth one features John Hancock, and tells the story of Hancock and his contributions to American Independence, and even his indirect help with the constitution, including how certain they are that “he would have voted NO to prohibition enactments.”

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Beer In Ads #1812: Benjamin Franklin — “Father Of American Diplomacy”


Friday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 5 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The fifth one features Benjamin Franklin, and tells the story of Franklin in fairly gushing terms but, to their credit, at least they don’t mention that “quote.” And I love that they characterize his alcohol consumption as a “moderate user.”

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Beer In Ads #1811: Gouveneur Morris — “Father of the Penny”


Thursday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 4 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The fourth one features Gouveneur Morris (though it’s usually spelled Gouverneur Morris), and tells the story of Morris being a part of creating the Constitution, referring to him as both the “father of the American decimal system” and the “originator of the copper cent.” In reality, he was “widely credited as the author of the document’s preamble, and has been called the ‘Penman of the Constitution.'” But I guess that doesn’t sound quite as good as the “Father of the Penny.” Although there’s also this to add to his legacy. “He loved society, and his hospitality was famous. All his life he drank the creative brews of malt and hops.”

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Beer In Ads #1810: Alexander Hamilton — “Father Of American Credit”


Wednesday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 3 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The third one features Alexander Hamilton, and tells the story of Hamilton creating the Constitution, and his contributions to creating credit. And apparently he was also a fan of beer. “During Hamilton’s lifetime he used his great influence to encourage and protect the brewing industry. Among all the Fathers of the Republic none knew better than he that honestly-brewed barley-malt beers make for true temperance.”

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Beer In Ads #1809: James Madison — “Father of the Constitution”


Tuesday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 2 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The second one features James Madison, and tells the story of Madison creating the Constitution, and being a moderate beer drinker. “Many a foaming glass of good barley-malt beer he drank with his bosom friend Thomas Jefferson.”

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Beer In Ads #1808: George Washington — “Father Of His Country”


Monday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1915, No. 1 in a series they did in 1914-15 called “Framers of the Constitution of the U.S.A.” The first one features George Washington, and tells the story of Washington presiding over the Constitutional Convention and draws some clumsy parallels between him and Anheuser-Busch. I especially love this one. “Like all of the great men of his time, he was a moderate user of good old barley brews.”

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Beer In Ads #1775: A Tradition In Hospitality


Wednesday’s holiday ad is for Budweiser, from 1962. The slogan “A Tradition in Hospitality” was used by Anheuser-Busch in holiday ads over a number of years, from at least the 1940s. It’s quite a spread they’ve put out; large turkey, grapes and a Jell-O mold in the background. Who the hell is serving Jello-O with dinner?

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