Patent No. 2447122A: Hop Picking Machine

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Today in 1948, US Patent 2447122 A was issued, an invention of Emil C. Horst Jr., for his “Hop Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

There are two types of hop picking machines in general use at the present time, to wit, a stationary and a portable type. Where stationary machines are used, the hop vines are cut ofi in the fields and loaded on trucks or wagons and hauled into the stationary machine where they are removed and attached to grasper bars which pull the hop vines between revolving drums or traveling belts equipped with V-shaped wire fingers which comb the vines and strip or remove the hops and most of the leaves. The picked hops and leaves are then delivered to separator belts where the leaves and stems and other foreign material are separated from the hops, and clean hop-s are finally obtained.

The portable type of machine operates in substantially the same manner, the principal difference being that the portable machine travels in the fields where the hops grow, and as the machine advances, the hop vines are cut down and attached directly to grasper bars which pull the vines through the machine with the result that the hops and leaves are stripped on and then delivered to separators to finally obtain the clean hops.

From the foregoing, it will be noted that whether a portable or stationary machine is employed, the hop vines must be cut off and attached to grasper bars in order to feed or pull them through the machines where the stripping operation takes place.

The object of the present invention is to provide a new method and machine whereby hops can be picked directly from the vines in the field without the necessity of cutting the vines free from the plant or root from which they grow; to provide a portable machine which straddles and travels along a row of hop vines and as it travels, combs the hop vines in an upward direction thereby more efficiently removing the which can singly and in clusters generally beneath the leaves and arms of the hop Vines; and further, to provide a machine in which grasper bars together with associated mechanism is entirely eliminated and the machine proper very materially simplified, this being accomplished by providing a roller which rolls over the stalk the vine and with sufficient traction to pull the vine downwardly through the combing or picking fingers of the machine as the machine advances.

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Patent No. 2685966A: Apparatus For Separating Picked Hops From Leaves And Stems

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Today in 1954, US Patent 2685966 A was issued, an invention of Florian F. Dauenhauer of Santa Rosa, California, for his “Apparatus for Separating Picked Hops From Leaves and Stems.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

An object of this invention, is, to provide. a conveyor, which is inclined laterally, or sidewise. The hops, leaves and stems to be separated are discharged upon the conveyor near the higher section thereof. The clean hops will roll to the lower section of the conveyor, while unclean hops, leaves and stems, will be moved along the higher section of the conveyor. The clean, hops are conveyed to a sacking device, While the unclean hops are moved from one conveyor to another until all of the leaves and other refuse are separated from the hops.

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Patent No. 2757785A: Vertical Hop Picker Having Endless Carrier Chain For Hop Vines, Moving In A Vertical Plane

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Today in 1956, US Patent 2757785 A was issued, an invention of Florian F. Dauenhauer, for his “Vertical Hop Picker Having Endless Carrier Chain for Hop Vines, Moving in a Vertical Plane.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

An object of my invention is to provide a vertical hop picker having endless carrier chain for hop vines, moving in a vertical plane, which is an improvement over the vertical hop picking machine shown in my copending application, Serial No. 179,722, filed August 16, 1950, and now Patent No. 2,677,378. In the copending case, I show an endless hop-carrying chain conveyor that has a portion for conveying hop vines between pairs of vertically movable hop picking fingers. The return portion of the endless hop-carrying chain that extends along the hop picking fingers, lies in the same horizontal plane as the portion that carries the vines between the picking lingers, but the return portion is spaced laterally therefrom. Moreover, I also disclose in the copending case, the endless hop-carrying chain as having an inclined portion extending from a hop vine feeding ‘platform up to the hop picking finger part of the machine. Here again, the return chain part passing along the inclined portion is spaced laterally from the inclined hop vine carrying portion. This necessitated the use of cam rails at the feed and discharge ends of the machine for opening the jaws of vine grippers, carried by the chain, for permitting an operator to attach vines to the grippers at the feed end and for automatically releasing the vines at the discharge end of the machine.

In the present case, the endless hop-carrying chain conveyor has both of its reaches lying in the same vertical plane. This causes the jaws of the vine grippers to open automatically at the discharge end of the machine and release the vines that have had their hops removed. The jaws remain in open position as the vine grippers travel from the discharge endV of the machine to the feed end. No cam rails are necessary at the feed and discharge ends of the machine.

A further object of my invention is to provide a device of the type described in which a swingable elevator boom is placed at the feed end of the machine for supporting the feed end of the carrier chain for hop vines. The boom can be swung so that its free end can be positioned adjacent to a hop vine carrying truck and this will permit an operator to unload hop vines one at a time, directly from the truck and attach `them to the vine grippers at the feed end of the machine. After the truck has been emptied, the boom can be swung to another truck and the vine unloading and attaching process continued. The unloading platform at the feed end of the machine may be dispensed with if desired.

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Patent No. 544156A: Hop Picker And Cleaner

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Today in 1895, US Patent 544156 A was issued, an invention of Warren H. Clark, for his “Hop Picker and Cleaner.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention has relation to machines for picking and cleaning hops, the object being to provide a machine into which the hops and vines can be fed as they come from the field, and which will not only thoroughly pick the hops from the vines and stems, but Will also effect the complete separation therefrom of the vines, leaves, and stems, the Work being performed in a rapid and reliable manner.

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Patent No. 218231A: Improvement In Processes And Apparatus For Treating Hops And Malt Extracts

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Today in 1879, US Patent 218231 A was issued, an invention of Henry Clausen, for his “Improvement in Processes and Apparatus For Treating Hops and Malt Extracts.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to a new method of treating malt extract and hops in the manufacture of beer, and to a new apparatus for carrying the same into effect; and consists, first, in treating the malt extract and the hops in a vacuum-pan which has separate channels for admitting the malt and the hops; also, in the new construction and arrangement of vacuum-pan hereinafter described.

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Patent No. 2898209A: Method Of Extracting Hops

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Today in 1959, US Patent 2898209 A was issued, an invention of James E. Grant, Charles J. Krueck, Milton E. Lavrich, Justin J. Murtaugh, and Donald G. Ruff, assigned to the Blatz Brewing Company, for their “Method of Extracting Hops.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Our invention relates to a new and improved hop extract; to a new and improved method of making a hop extract; and to a new and improved hopped beverage, such as alcoholic malt beverages exemplified by beer and ale.

While the invention applies to the treatment of any part of the hop plant, it refers particularly to the treatment of the cones of the hop plant. These cones are preferably extracted in the whole state, but they may be cut, ground, or otherwise comminuted.

After a lengthy discussion, in the last page of the application, they set forth their claims, summarized:

1. A method of extracting solid starting material, said stafting material having substantially the composition of vine-fresh hops, which consists in extracting said material with methanol at a maximum temperature of 65 C. to produce an original liquid extract of said starting ina– terial, said original liquid extract including water which is extracted from said starting material, said water being mixed with said methanol in said original liquid extract, said original liquid extract including water-insoluble and methanol-soluble material which is extracted from said solid starting material and which is dissolved in the methanol of said original liquid extract, said original liquid extract including water-soluble and methanol-insoluble material which is extracted from said solid starting material and which is dissolved in the water of said original liquid extract, said methanol-soluble and waterinsoluble extracted material including alpha-resin and beta-resin, the weight of said alpha resin being at least 40% of the weight of the total soft resin; separating said original liquid extract from the undissolved, residual part of said starting material; flowing the separated, original liquid extract forwardly through an externally heated zone in the form of a thin, rapidly forwardly-flowing stream to heat said forwardly-flowing stream substantially uniformly within’ said heating Zone without substantially evaporating methanol or water from said forwardly-flowing stream within said heating zone, forwardly flowing said forwardlyflowing stream within said heating zone at a sufliciently high velocity to substantially prevent the solutes of said forwardly-flowing stream from coating the inner face of said heating zone; flowing said forwardly-flowing stream out of the outlet of said heating zone into an evaporation chamber; evaporating a part of the methanol and water in said evaporation chamber from the stream which is flowed into said evaporation chamber and thus providing a residue of said stream within said evaporation chamber, flowing the evaporated methanol and water out of said evaporation chamber; flowing the residue of said stream out of said evaporation chamber forwardly through said heating zone and back into said evaporation chamber in cyclic succession while evaporating a part of the methanol and water from the stream which is flowed into said evaporation chamber during each cycle and flowing the part of the methanol and water which is thus evaporated durmg each cycle out of said evaporating chamber, maintaining said evaporation chamber at a maximum temperature of substantially 65 C. and at a maximum pressure of substantially millimeters of mercury, and continuing said cyclic succession to produce a concentrate of said original extract in which the weight of said alpha-resin is at least 40% of the weight of the total soft resin.

2. A method according to claim 1 in which substantially all the methanol is evaporated in said cyclic succe’ssi’on within said evaporation chamber from said original extract.

3. A method according to claim 1, in which the cyclic succession is stopped when said concentrate includes an aqueous phase of residual water and a non aqueous methanol resin phase in which said resins are dissolved, and said aqueous phase is separated from said methanol resin phase. I

4. A method according to claim 3, in which said aqueous phase is separated from said methanol resin phase by dissolving a water-soluble salting-out agent in said aqueous phase.

5. A method according to claim 3, in which the weight of said aqueous phase is at least substantially 70% of the weight of said concentrate.

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Patent No. PP20200P3: Hop Plant Named ‘Apollo’

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Today in 2009, US Patent PP20200 P3 was issued, an invention of Roger D. Jeske and Joe Brulotte, assigned to S.S. Steiner, Inc., for their “Hop plant named ‘Apollo.'” Here’s the Abstract:

A new and distinct variety of hop, Humulus lupulus L., named “APOLLO” is characterized by its exceptional high percentage of alpha acids, excellent storage stability of alpha acids, low CoH value for an alpha variety, and resistance to hop powdery mildew strains found in Washington. The new variety was cultivated as a result of a cross in 2000 at Golden Gate Roza Hop Ranches in Prosser, Wash., United States and has been asexually reproduced in Prosser, Wash., United States.

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Patent No. 2647521A: Hop Picking Machine

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Today in 1953, US Patent 2647521 A was issued, an invention of George E. Miller, for his “Hop Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to mechanism for use in removing hops from hop vines. Numerous machines have been developed from time to time, many of them patented by me, for the purpose of removing hops from vines mechanically. One of the difficulties is that hops are quite delicate and must be handled with great care and another factor is that substantially all of the hops ‘must be removed from the vine for economic can be brought for picking, and also adaptable for use in a portable machine movable through a field of growing hops to remove the hops from the vine.

Another object of my invention is to provide a hop picking machine effective to remove substantially all of the growing hops from the vines, but capable of operating with sufficient delicacy so that the hops are not injured by the mechanical picking and handling.

Another object of my invention is to provide means for removing the hops from the vines without removing a large quantity of leaves and stems; that is, a device for selectively removing the hops while leaving, as far as possible, the leaves and stems undisturbed.

A further object of the invention is to provide I a hop picking machine having flexibly mounted hop picker elements effective to rove throughout 7 portions of the hop vine being picked, so that the hops are engaged from various different directions and in various different attitudes to promote their removal in the most expeditious fashion.

A still further object or the invention is to provide a hop picking machine in which the action of the picker elements is so gentle as not to injure or cut or tear the hops themselves.

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Patent No. 3594995A: Hop-Picking Machine

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3594995 A was issued, an invention of Thomas Lee Evans and Charlie J. Soules, for their “Hop-Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to hop-picking machines and, more particularly, to novel, improved machines for field picking hops from vines hanging from overhead wires or trellises or other supports.

We have now developed a novel, improved machine for filed picking hops which does not have the drawbacks of machines heretofore proposed for this purpose and accordingly represents a significant advance in the art over the latter. The novel hop-picking machines of the present invention are preferably self-propelled and, generally speaking, include graspers for engaging the lower ends of the vines and maintaining them in picking position as they move through the machine, picking cuts for stripping the hops from the vines, a conveyor arrangement for carrying the hops away, a cutter for severing the vines to free them from the supports, and an arrangement for expelling picked vines from the machine.

One of the important advantages of the novel hoppicking machine described herein is that, being self-propelled, it can be maneuvered through a field more easily and much faster than the cumbersome pushed-type” picker described in the Horst patents identified above and is accordingly capable of picking hops at a much higher rate. Another advantage, also resulting in increased capacity, is that the machines of the present invention are capable of picking two rows of vines simultaneously in contrast to the patented Horst machines which are single-row pickers.

In the Horst machines, the vines are pulled down through the machine as they are picked. Accordingly, a field hand must accompany the machine and cut the vines free from the trellises as they move into the machine. Applicant’s novel machine in contrast does not depend on downward movement of the vines they are picked; and, moreover, it is provided with its own cutter for severing the vines to free them from the trellises. Accordingly, the necessity of employing hand labor for this purpose is eliminated by the present invention together with the attendant expense.

In conjunction with the foregoing, another novel and important feature ofthe present invention is that the picking cats are vertically adjustable. This makes it possible to quickly adjust the cats as the heights of the overhead supports change so that the vines can be picked clean up to the supports.

Another important feature of the present invention is a novel conveyor for the hops stripped from the vines which normally discharges into a truck or the like but can be employed to store picked hops so that the machine can continue to pick while a loaded truck is being replaced or the machine is turning at the end ofa row, etc. In similar circumstances the picking operation would have be stopped in heretofore proposed machines such as those .described in .the Horst patents, for example.

Yet another important feature of the present invention is a novel grasper line for holding the vines in the proper position for picking in which the grapsers are moved at a speed matching the ground speed of the picking machine. Further, the grapscr line is configured to compensate for sagging vinesupporting wires, thereby ensuring that the vines are grasped at the proper location.

Other important features of the invention are a novel cutter mechanism for severing the vines and freeing them from the trellises and a novel mechanism for expelling the picked vines from the machine. Yet another novel and important feature of the invention is that the operating mechanisms are powered entirely by hydraulic motors, substantially eliminating belt and chain and similar drives. This makes the novel machines disclosed herein significantly simpler than comparable prior art harvesters.

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Patent No. 3332748A: Extraction Of Hop Bitters From Beer With Iso-Octane Using Synchronized Pulses In A Helical Coil

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Today in 1967, US Patent 3332748 A was issued, an invention of Jack Albert Spicer and Max William Betts, for their “Extraction of Hop Bitters from Beer With Iso-Octane Using Synchronized Pulses in a Helical Coil.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to the extraction of chemical substances from liquid mixtures and in particular to the extraction of such substances from complex mixtures for purposes of analysis.

In the analysis of a complex mixture, it may be desired to separate one or more constituents of the mixture, by liquid/liquid extraction methods, in order to obtain a relatively simple solution, for example for spectrographic analysis. Thus, for example, it has been proposed to extract hop bitter substances from brewers wort or beer by liquid/liquid extraction with iso-octane, whereupon the solution of the hop bitter substances may be analyzed by ultra-violet spectrographic analysis. The present invention provides an extraction process suitable for use in the separation of desired compounds from such mixtures.

According to the invention, a process for the extraction of a chemical substance from a liquid mixture comprises feeding the liquid mixture and a solvent for the desired chemical substance in synchronized pulses through a horizontally disposed coiled tube, and separating the residual liquid mixture from the solution of the desired chemical substance in the solvent. Preferably the coiled tube is helically coiled.

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