Patent No. PP8823P: Hop Plant Named “H87207-2″

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Today in 1994, US Patent PP8823 P was issued, an invention of Gene Probasco, assigned to John I. Haas, Inc., for his “Hop Plant Named ‘H87207-2.'” Here’s the Abstract:

A new variety of hop plant (H87207-2) originating as the result of a controlled cross pollination between unpatented Galena female hop plant with unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. (Haas) male hop plant No. 833-53M, and unique particularly for its cones’ unusually high percentage of beta acids when compared to its female parent variety Galena (unpatented) and otherwise as herein described.

It’s been 21 years since this hop variety was patented. Did it ever get its own name? Does anybody know?
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Patent No. 1232098A: Process Of Leaching Out Hops

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Today in 1917, US Patent 1232098 A was issued, an invention of Heinrich Schneider, for his “Process Of Leaching Out Hops.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of the present invention is a process of leaching hops in a hop extracting apparatus provided with a strainer and stirring device, but passing the wort and after-wort through the hops on their way between the refining vat and the copper.

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Patent No. 2841500A: Method Of Packaging And Preserving Hops

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Today in 1958, US Patent 2841500 A was issued, an invention of James O. Hughes and Ray Nelson, assigned to Tri-State Processing Company, of Yakima, Wash., for their “Method Of Packaging And Preserving Hops.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Our invention relates to a method of packaging hops. An important object of the invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive method of storing hops which have been compressed in bales, for providing an airtight package. A further object of the invention is to provide an airtight casing or container for the hops, which will retain the hops within their original state, without the loss of aroma or color.

A method of packaging hops for shipment and preserving the same in the original condition during such shipment, comprising taking a compressed bale of hops and removing the original covering sheet and bands therefrom, subjecting the original compressed bale of hops to a higher degree of pressure to highly compress the bale and reduce the size of the bale to approximately one-half of the original size, retaining the highly compressed bale in substantially the same reduced size by enclosing the same in a sheet and bands and thereby resisting the expansion of the bale, then enclosing the highly compressed bale which is reduced in size Within a casing formed from a plastic sheet, then heat sealing.

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Patent No. 5772000A: Hop Vine Transfer System

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Today in 1998, US Patent 5772000 A was issued, an invention of Paul J. Serres, for his “Hop Vine Transfer System.” Here’s the Abstract:

A hop vine transfer system (10) includes a plurality of magazines (14a, 14b, 14c) each fed by an associated unloader mechanism (12). Once a magazine has been filled with hope vines (V), it is unloaded by a pivoting transfer conveyor (16) having an entrance end (50) alignable with the exit end portion (48) of the magazine. The opposite exit end (91) of the transfer conveyor is disposed in operable engagement with a picking machine conveyor (18) that moves the hop vines, with their stub ends upwardly, through a picking machine (22) to remove the hops from the vines.

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Patent No. 20120167263P1: Hot Plant Named ‘HBC 366′

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Today in 2012, US Patent 20120167263 P1 was issued, an invention of Jason Perrault and Eugene G. Probasco, assigned to the Hop Breeding Company, L.L.C., for their “Hot Plant Named ‘HBC 366.'” Here’s the Abstract:

A new hop plant named ‘HBC 366’ is disclosed. The cones of ‘HBC 366’ mature in late September, and yield a crop of 2200 to 2700 pounds per acre. ‘HBC 366’ is used for its unique aromatic quality, high alpha acid content and exceptional yield.

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Patent No. PP8812P: Hop Plant Named H87311-3

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Today in 1994, US Patent PP8812 P was issued, an invention of Gene Probasco, assigned to John I. Haas, Inc., for his “Hop Plant Named H87311-3.” Here’s the Abstract:

A new variety of hop plant (H87311-3) originating as the result of a controlled cross pollination between an unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. female hop plant No. 832-17 with an unpatented John I. Haas, Inc. male hop plant No. 833-53M, and unique particularly for its cones’ unusually high percentage of alpha acids when compared to its female grandparent variety Galena (unpatented) and otherwise as herein described.

Its grandparent was Galena hops, but it doesn’t appear to have been subsequently named and made available commercially. FreshHops mentions it only briefly with not much more information than the patent application.
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Patent No. 3390000A: Separation Of Lupulin From Hops

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Today in 1968, US Patent 3390000 A was issued, an invention of Robert J. Brison and John H. Litchfield, assigned to John I. Haas Inc., for their “Separation Of Lupulin From Hops.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

In the production of beer or ale one important ingredient employed is hops. Hops contain certain soft resins which impart not only bitterness to the beer, but also aroma. In the usual practice the hop cones which include the leaves, stems, petals, lupulin and at times, seeds, are boiled in their entirety within a sugary wort in order to extract the necessary resins and aromatic oils from the lupulin thereof. The lupulin particles are closed cup-like fibrous containers filled with hop flavoring substance including a relatively small amount of moisture, and essentially soft bitter resins and volatile aromatic oils.

It has been known however, that the flavor content of lupulin deteriorates in the ordinary practice of drying the hops prior to shipment to the brewery and that oxidation of lupulin occurs easily if the dried hops are not placed in sealed containers (preferably in an inert atmosphere) thus avoiding further oxidation thereof.

It will be recognized that such a procedure is costly since it involves packaging and handling extraneous -materials. Efforts dating back to the mid-nineteenth century have been directed to separating the lupulin from the hops although certain economic disadvantages have prevented their widespread acceptance. Further, many of these efforts result in a lupulin product excessively fragmented or crushed, thus exposing its valuable constituents to unnecessarily rapid and disadvantageous oxidation.

It is therefore an important object of the instant invention to overcome the disadvantages of prior art methods of separating lupulin from hops.

It is a further object of the instant invention to provide an improved method of separating lupulin particles from hops in the substantial absence of damage or comminution of said lupulin particles.

Another object of the instant invention is to provide an improved, simplified and economical method of separating lupulin particles from hops in the absence of appreciable particle size reduction and in the absence of appreciable oxidation or deterioration of the soft resin or volatile aromatic oil content `of said lupulin particles.

Still another object of the instant invention is to provide a simple, effective method of separating lupulin from hops which method can be implemented at the ranch or vine location and wherein the hops treated can be fresh (not dried, dehydrated or stored for any substantial length of time) or dried or a mixture thereof.

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Patent No. 3891781A: Process For The Extraction Of Hops

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Today in 1975, US Patent 3891781 A was issued, an invention of Kurt Bauer, Helmut Findeiss, and Alfred Krempel, for their “Protective Coating for Cans and Methods for Application of Coating Thereto.” Here’s the Abstract:

Process for extracting from hops the essential brewing ingredients thereof, viz., neutral substances, bitter substances and tannin, which process comprises subjecting a primary extract solution of hops, e.g., in alcohol or hydrocarbon solvents, said solution containing as ingredients the neutral substances, bitter substances and tannin, to a first liquid-liquid extraction, wherein either (i) the tannins or (ii) the neutral substances are separated off, leaving a solution of (i) neutral and bitter substances or (ii) tannins and bitter substances, and subjecting the latter solution to a second liquid-liquid extraction to separate said solution into its components; the first extractant is desirably an aliphatic, cycloaliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon when the primary extract solvent is an alcohol or aqueous-alcoholic solution, to result in extraction of the neutral and bitter substances in a hydrocarbon phase and leaving of the tannin in the alcoholic phase, whereafter the neutral and bitter substances are separated from each other by treating the extract with a second extractant, desirably aliphatic alcohol containing water.

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Patent No. 2891555A: Machine For Plucking Hops

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Today in 1959, US Patent 2891555 A was issued, an invention of Albert E. Brookes, for his “Machine For Plucking Hops or Like Plants.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to a machine intended primarily for plucking hop flowers from their bines, but also usable for analogous purposes such, for example, as the plucking of beans form their bines or the separation of seeds from herbs and the like, and has for its object to provide such a machine in a convenient and efficient form, and particularly to provide an improved means for gripping and traversing the bines relative to plucking means.

In a machine according to the invention a plurality of pairs of endless driving chains are arranged parallel with one another, each pair of chains having parallel runs between which the bine is adapted to be held transversely for movement relative to plucking means.

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Patent No. 2750945A: Hop-Picking Machine

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Today in 1956, US Patent 2750945 A was issued, an invention of Millard E. Crowley, for his “Hop-Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Having set forth the invention broadly, included among the objects thereof are the following: to provide a hop picking machine capable of the simultaneous raking of hops from vines and short arms; to provide apparatus capable of multi-directional combing of hop vines and arms; to combine in a single machine, functions heretofore deemed characteristic of separate machines, as well as, to produce additional functions without the necessity of employing all parts required by the separate machines; to combine in a single machine, capable of continuous operation over extended time intervals, the functions of hop vine and arm picking; and to provide a short arm picker per se capable of optimum picking action.

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