Patent No. PP10956P: Hop Variety Named “Columbus”

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Today in 1999, US Patent PP10956 P was issued, an invention of Gregory K. Lewis, Charles E. Zimmermann, and Henry Hazenberg, assigned to Hopunion USA, for their “Hop Variety Named ‘Columbus.'” Doesn’t it seem like Columbus has been around a lot longer than sixteen years? Maybe it was marketed under the name before it was patented, and in fact the application date was March 22, 1995, with a priority date of November 30, 1993, which as I understand it means the date that the applicant asserts was the “invention date,” which in this case is more likely when it was first sold or used by that trade name. Here’s the Abstract:

A new and distinct variety of hop, Humulus lupulus L., named Columbus, has a superior yield of cones and a superior content of alpha acids in its resin. The new variety was cultivated as a result of a cross at a nursery near Prosser, Wash., United States, and has been asexually reproduced in and about Yakima, Wash., United States.

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Patent No. 2681066A: Apparatus For Picking Hops From Hop Branches And Clusters And For Separating Leaves And Stems Therefrom

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Today in 1954, US Patent 2681066 A was issued, an invention of Florian F. Dauenhauer, for his “Apparatus For Picking Hops From Hop Branches And Clusters And For Separating Leaves And Stems Therefrom.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary of the invention’s objects:

An object of invention is to provide an apparatus for picking hops from hop branches and clusters and for separating leaves and stems therefrom is especially designed to receive hop clusters and broken off vine portions that are delivered from the hop picking machine shown in my copending application, Ser. No. 179,722, filed August 15, 1959. The present apparatus comprises two main parts, trommel for separating hops from the other vine portions, and a branch picker for removing hops from hop branches and hop clusters. The branch picker could be used for purposes other than picking hops from branches, such as by of example, the picking of string beans from vines.

A further object of my invention is to provide a device of the type described in which the trommel and hop branch picker cooperate with each other to pick hops from branches and hop clusters and to separate the hops from all other parts of the hop vines. The trommel removes freed hops and delivers all other portions of the vine and any hops carried thereby, to the hop branch picker. The hop branch picker severs the hops from any vine portions or hop clusters and delivers the freed hops back to the tromnmel for screening.

A further object of m invention is to provide a device of the type described which is efficient for the purpose intended and will effectively pick and separate hops from hop vine branches or clusters.

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Patent No. 2473395A: Hops Treatment

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Today in 1949, US Patent 2473395 A was issued, an invention of George Segal, for his “Hops Treatment.”

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Hops in Yakima, Washington.

There’s no Abstract, although after a lengthly exposition about hop production prior to 1944, he eventually describes the process he’s patented, which appears to be about temperature and keeping the hops cold:

  1. The method of treating hops which consists’ of freezing the hops while they still retain substantially their fresh aroma, the temperature being depressed through the temperature of about 30 F. at a rate not substantially greater than about 1 F. per hour, then holding the hops in frozen state for a storage period, then thawing the hops, and thereafter drying the hops.
  2. The method of treating hops which consists of freezing the hops while they still retain their fresh aroma, holding the hops in frozen state for a storage period, then thawing the hops, the temperature being raised through the temperature of about 30 F. at a rate not substantially greater than about 1 F. per hour, and thereafter drying the hops.
  3. The subject matter of claim 1, characterized of chilling hops, after picking, to a point somewhat above their freezing point and holding the hops chilled but unfrozen for less than about six weeks, then freezing the hops, the temperature theoretically or actually,
  4. At a rate not substantially greater [?] being depressed through the temperature of about 30 F. at a rate not substantially greater than about 1 F. per hour, then holding the hope I in frozen state for a storage period, then thawing the hops, and thereafter drying the hops.
  5. The subject matter of claim 4, characteri’zed by the fact that in thawing the hops, the temperature is raised through the temperature of about 30 F. at a rate not substantially greater.

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A mountain of hops from the kiln, about to be baled and put into cold storage.

Patent No. 8460720B2: Hops-Based Deodorant

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Today in 2013, US Patent 8460720 B2 was issued, an invention of Chantal Bergeron, Stefan Gafner, and Jennifer L. Lafrance, assigned to Tom’s Of Maine, Inc., for their “Hops-Based Deodorant.” Here’s the Abstract:

The present invention relates to deodorants and other body care products comprising a CO2 extract of the hops plant having bacteriocide/bacteriostat properties wherein the CO2 extract has a very low level of essential hops oils.

Apparently all of Tom’s deodorants use a hop extract, it’s listed among the ingredients and specifically is the Hops extract [CO2] and caprylic/capric triglyceride.
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Patent No. 2599080A: Hop Picking Mechanism

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Today in 1952, US Patent 2599080 A was issued, an invention of Edouard Thys, for his “Hop Picking Mechanism.” There’s no Abstract, though the description in the application states that it’s an “invention relat[ing] to hop picking mechanism and, more particularly, to improvements in hop picking fingers and bars.”

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a finger bar assembly wherein the picking fingers are formed and supported in a fashion to prevent breakage thereof during use.

It is another principal object of the present invention to provide a picking finger assembly comprising a plurality of resilient fingers, supported by a finger bar in a fashion that a resilient finger may be removed easily from the bar, if it becomes necessary, with a minimum delay in the operation of the machine with which the fingers are utilized and in a fashion that requires a minimum of skill.

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Patent No. 428101A: Apparatus For Extracting Hops

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Today in 1890, US Patent 428101 A was issued, an invention of John Irlbacker, for his “Apparatus For Extracting Hops.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

My present invention has general reference to improvements in hop-extractors; and it consists in the novel and peculiar combination of parts and details of construction, as hereinafter first fully set forth and described, and then pointed out in the claims.

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Patent No. 4154865A: Method For Processing Hops For Brewing

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Today in 1979, US Patent 4154865 A was issued, an invention of Herbert L. Grant, assigned to S. S. Steiner, Inc., for his “Method for Processing Hops for Brewing.” Here’s the Abstract:

There is provided a method of processing hops or hop extracts for brewing in which hops and particularly the alpha acids in the hops are stabilized against deterioration and light sensitivity, the process broadly comprising isomerizing a substantial portion of the alpha acids in the hops and contacting said iso-alpha acids witha metallic hydride compound, the metal thereof being suitable for use in foods, until the reaction is substantially completed. In another aspect, the alpha acids present in the hops are converted to their reduced isomerized products which are desirable for brewing. The process is especially suitable for use in pelletizing operations.

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Patent No. 2677378A: Method And Apparatus For Picking Hops

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Today in 1954, US Patent 2677378 A was issued, an invention of Florian F. Dauenhauer, for his “Method and Apparatus for Picking Hops.” There’s no Abstract, but in the description it states that his “present invention relates to improvements in a method and apparatus for picking hops.”

An object of this invention is to provide an improved method of picking hops from vines, assuring a thorough removal of the hops, with out damaging the hops. More specifically stated, the vines are formed into wave-like configurations, defining alternate crests and valleys extending lengthwise of the vines.

The waves thus formed are advanced lengthwise of the vines to continually replace crests by valleys and vice versa, thereby undulating the vines in first one direction and then the other for causing pendulum-like movements and exposure of the hops by the continual weaving of the vines. The hops are removed during the undulating of the vines.

Moreover, the method employs the progressive increasing of the amplitudes of the waves as the hops are picked. Also, crests and valleys of the waves are interchanged abruptly as the picking of the hops continue, and the branches of the vines are spread out laterally to expose hops and preclude the vines from matting.

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Patent No. 2630311A: Apparatus For Drying Hops

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Today in 1953, US Patent 2630311 A was issued, an invention of Verlin A. Bloxham, for his “Apparatus For Drying Hops.” There’s no Abstract, but in the description it states that the “invention relates to an apparatus for drying hops. The apparatus commonly employed heretofore for drying hops includes a house-like structure having a reticulated floor upon which the hops are loaded. This floor may be some 20 feet above the ground. Beneath the floor is disposed a heater burning fuel of one sort or another. The products of combustion from the heater usually pass through a zig-Zag or similar arrangement of pipes. located perhaps 8 feet beneath the floor on the way to the chimney. Forced draft of air is not provided, but the house is built tall enough, compared to its section, to provide a stack effect.”
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Patent No. 3316916A: Hop Picking Machine

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Today in 1967, US Patent 3316916 A was issued, an invention of Florian F. Dauenhauer and Thomas H. Frazer, for their “Hop Picking Machine.” There’s no Abstract, and all they say in the description is a generic the “present invention relates to improvements in a hop picking machine, and it consists in the combination, construction and arrangement of parts as hereinafter described and claimed.” Which isn’t much for such a complicated machine, but you can get a better sense of it reading through the lengthy full description.
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