Beer In Film #73: How It’s Made — Pewter Tankards

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Today’s beer video is from the documentary series How It’s Made that runs on the Discovery Channel in Canada and Great Britain, and on the Science Channel in the U.S. How It’s Made has been running for 22 seasons, having debuted in 2001. Each half-hour show features around four roughly five-minute segments, so they’ve covered a lot over the course of 286 episodes so far. This show, about Pewter Tankards, was the fourth segment in episode 226, the 5th episode in Season 18.

Beer In Film #70: How It’s Made — Glass Bottles

brookston-film
Today’s beer video is from the documentary series How It’s Made that runs on the Discovery Channel in Canada and Great Britain, and on the Science Channel in the U.S. How It’s Made has been running for 21 seasons, having debuted in 2001. Each half-hour show features around four roughly five-minute segments, so they’ve covered a lot over the course of 286 episodes so far. This show, about Glass Bottles, was the first segment in episode 93, the 2nd episode in Season 8.

Three Reasons To Drink Beer From A Glass

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Today’s infographic provides “3 Reasons to Drink Beer From A Glass,” and while I could probably come up with a few more, it’s a good solid list, which is why I’m always the asshole wherever I go who insists on a glass, even if everybody else is drinking straight from the bottle or can.

Drinking-Beer-From-A-Glass
Click here to see the poster full size.

Glassware By Beer Style

pint-glass-empty
Today’s infographic is a poster of the most common glassware for beer, with a list of styles below each glass that whoever created the poster believes would work best with each one. I’m not sure I agree with every choice, but at least some styles are listed with multiple glassware. That suggests that none of this is written in stone, which we all know, of course.

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Click here to see the poster full size.

Solo Cup Serving Suggestions

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Today’s infographic is something of a coincidence. In the summer of last year, some unknown person posted the graphic below showing what they believed the lines around those ubiquitous red Solo cups you find at countless parties might mean.

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Click here to see this only a little bit bigger.

And it was fairly compelling, but the Solo company said it was not intentional. According to Business Insider, “It turns out that while Solo Cup lines match up pretty closely with appropriate servings for beer, wine and liquor, they aren’t really meant for that. It’s just Solo Cup folklore.” Solo also posted their own infographic on their Facebook page, with alternate suggestions for what the lines could be used for, perhaps preferring not to have them associated exclusive;y with alcohol.

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Click here to see Solo’s rebuttal graphic full size.