Beer In Ads #1410: A Blue Ribbon Christmas


Saturday’s holiday ad is for Pabst Blue Ribbon, from 1941. “Isn’t Christmas Fun?” A frazzled husband responds. “Could Be! If You’d Only Give Me A “33 to 1″ Chance!” Eventually his wife understands, and he enjoys a beer before turning into a decorating demon, prompting her to suggest he may be getting a whole case of PBRs on Christmas Day.

Pabst-1941-xmas

Beer In Ads #1404: The Height Of Hospitality


Sunday’s ad is for Pabst Blue Ribbon, from 1911. I love the outfit on the server, that must be some posh establishment he works for. I love that Pabst is working so hard to position PBR as the classy beer, and especially this sentiment: “Pabst Blue Ribbon is the ultimate choice of all who have a keen faculty of selection.” Priceless. People who who are good at picking things?

Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer. Judge magazine, June 10, 1911

Beer In Ads #1391: Spring Ills


Monday’s ad is yet another one for Pabst, again from 1897. The ad shows the Boston Tea Party, with cartons of tea leaves being dumped into the harbor. Another patriotic moment, another reminder how healthful Pabst Malt Extract can be, especially how it can cure so many spring ills. There’s even a list of what it can cure: enervation, fatigue, thin blood, anaemia, exhaustion, lack of vitality, weakness, nervousness, sleeplessness and slow recovery from a winter’s sickness.

pabst_1897_1

Beer In Ads #1390: The First Inauguration


Sunday’s ad is still another one for Pabst, also from 1897. The ad shows what is purported to be the “First Inauguration” — it looks like George Washington — yet I’m always amazed that we tend to simply ignore the ten presidents of Congress who preceded Washington under the Articles of Confederation, not to mention the fourteen people who served as president of the continental congress before that. In our collective image of American history, we seemingly just leap from 1776 to Washington’s inauguration thirteen years later, on April 30, 1789, as if that previous decade didn’t even exist. Climbing down off my soapbox, with Pabst Malt Extract, apparently, you won’t have to worry about dyspepsia or indigestion.

pabst_1897_2

Beer In Ads #1389: Take Up The Slack!


Saturday’s ad is another one for Pabst, also from 1897. The ad shows Commodore Perry, the other one — the Hero of Lake Erie — standing in a small rowboat at the end of the battle, and I can only assume he said something like “take up the slack.” I’m not quite sure what “Perry’s Victory” has to do with Pabst Malt Extract, but it’s another in a series of patriotic ads using incidents throughout American history to sell Pabst.

pabst_1897_3

Beer In Ads #1388: The Light Of Liberty


Friday’s ad is another one for Pabst, again from 1897. The ad shows the Old North Church, in Boston, Massachusetts, the one that had as many as two lamps hanging from its steeple, “one if by land, and two if by sea” depending on where the British were coming from, according to the story of Paul Revere. Apparently Pabst Malt Extract, “the best tonic,” will put anyone to sleep, even with those annoying lights streaming through the curtain windows.

pabst_1897_4

Beer In Ads #1387: Perfection In Brewing Is Reached In America


Thursday’s ad is another one for Pabst, again from 1897. The ad shows the Mayflower — Happy Thanksgiving — and is using that, I think, to suggest that since Europeans arrived in America, that now, 400+ years later, brewing perfection has been achieved through Pabst Malt Extract. Let’s just say I’m skeptical.

pabst_1897_6

Beer In Ads #1365: Finest Beer Served … Again!


Wednesday’s ad is for Pabst Blue Ribbon, from 1950. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular, though in case I’m a little glad it’s in black and white. In this second similar ad for Pabst, they’re advertising with two guy — father and son? — apparently leaning over the edge of a swimming pool, with the tagline “finest beer served … anywhere!” That, of they’re taking part in a contest to see who can make the most ridiculous face.

Pabst-1950-dolas-2