Beer In Ads #1328: What Products, Besides Beer, Come From The Brewing Industry?


Monday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What products, besides beer, come from the Brewing Industry?

A
Vitamins, yeast and cattle feeds are important industry by-products.

Apparently brewing yeast is the best source of B vitamins every found, and it even may have rid the world of pellagra, “the dread diet-deficiency disease” that I’ve never heard of, although it persists in Africa, Indonesia, North Korea and China. Then there’s also spent grain given as feed for livestock, as common then as now.

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Beer In Ads #1326: What Famed Scientist Is Closely Linked To The Brewing Of Beer?


Saturday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What famed scientist is closely linked to the brewing of beer?

A
Louis Pasteur, who evolved “pasteurization” through observing the action of yeast.

The ad details pasteur’s important work, “Studies on Beer,” published in 1876.

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Beer In Ads #1325: What Great Americans Favored Beer As A Beverage Of Moderation?


Friday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What great Americans favored beer as a beverage of moderation?

A
Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Patrick Henry — to name just a few.

This ad details a few of the founding fathers’ relationship with beer, and also mentions Samuel Adams, in addition to the four listed in the headline answer.

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Beer In Ads #1324: How Does Our Educational System Benefit From The Brewing Industry?


Thursday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
How does our educational system benefit from the Brewing Industry?

A
State beer taxes help build schools and provide salaries for teachers.

According to the ad, that’s where a lot of the $193 million in state excise taxes paid by the brewing industry go. And this is addition to the $700 million in federal excise taxes they refer to other ads in this series.

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Beer In Ads #1323: How Much Federal Excise Tax Has The Brewing Industry Paid Since Repeal?


Wednesday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
How much Federal excise tax has the Brewing Industry paid since Repeal?

A
More than 7 billion dollars — almost 1 1/2 billion in the past two years.

Trying to put that into perspective, they claim that this amount is twice what the U.S. government spent on the Marshall Plan. Perhaps more impressive, it’s apparently the “fourth largest amount paid by any industry.”

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Beer In Ads #1322: How Much Is The Brewing Industry Paying Into The U.S. Treasury?


Tuesday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
How much is the Brewing Industry paying into the U.S. Treasury?

A
Nearly $700 million annually — half again as much as the 1950 Federal provision for highways.

This figure is just for federal excise taxes, and they claim that that amount is $200 more than the entire amount spent by the federal government on U.S. highways and also is greater than how much we spent on atomic energy during the first two years we were developing it.

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Beer In Ads #1321: How Popular Is Beer In America Today?


Monday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
How popular is beer in America today?

A
Beer is now served in about two out of three homes in America.

The number cited in the ad, 62.2%, is confusing. In the text it says it applies to “all Americans” but in the headline it seems to be “households.” It’s also unclear if that number is in relation to other alcoholic beverages: is it two-thirds of drinkers, or two-thirds of all persons, teetotalers included. Most surveys today are of the former kind, and show beer’s percentage hovering around 40%, plus or minus a few percentage points each year.

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Beer In Ads #1320: What Was The Menu Of The First Thanksgiving Menu?


Sunday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What was the menu of the first Thanksgiving menu?

A
The Pilgrims and their Indian guests had game, seafood, vegetables, and beer.

“According to a written record by an historian of the time” — curiously unnamed — beer was in the table at the first Thanksgiving, in part, because then, as now, “beer was all but the universal beverage.”

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Beer In Ads #1319: What Was Thomas Jefferson’s Attitude On Beer And Brewing?


Saturday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
What was Thomas Jefferson’s attitude on beer and brewing?

A
He brought brewers to this country because he wanted to beer to become popular here.

Jefferson also built a brewery at Monticello after his retirement from politics. Before that, his wife Martha brewed 15-gallon batches every two weeks on their Virginia estate. But in his seventies, he hired English brewer Joseph Miller and the pair built a dedicated brewing room and beer cellar at Monticello, where he malted his own grain and grew hops. Jefferson bottled most of his beer, and sealed the bottles with corks. I believe he did say the bit about beer becoming common, in 1816. The full quote is “I wish to see this beverage become common instead of the whiskey which kills one-third of our citizens and ruins their families.” But my favorite Jefferson quote is this. “Beer, if drunk in moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit and promotes health.”

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Beer In Ads #1318: Are Most American Breweries “Large” Or “Small” Businesses


Friday’s ad is another one from the United States Brewers Foundation, from 1951. This a series of ads they did in 1951 using a Q&A format aimed at highlighting different positive aspects of beer and the brewing industry.

Q
Are most American breweries “large” or “small” businesses?

A
Small, individually — although the Brewing Industry as a whole ranks 13th in America.

Interestingly, the way the defined “small breweries” was not barrels brewed or the amount sold, but by the number of employees. They defined a small brewery as one with less than 500 workers, saying the average was less than 200. Using that metric, 409 of the 440-then active breweries they defined as being small. I wonder how that would work out today? I suspect only 2 of the more than 3,000 breweries open today have anything close to 500 employees.

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