Beer In Ads #1955: World Series U.S.A.


Monday’s ad is entitled World Series U.S.A., and the illustration was done in 1953 by John Falter. It’s #86 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a group of people have brought their television set out on the front porch to drink beer and eat hot dogs and watch the World Series. Notice that the table it’s sitting on has wheels, suggesting moving it around was a common occurrence. I don’t think we ever moved our television. And was watching outside a thing people did? I remember in one of my favorite films, “Frequency” (a kind of time travelish thriller), they also watched the 1969 World Series on their front porch, and that would have been 16 years after the ad ran. Still, it looks like they’re having fun.

086. World Series U.S.A. by John Falter, 1953

Beer In Ads #1954: After The Ride


Sunday’s ad is entitled After the Ride, and the illustration was done in 1953 by John Falter. It’s #85 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a family, or at least the young’uns, have come from riding their horses and are relaxing with beer. Unlike in our household, someone else is washing a horse, while the riders do nothing.

085. After the Ride by John Falter, 1953

Beer In Ads #1953: Picnic On The Bay


Saturday’s ad is entitled Picnic on the Bay, and the illustration was done in 1953 by John Falter. It’s #84 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a fourth couple arrives by sailboat to the dock of a home right on the bay. Given the hill in the background, it does look a bit like it could be Marin County, where we lived for a time. This is another uncommon ad showing just cans, which makes sense given the location, but then they’re also using glass which does not make any sense.

084. Picnic on the Bay by John Falter, 1953

Beer In Ads #1952: After The Summer Theatre


Friday’s ad is entitled After the Summer Theatre, and the illustration was done in 1953 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #83 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a couple is just back home from a night out at the summer theatre. They’re relaxing and having a few beers and a late night snack. By relaxing, I mean she’s still in her gown, but at least he’s taken off his tuxedo jacket. So they’ve really let their hair down.

083. After the Summer Theatre by Douglass Crockwell, 1953

Beer In Ads #1951: Preview Of The Wedding Presents


Thursday’s ad is entitled Preview Of The Wedding Presents, and the illustration was done in 1953 by Haddon Sundblom. It’s #82 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a social event is taking place that I confess I don’t really understand. I always thought wedding gifts were wrapped so that no one, except the giver, knew what the gift was. But this is a “Preview Of The Wedding Presents” and people are drinking beer and looking at the gifts for a wedding. Were they wrapped? Will they re-wrap them? Why on Earth would you want to see your presents before you open them? That’s assuming that the bride and groom are even there, but I assume that’s supposed to be the bride front and center wearing white with a pen and notebook to list every present at the table next to her. This is one I really don’t understand.

082. Preview of the Wedding Presents by Haddon Sundblom, 1953

Beer In Ads #1950: First Fine Day Of Spring


Wednesday’s ad is entitled First Fine Day Of Spring, and the illustration was done in 1953 by John Gannam. It’s #81 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, which looks more impressionist than previous ones, several couples are enjoying the first decently warm day of spring. Still wearing jackets and long sleeves, they’ve got lots of beer to keep them warm.

081. First Fine Day of Spring by John Gannam, 1953

Beer In Ads #1949: First Catch Of The Season


Tuesday’s ad is entitled First Catch of the Season, and the illustration was done in 1953 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #80 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a departure from the earlier ads, a series of ten smaller illustrations tells a story of fishing, beer, fish and beer and fish, and of course the one that got away.

080. First Catch of the Season by Douglass Crockwell, 1953

Beer In Ads #1947: Four Hands On The Keyboard


Sunday’s ad is entitled Four Hands On The Keyboard, and the illustration was done in 1953 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #78 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, a large party has consumed so much beer that two of them sat down at a piano and are belting out tunes. BUt look at the expression on the woman in the red dress. She is not amused.

078. Four Hands on the Keyboard by Douglass Crockwell, 1953

Beer In Ads #1946: Mother’s Night Off


Saturday’s ad is entitled Mother’s Night Off, and the illustration was done in 1953 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #77 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, Mom didn’t have to cook one evening after working nonstop since got married fifty years ago. Instead, Dad and his son appear to have cooked, while sister (or possible daughter-in-law) lights the candles. She probably set the table and poured the beer, too. There’s a whole lot of smiling going on. Even Mom is smirking.

077. Mother's Night Off by Douglass Crockwell, 1953

Beer In Ads #1945: Holiday Buffett


Friday’s ad is entitled Holiday Buffett, and the illustration was done in 1952 by Douglass Crockwell. It’s #76 in a series entitled “Home Life in America,” also known as the Beer Belongs series of ads that the United States Brewers Foundation ran from 1945 to 1956. In this ad, another couple is arriving at a Christmas party already in progress. They’ve got some catching up to do, since everyone has a beer in their hand. I hope that centerpiece tree is not their only one, but I do remember relatives having small, pathetic trees in the sixties when I was a kid. But if there’s room for a holiday buffet, then it’s too small.

076. Holiday Buffet by Douglass Crockwell, 1952