Beer In Ads #2108: This Calls For … Open House


Sunday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1962. In this ad, part of series entitled “This calls for …,” in this case “Open House.” A holiday party, an “open house” type of brouhaha, is taking place and the host went all out by serving cans of Bud. I do love the expression of the woman putting food in her mouth while staring at the man pouring a beer.

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Anchor Christmas Ale 1988

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It’s day fourteen of my fall flight to Christmas featuring all 42 labels from Anchor’s Christmas Ale — a.k.a. Our Special Ale — all different beers (well, mostly different) and all different labels, each one designed by local artist Jim Stitt, up to and including this year’s label.

1988 was the fourteenth year that Anchor made their Christmas Ale, and this year marked the second year that Anchor’s Our Special Ale included spices. Like last year’s, a spiced brown ale was created for the year’s Christmas Ale. This fourteenth label was a “White Spruce” or “Picea glauca.”

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Anchor Christmas Ale 1987

xmas-christmas-ale
It’s day thirteen of my train to Christmas featuring all 42 labels from Anchor’s Christmas Ale — a.k.a. Our Special Ale — all different beers (well, mostly different) and all different labels, each one designed by local artist Jim Stitt, up to and including this year’s label.

1987 was the thirteenth year that Anchor made their Christmas Ale, and this year marked the first year that Anchor’s Our Special Ale included spices. Last year’s brown ale was used as the base for a spiced Bridale for Fritz Maytag’s wedding in early 1987. That recipe became this 1987 Christmas Ale. This thirteenth label was a “Douglas Fir” and a “Coast Redwood,” or “Pseudotsuga menziesii and Sequoia sempervirens.”

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Anchor Christmas Ale 1986

xmas-christmas-ale
It’s day twelve of my Black Friday bound to Christmas featuring all 42 labels from Anchor’s Christmas Ale — a.k.a. Our Special Ale — all different beers (well, mostly different) and all different labels, each one designed by local artist Jim Stitt, up to and including this year’s label.

1986 was the twelfth year that Anchor made their Christmas Ale, and this year the beer was another brown ale, their third one, though it was different from the two previous year’s offering, and still with no spices added. But this was also the last beer Anchor made without spices. This twelfth label was a “Golden Chinquapin,” or “Castanopsis chrysophylla.”

Anchor-Xmas-1986

Beer In Ads #2104: A Tradition In Hospitality


Thursday’s Thanksgiving Day ad is for Budweiser, from 1963. Because of the holiday, I’m taking a break from the “This calls for …” series to bring you “A Tradition in Hospitality,” a holiday-themed ad with a big ass turkey. Ours actually looked beer (it was a Willie Bird, after all) and I served better beer, and we also didn’t have a Jell-O mold anything, but otherwise a beautifully festive setting. Happy Thanksgiving!

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Anchor Christmas Ale 1985

xmas-christmas-ale
It’s day eleven of my Thanksgiving escape to Christmas featuring all 42 labels from Anchor’s Christmas Ale — a.k.a. Our Special Ale — all different beers (well, mostly different) and all different labels, each one designed by local artist Jim Stitt, up to and including this year’s label.

1985 was the eleventh year that Anchor made their Christmas Ale, and this year the beer was another brown ale, their second one, though it was different from the previous year’s offering, and still with no spices added. This eleventh label was a “Pacific Madrone,” or “Arbutus menziesii.”

Anchor-Xmas-1985

Beer In Ads #2103: This Calls For … Out In The Kitchen


Wednesday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1962. In this ad, part of series entitled “This calls for …,” in this case “Out In The Kitchen.” Curiously, this ad almost exactly mirrors another ad from the same year, one that was called the Neighbors. But that ad had four African-American men in virtually the same positions as the four caucasians in this one. It’s even the same kitchen, although it’s been redecorated. You see that the chairs and cabinets are absolutely the same, but the tablecloth and wallpaper have been changed. It’s kind of hilarious. For all I know, they ran at the same time, but in publications with very different readerships.

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