Beer In Ads #2183: Heineken Refreshes The Concorde


Friday’s ad is for Heineken, from 1976. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a two-panel format, a Concorde jet is looking a little tired and suffering drooping nose. But after a fill-up from the Heineken fuel truck, the plane’s nose is no longer dropping, but is raring to go. The plane, somehow, is now smiling, too. I wonder why it never caught on to refer to beer as “jet fuel?”

Heineken-1976-concorde

Beer In Ads #2182: Heineken Refreshes Mustaches


Thursday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1970s. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a three-panel vertical format, the first panel shows a chubby, bespectacled man with a droopy mustache. After sipping some Heineken, his ‘stache is standing tall. Stiff as a board and ready for action. That must be why he’s smiling.

Heineken-1970s-mustache

Beer In Ads #2181: Heineken Refreshes Steel Girders


Wednesday’s ad is for Heineken, from 1977. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a two-panel format, a man is carrying a large steel girder, balanced on his head, while carrying a full mug of beer. It’s obviously a poke at Guinness advertising, which had a similar ad with a man carrying a girder. The girder is bent in a curve, essentially drooping in the front and back, as if he was carrying something limp. But in the second panel, after he’s drank some of his beer, the girder has stiffened up and is straight as an arrow. Plus the man has gone from frowning to wearing a smile, but I’m sure that’s just a coincidence.

2014HH4091

Beer In Ads #2180: Heineken Refreshes Humpty Dumpty


Tuesday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1970s. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a two-panel vertical format, the Mother Goose character Humpty Dumpty has already had his great fall, and is sitting on the grass beneath the wall he’s just fallen from with cracked noggin. He looks like he’s in pretty bad shape. And while “[a]ll the king’s horses and all the king’s men, couldn’t put Humpty together again,” one sip from a mug of Heineken and he’s good as gold, right as rain and fit as a fiddle. He’s even back on his wall, with a smile on the face of his now intact body, with a blue sky at his back. That’s some damn powerful beer.

mike-cozens-heineken-humpty

Beer In Ads #2179: Heineken Refreshes Shakin’ Stevens


Monday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1970s. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a three-panel format, the British rock ‘n’ roll singer Shakin’ Stevens — “the UK’s biggest-selling singles artist of the 1980s” — can’t stop shaking. His real name is Michael Barratt, with his stage name adopted when his band changed its name to Shakin’ Stevens and the Sunsets. Somehow in the second panel he manages to hold a mug of Heineken to his lips and take a sip, which promptly cures him of shaking.

Heineken-1970s-shakin-stevens

Beer In Ads #2178: Heineken Refreshes Hedgehogs


Sunday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1970s. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a three-panel format, a hedgehog is about to cross the road. I suspect this ad ran in Europe, or possibly Great Britain, since there are no hedgehogs in the Americas. And perhaps like raccoons or skunks for us, they’re frequently being hit by cars trying to cross the road. But this smart hedgehog drank some Heineken, which magically supplied him with a safety vest to increase the odds of him (or her) making it to the other side of the road. Good luck Spiny Norman.

Heineken-1970s-hedgehog

Beer In Ads #2177: Heineken Refreshes King Kong


Saturday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1970s. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a three-panel format, King Kong is eyeing Fay Wray but seems confused in the first panel. So, in the second, he drinks from a tanker truck of Heineken, which causes them to become relatively the same size. What remains unclear is whether the beer made him smaller, or her larger. And while I admit that doesn’t make sense, the airplanes are the same size so it could have gone either way.

Heineken-1970s-king-kong

Beer In Ads #2176: Heineken Refreshes Ceramic Mugs


Friday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1979. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a two-panel format, a frowning ceramic mug featuring an 18th century wigged Englishman wearing a black hat and a red coat with a frilly white shirt. But pour some beer down his neck, literally, and that frown turns upside down, into a full-fledged smile.

Heineken-1979-mug

Ballantine’s Literary Ads: James A. Michener

ballantine
Between 1951 and 1953, P. Ballantine and Sons Brewing Company, or simply Ballentine Beer, created a series of ads with at least thirteen different writers. They asked each one “How would you put a glass of Ballantine Ale into words?” Each author wrote a page that included reference to their beer, and in most cases not subtly. One of them was James A. Michener, who’s best known for Tales of the South Pacific.

Today is the birthday of James A. Michener (February 3, 1907–October 16, 1997), who “was an American author of more than 40 books, the majority of which were fictional, lengthy family sagas covering the lives of many generations in particular geographic locales and incorporating solid history. Michener was known for the popularity of his works; he had numerous bestsellers and works selected for Book of the Month Club. He was also known for his meticulous research behind the books.

Michener’s novels include Tales of the South Pacific for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1948, Hawaii, The Drifters, Centennial, The Source, The Fires of Spring, Chesapeake, Caribbean, Caravans, Alaska, Texas and Poland. His non-fiction works include Iberia, about his travels in Spain and Portugal; his memoir titled The World Is My Home, and Sports in America. Return to Paradise combines fictional short stories with Michener’s factual descriptions of the Pacific areas where they take place.”

ballantine-1951-Michener

His piece for Ballantine was done in the form of a letter of recommendation:

Ale, as Ballantine brews it, is one of man’s noblest drinks, and I speak from more than a passing acquaintance with the great beers and ales of the world.

In Ballantine Ale one finds the refreshing thirst-quenching qualities so welcome on a warm day; but hidden in its amber depths is a goodness, a character, a strong satisfying flavor, found in no other brewed beverage.

I commend Ballantine Ale to you as a thirst-quencher, a lesiure-time glass eminently designed to promote sociability.

ballantine-1951-Michener-text

Beer In Ads #2175: Heineken Refreshes The Ugly Duckling


Thursday’s ad is for Heineken, from the 1977. In the later 1970s, Heineken embarked on a series of ads with the tagline “Heineken Refreshes the Parts Other Beers Cannot Reach.” Many of the ads were in a sequential panel, or comic strip, format and they were intended to be humorous.

In this ad, a three-panel format, the ugly duckling is crying over his treatment at the hands (or wings?) of the prettier ducklings, when he happens upon a can of beer floating in the pond. Taking a sip, he’s transformed in to a beautiful white swan. Talk about beer goggles.

Ugly-Duckling-1977