Beer In Ads #1372: It Was Rugged, Mates


Wednesday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1962. A sailor at a bar telling tall tales. What are the odds? In this story, “it was rugged, mates,” our intrepid man of the sea begins. “33 days in a lifeboat and worst of all no Schlitz!” No Tiger, either, but can that really be the worst thing? Sounds like this must not be the first retelling.

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Beer In Ads #1371: Over The Border From Canada .. Comes


Tuesday’s ad is for Carling’s Canadian (Red Cap) Ale, from 1934. I like tat the ad is effectively showing one way to get through border security, though I don’t suppose that’s what they had in mind for this Canadian beer that — wait for it — was brewed in Ohio. And I love that the reason they decided to make it was for those “admirable people who have been impatiently waiting for someone in America to brew a real Canadian ale.” And according to the ad copy, “you’re going to like it.” Why? Because “it’s a palatable, hearty, comforting drink for a man’s man. That’s certain.” But what about the ladies, you may be asking yourself? Not to worry. “And for the girl who shoots and paddles and swings a wicked mashie.” Don’t do any of those things? Then stay the fuck away from this beer, you’re not the right kind of girl for Red Cap.

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Beer In Ads #1370: These 39 Colossi Break A Tradition


Monday’s ad is for Alloa Aluminum, from 1934. The thirty-nine “Colssi” in the headline refer to three-story tall aluminum fermenters being installed at the Hoffman Beverage Co. of Newark, New Jersey, which brewed from 1934 until it was bought by Pabst in 1946, who kept it going until 1985. But when this ad ran, it was a brand new brewery going into production the year after prohibition ended. And apparently, they were expecting to be pretty successful from the get go, because 39 fermenters is quite a lot to start out.

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Beer In Ads #1369: Did Somebody Say Ballantine At The Beach


Sunday’s ad is yet another one for Ballantine Ale, this one from 1946. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular. In this ad for Ballantine, they’re advertising with a man at the beach, buried in the sand. Wearing quite the floppy hat, and a goofy grin. An unseen person is holding a bottle of beer in front of him, apparently saying; “Did Somebody Say Ballantine.” I think they’ll have to hold the bottle to his lips and tip his head back, too.

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Beer In Ads #1368: Did Somebody Say Ballantine


Saturday’s ad is yet another one for Ballantine Ale, this one from 1946. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular. In this ad for Ballantine, they’re advertising with a man fishing, reeling in a big one. Apparently, over his shoulder he heard something. “Did Somebody Say Ballantine.” Happily, there’s a delivery on the horizon.

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Beer In Ads #1367: You’re Next Ballantine


Friday’s ad is another one for Ballantine Ale, again from 1950. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular. In this ad for Ballantine, they’re advertising with what appears to be a typo. Punctuation matters. What’s on the billboard is “You’re next Ballantine,” as in “you are next Ballantine,” but next for what? It seems like it would make more sense as “Your next Ballantine,” especially since the woman in the ad is holding a beer out, as if to hand it to you, or at least the next person to stop. She seems to be showing you your next beer rather than warning the brewery that they’re next.

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Beer In Ads #1366: You’ll Swing To Ballantine Ale!


Thursday’s ad is for Ballantine Ale, from 1950. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular. In this ad for Ballantine, they’re advertising with a curious slogan, “You’ll swing to Ballantine Ale!” But I like the idea of a man pointing at drivers as they pass by, a giant bow-tied man smiling from on high, his expression seeming to say, or even smirk, “drink.”

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Beer In Ads #1365: Finest Beer Served … Again!


Wednesday’s ad is for Pabst Blue Ribbon, from 1950. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular, though in case I’m a little glad it’s in black and white. In this second similar ad for Pabst, they’re advertising with two guy — father and son? — apparently leaning over the edge of a swimming pool, with the tagline “finest beer served … anywhere!” That, of they’re taking part in a contest to see who can make the most ridiculous face.

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Beer In Ads #1363: Finest Beer Served … Anywhere!


Monday’s ad is for Pabst Blue Ribbon, from 1950. This is from a series of billboard ads from around the same time I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular, though in case I’m a little glad it’s in black and white. In this ad for Pabst, they’re advertising with two lads — bellhops? — a beer on a silver tray, with the tagline “finest beer served … anywhere!”

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