Beer In Ads #1401: Every Drop Tells You Why


Thursday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1965. It’s gatefold two-pager, with an empty bottle of Bud on its side. Only some residual foam remains in the bottle, slowly dripping out, with the tagline “… Every drop tells you why Budweiser is the largest-selling beer in the world.” But does it? Does it really? I remain unconvinced.

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Beer In Ads #1400: Windisch-Muhlhauser Brewing Co.


Wednesday’s ad is for the Windisch-Muhlhauser Brewing Co., from some time in the late 1800s. The brewery was founded in 1866, in Cincinnati, by Conrad Windisch and Gottleib and Heinrich Muhlhauser, but was later known as the Lion Brewery and later the Burger Brewing Co., before closing in either 1934 or 1973, depending on whose account you believe.

Windisch-Muhlhauser-1800s

Beer In Ads #1399: H. Clausen & Son


Tuesday’s ad is for Bock Beer by H. Clausen & Son, from 1879. According to BeerHistory.com’s page Brewing in America in 1879, there were 365 breweries in New York at that time, and H. Clausen & Son was the 9th largest, with barrels sold just under 90,000. it was located at 47th St. & 2nd Ave. The Library of Congress describes the ad as “showing a woman sitting back with her legs up, balancing on one foot a barrel with a goat standing on it; she is holding up a large glass of beer.” I think it looks more like a child, though, not a woman. Either way, what an odd position.

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Beer In Ads #1397: The Tables Turned — The Dream


Sunday’s ad is for MacLachlans’ Castle Ale, from 1928. The beer was brewed in Edinburgh, on Duddingston Road West, and at other times the brewery was also called Tennent’s Brewery, and apparently they also had a brewery in Glasgow, and operated until around 1955. I love the surreal idea that people are chasing a running bottle of beer. I think they’re at a track with an audience of dogs, because normally it would be people drinking beer in the stands watching dogs racing while chasing a rabbit. That’s not a dream, it’s a nightmare.

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Beer In Ads #1396: Clear To The Last Drop


Saturday’s ad is for Kaka Ale, or Dunedin Ale (which is also on the label), from between 1914-1918, based on the ad copy “drink success to the Allies. The beer was made by the W. Strachin & Co. brewery, also known as The Victoria Brewery. According to the Alexander Turnbull Library, it was founded in Dunedin, New Zealand in 1857 or 1860 by William Strachan and partners and by 1890 was the oldest brewery in Dunedin, and possibly New Zealand. But that tagline — “Clear To The Last Drop” — priceless.

Kaka

Beer In Ads #1392: Budweiser Welcomes America Back


Tuesday’s ad is for Budweiser, from 1933. The ad is celebrating the end of prohibition, which is what they’re referring to when they say America is back, saying both “liberty” and “Budweiser” have returned. But I love the tagline toward the bottom where they refer to Budweiser as “Something More Than Beer.” More how, I wonder?

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Beer In Ads #1391: Spring Ills


Monday’s ad is yet another one for Pabst, again from 1897. The ad shows the Boston Tea Party, with cartons of tea leaves being dumped into the harbor. Another patriotic moment, another reminder how healthful Pabst Malt Extract can be, especially how it can cure so many spring ills. There’s even a list of what it can cure: enervation, fatigue, thin blood, anaemia, exhaustion, lack of vitality, weakness, nervousness, sleeplessness and slow recovery from a winter’s sickness.

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