Patent No. 4275097A: Protective Coating For Cans And Methods For Application Of Coating Thereto

patent-logo
Today in 1981, US Patent 4275097 A was issued, an invention of Frank L. Shriver, assigned to the Coors Container Company, for his “Protective Coating for Cans and Methods for Application of Coating Thereto.” Here’s the Abstract:

Apparatus and methods of applying a thin narrow width coating to can body members comprising a feed control means associated with a guideway means for causing rotating moving of the can body members across an elongated coating applicator roller member extending parallel to the path of movement of the can body members, the rotation of and spacing of the can body members and the rotation of the applicator roller member being controlled to apply the coating during substantially only one revolution of the can body member and less than one revolution of the roller member.




Odds & Ends For The Next Session

session-the
For 101st Session, our host will be Jack Perdue, who writes Deep Beer. For his topic, he’s asking us to look beyond what’s in the bottle, and to the bottle itself, along with the crown, the label, the carrier, the mother carton and all of the odds and ends, or detritus, that go into the beer’s packaging, or as he explains what he has in mind for the July Session, the “Bottles, Caps and Other Beer Detritus,” which he describes below.

There are many great creative people involved in the beer industry: the brewers designing and creating the stuff of our attention, marketers bringing the product to market, graphic artists making the products attractive and informative and writers who tell the story of beer. The list goes on. And thus, many great products, that may or may not get your attention. The focus is on the liquid inside the bottle, can or keg, and rightly so. What about all the other products necessary to bring that beer to you? What about the things that are necessary but are easily overlooked and discarded. This months theme is, “Bottles, Caps and Other Beer Detritus”.

Detritus, according to one definition in the Merriam Webster Dictionary is “miscellaneous remnants : odds and ends”. While the number and quality of our beer choices has certainly improved over the recent decade, have you paid any attention to the rest of the package. Those things we normally glance over and throw away when we have poured and finished our beer. These are sometimes works of art in themselves. Bottle caps, labels, six-pack holders, even the curvature of the bottle. For this month’s The Session theme, I’m asking contributors to share their thoughts on these things, the tangential items to our obsession. Do you have any special fetish with bottle caps, know of someone that is doing creative things with packaging, have a beer bottle or coaster collection.

So drink the beer, but then think about what’s left over when it’s gone.

bottles-colors

Let us know about the bits and pieces from your point of view. To participate in the July Session, leave a comment to the original announcement, with , on or before Friday, July 3.

beer-crown-rainbow

Patent No. 3889725A: Method Of Filling Beer Cans

patent-logo
Today in 1975, US Patent 3889725 A was issued, an invention of Werner Heckmann, Heinz Jordan, Uwe Knabe, Karl Plock, Karl Quest, Friedrich Rademacher, and Dieter Unger, assigned to Holstein & Kappert Maschf, for their “Method of Filling Beer Cans or the Like.” Here’s the Abstract:

The supported devices in an apparatus which fills beer cans orbit about a vertical axis and have upright housings supporting cylindrical centering members which carry deformable gaskets for the mouths of cans. Such cans are supported by a conveyor which orbits with the filling devices and is movable up and down or is held against vertical movement during rotation with the filling devices. The introduction of liquid into the cans takes place subsequent to introduction of a compressed gas, and such gas can be used to bias the gaskets against the mouths of cans during filling. When the filling of a can is completed, the pressure in its interior is increased to facilitate separation from the respective gasket. That supply of beer which remains in a channel of the housing on closing of the beer-admitting valve can be expelled in response to expansion of gas in a chamber which receives such gas by way of the container and is sealed from the container by beer in the channel. The expansion of gas in the chamber takes place in response to opening of a valve which reduces the pressure of gas above the body of liquid in the container.

Untitled
Untitled
Untitled

Patent No. 4838419A: Keg Board

patent-logo
Today in 1989, US Patent 4838419 A was issued, an invention of Ferdinand Weits, William F. Mekelburg and Marc R. Latour, assigned to the Adolph Coors Company, for their “Keg Board.” Here’s the Abstract:

A keg board for use in stacking beer kegs and the like in an upright orientation during storage and transporation of the kegs comprising: a generally planar surface for engaging and supporting a generally planar end surface of each keg; and pockets operatively associated with the planar surface for limiting relative lateral shifting movement of the kegs such as caused by shocks and vibration associated with transporting of the kegs.

Untitled

Untitled Untitled

Untitled

Patent No. 856400A: Bottle-Seal

patent-logo
Today in 1907, US Patent 856400 A was issued, an invention of King C. Gillette, for his “Bottle-Seal.” And yes, that’s the same King Gillette who invented the safety razor. There’s no Abstract, although in the description it states that his “invention relates to bottle seals, especially to that class of devices used to close bottles, or vessels containing beer, mineral water, and the like where a cheap seal is desired; and the object of this invention is to provide a seal that will be cheap to manufacture and efficient in use.”

It is the object of the present invention to provide a seal so constructed that rubber can be used instead of cork, and at the same time provide means. to prevent the contents of the bottle coming in contact with the rubber; a further object being to provide a device wherein but a very small sealing ring is required and at the same time provide means to hold this ring in place in the cap while being transported from the factory to the consumer, and while applying the stopper to a bottle.

Untitled

Patent No. 3037431A: Carton Feeding, Erecting And Filling Mechanism

patent-logo
Today in 1962, US Patent 3037431 A was issued, an invention of Leonard McGihon of San Leandro, California, assigned to the King-O-Matic Equipment Corp., for his “Carton Feeding, Erecting And Filling Mechanism” There’s no Abstract, although there’s a paragraph in the description that summarizes it nicely.

The present invention relates to mechanism for taking respective folded cartons, successively from a stack, opening these cartons to a box-like form with open sides, feeding cans or other containers in groups into the carton through the open sides thereof, and then closing the cartons so as to provide a carry-home pack of the containers in the carton. The various operations take place in sequence and continuously to provide a rapid and efficient method of packing containers in cartons, for example beer cans packed in the familiar six-pack cartons as now commonly on the market. More particularly, the instant mechanism is designed to operate on a carton of a character having a closed rectangular shape with partially open sides, the open sides being provided with connected or continuous side flap portions, the respective adjacent side flaps of each corner being connected by a gusset type fold. In this type of carton, the folding of the flaps attached to the end panels of the carton tucks these flaps behind the containers or cans in the carton and effectively holds the carton closed during shipment and handling, but provides for easy opening by the user.

Untitled
Untitled
Untitled

Untitled Untitled

Untitled Untitled

Patent No. 784596A: Filling Apparatus For Liquids

patent-logo
Today in 1905, US Patent 784596 A was issued, an invention of Simon Schlangen, for his “Filling Apparatus for Liquids.” There’s no Abstract per se, but this is pretty close, from the introduction:

The invention relates more particularly to apparatus for filling barrels, kegs, and similar packages with liquid, such as beer, under pressure, and has for its objects to improve the suspending means by which the closing head and filling-tube are carried, so as to insure the proper contact of the closing-head with the bung-hole or filling-hole of the barrel, keg, or package, to insure the positive opening-of the valve controlling the discharge of the filling-tube when the filling-tube has reached the limit of its descent, to improve the construction and operation of the appliance carrying the closing-head and the filling tube in connection with a fluid-pressure cylinder having therein a piston by which the cross-heads carrying the closing-head and the filling-tube are raised and lowered, to utilize the waste pressure from the filling-package in actuating’ the piston by which the closing head and the filling-tube are raised and lowered, to place the control of the pressure and the liquid under a single valve, to improve the construction and operation of the valve by which the fiI’Iid-pressure and the liquid are controlled, to improve the means by which the inflow and outflow of the pressure between the filling-tank and the to be filled package is regulated and controlled, to prevent the foaming of the liquid within the package and insure the fillingI of the package with the liquid to its full capacity without waste of liquid, to furnish an intermediate controlling means for the pressure between the one controlling-valve and the to be filled package by which the flow of the pressure in either direction will be regulated and controlled, to furnish a relief-valve by means of which the requisite amount of pressure from outside will be supplied to prevent an explosion at the withdrawal of the filling-tube, and to improve generally the construction and operation of the several parts and mechanisms which enter into the “construction of the apparatus as a whole.

US784596-0
US784596-2

US784596-3 US784596-4

US784596-5 US784596-7

US784596-6

Patent No. 2233904A: Bottle Cap

patent-logo
Today in 1941, US Patent 694584 A was issued, an invention of William G. Wagner, for his “Bottle Cap.” There’s no Abstract, but the description claims that the “object of the invention is to provide an improved bottle cap for use on conventionally shaped or conventionally formed bottle mouths wherein the cap is of such design that it may be readily applied to the bottles by means of conventional bottle capping machines, the cap being advantageous in that it forms and maintains a superior seal with the bottle mouth.”
US2233904-0

Patent No. 4253878A: Light Protective Bottle Glass

patent-logo
Today in 1981, US Patent 4253878 A was issued, an invention of Robert L. Weaver and Alastair M. Jamieson, assigned to The Molson Companies Limited, for their “Light Protective Bottle Glass.” Here’s the Abstract:

A light protective bottle glass for use in beer bottles to prevent or reduce flavor deterioration by exposure to light is prepared by adding 0.065 percent by weight of nickel oxide to the Ultraviolet Absorbing Green glass usually used in green beer bottles.

US4253878-1

Patent No. 1899203A: Combined Bottle Opener And Key Ring

patent-logo
Today in 1933, US Patent 1899203 A was issued, an invention of Joseph Charle Auguste Labreche, for his “Combined Bottle Opener and Key Ring.” There’s no Abstract, but the simple description states that the “invention pertains to a novel combined bottle opener and key ring designed a to be carried conveniently-in the pocket.” Weird to think that this had to be patented, they seem so ubiquitous now.
US1899203-0