Beer In Ads #1352: Gimme Gold Label


Thursday’s ad is for Acme Beer, from 1951. This is from a series of billboard ads from the same year I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular. In this Acme ad for their Gold Label beer, they’re advertising it as a “new lighter, drier beer.” The cartoon faces are amazing, especially that wink.

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Beer In Ads #1351: From The Land Of Sky Blue Waters


Wednesday’s ad is for Hamm’s, from 1951. This is from a series of billboard ads from the same year I stumbled upon, though I’m sure the originals in color are more spectacular. In this Hamm’s ad, using their iconic tagline “From the land of sky blue waters,” imagine it ginormous, with a bottle of beer being poured into a pilsner glass, with a picturesque outdoor background.

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Beer In Ads #1349: As Good To Your Taste As It Is To Your Thirst


Monday’s ad is for Rheingold Extra Dry Lager Beer, from 1964. How about the head on that mug? One down, one to go. And only a few more peanuts left. It really is “as good to your taste as it is to your thirst.” But buried in the text is a baseball reference, too. “There’s no better way to work up a thirst than cheering our Mets. No better way to quench it than with Rheingold Extra Dry.” The World Series starts tomorrow. There may be peanut, but there will definitely be beer.

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Keep Moving For The Next Session

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For our 93rd Session, our host is Brian Devine, who writes The Roaming Pint, along with Maria Scarpello, and the pair “have been traveling around in their 29-foot RV, named Stanley, since August 2010 seeking out all kinds of great beer destinations.” For their topic, they’ve understandably chosen Beer Travel.

Since travel is such an important part of our lives I wanted our topic to focus on beer travel. In Session #29, Beer by Bart asked writers to tell them about their favorite beer trips to which they got some great responses of personal favorites and general tips for certain cities.

So as not to tread over old ground my question is going to focus on the “why” more than the “what”. So I ask you fellow bloggers and beer lovers, why is it important for us to visit the place the where our beers are made? Why does drinking from source always seem like a better and more valuable experience? Is it simply a matter of getting the beer at it’s freshest or is it more akin to pilgrimage to pay respect and understand the circumstances of the beer better?

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Not “Stanley,” but certainly a worthy steed for beer travel.

So put on your walking shoes or those boots that are made for walking, whichever you prefer with your beer. According to Brian, participation in November’s Session simply requires that you “write a response to one or more of the questions above and then post a link to the article” in the Roaming Pints’ comments section by November 6th.

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Beer In Ads #1348: Cool It With The Friendmaker


Sunday’s ad is for Reading Premium Beer, my hometown beer, from 1969. It’s an interesting package they’re selling, 16 oz. pint size bottles in a six pack, but notice they refer to them as “glass cans.” In the 1950s they adopted my favorite ad slogan of all-time: “The Friendly Beer for Modern People.” In this ad, they extend that by referring to their beer as “The Friendmaker.”

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A Love Story: Brewing Yeast & Fruit Flies

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There was an interesting story posted on Popular Science, specifically their BeerSci series. They did a great job of spinning the story as a love story, albeit an unusual one between fruit flies and brewer’s yeast, especially since the original title of the study they’re reporting on was The Fungal Aroma Gene ATF1 Promotes Dispersal of Yeast Cells through Insect Vectors. But it is, and in How Flies Are Responsible For Beer’s Tasty, Fruity Smells, they detail how,”[i]n a series of experiments, biologists from several institutes in Belgium demonstrated that brewer’s yeast makes fruity, floral smells to attract fruit flies. In the wild, yeast might live on rotting fruit and entice flies to come to them there. Yeast and flies’ relationship benefits them both, the biologists found. Previous studies have found that eating yeast helps fruit fly larva develop faster and survive better. This new study found that fruit flies help spread yeast to new environments, like a bee spreading pollen.” In effect, their study demonstrates “the co-evolution of two species.”

Here’s the summary from the original, published in Cell Reports.

Yeast cells produce various volatile metabolites that are key contributors to the pleasing fruity and flowery aroma of fermented beverages. Several of these fruity metabolites, including isoamyl acetate and ethyl acetate, are produced by a dedicated enzyme, the alcohol acetyl transferase Atf1. However, despite much research, the physiological role of acetate ester formation in yeast remains unknown. Using a combination of molecular biology, neurobiology, and behavioral tests, we demonstrate that deletion of ATF1 alters the olfactory response in the antennal lobe of fruit flies that feed on yeast cells. The flies are much less attracted to the mutant yeast cells, and this in turn results in reduced dispersal of the mutant yeast cells by the flies. Together, our results uncover the molecular details of an intriguing aroma-based communication and mutualism between microbes and their insect vectors. Similar mechanisms may exist in other microbes, including microbes on flowering plants and pathogens.

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You can also read the entire study as a pdf, but to get a sense of what it all means, read Francie Diep’s How Flies Are Responsible For Beer’s Tasty, Fruity Smells and keep in mind her warning from the outset. “Sorry, but brewer’s yeast did not evolve for you.” Perhaps not, but at least we can still reap the benefits of the relationship between those fruit flies and the yeast used to create delicious beer.

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Beer In Ads #1346: Busch Extra Dry


Friday’s ad is for Busch Extra Dry, a ginger ale that Anheuser-Busch produced, presumably during prohibition (though possibly not, there is a bottle of Budweiser inset at the bottom of the ad, but I can’t quite make out the text). With the tagline Chambertin [a French red wine] held Napoleon, when Josephine couldn’t, I”m not quite sure how that relates to a ginger ale. If it was champagne, maybe since both a very bubbly and effervescent. Still, it’s interesting to see A-B advertising a soft drink under their label.

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Beer In Ads #1345: Miller’s Mondrian


Thursday’s ad is for Miller High Life, from the 1950s. Miller did a series of these ads with sparse, minimalist decoration. In this one, it looks like the wall at the back was designed by Piet Mondrian, the Dutch modern artist. It sure looks like it’s going to be a great party, especially once someone picks up that acoustic guitar leaning against the staircase, next to some floor pillows, and starts jamming.

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