Beer In Ads #2362: Mayflower Mother’s Milk


Tuesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, the Mayflower sits in a Bay in Massachusetts, but the text of ad discusses “Mother’s Milk” and nursing mothers and how much improvement was seen after trying Pabst Malt Extract.

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Beer In Ads #2361: Had Been Sick


Monday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, a Native American was explaining to a woman that he was no longer sick thanks to the healing pwers of “Pabst Malt Extract.”

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Beer In Ads #2360: Fatigue And Weakness


Sunday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1896. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, another beautiful illustration of knights and churches with the tagline “Fatigue and Weakness” followed by “yield to the persuasive powers of Pabst Malt Extract, “The ‘Best’ Tonic.”

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Beer In Ads #2359: Hear This!!


Saturday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1896. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, with a circular gothic window containing the Pabst logo in the center, the headline is simply “Hear This!!” That’s followed by a list of all the tired feelings that you need to fix with some “spring medicine,” also known as Pabst Malt Extract.

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Beer In Ads #2358: The “Best” Tonic


Friday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, another one using the headline “A Pint of Food,” it also is comparing ancient Egypt and America’s beer. Take a close look at the two columns. On the left are scenes of brewing in Egypt, but on the right column you can see modern brewing depicted but in the style of ancient Egypt, which is actually pretty cool.

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Beer In Ads #2357: It Was A Boy….


Thursday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1895. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, another beautiful abstract illustration of imagery with barley, hops and the Pabst logo, the “It Was a Boy” text starts a testimonial story of an expecting mother who could feel stronger after drinking a bottle Pabst Malt Extract a day for several weeks, and then gave birth to a son.

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Beer In Ads #2356: Straight From The Shoulder


Wednesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1896. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, there’s a beautiful illustration of a knight holding a Pabst flag riding past a gothic cathedral. The text is poetic and all how their malt extract will make you as a strong as a knight.

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Beer In Ads #2355: A Pint Of Food


Tuesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1895. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, entitled “A Pint of Food,” Pabst extolls the virtue of their malt extract as a strength-building tonic and invoking ancient Egypt as the birthplace of beer.

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Historic Beer Birthday: Maria Best

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Today is the birthday of Maria Best (May 16, 1842-October 3, 1906). She was the daughter of Philip Best and wife of Frederick Pabst.

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The photo below was taken around 1870. Here’s its description: “Quarter-length studio portrait of Maria Best Pabst (1842-1906). She is wearing a dress with leg of mutton sleeves and ornate embroidery. The daughter of successful Milwaukee brewer Phillip Best, Maria married Captain Frederick Pabst in 1862. Together they had ten children, only five of whom survived to adulthood. Pabst went into partnership with his father-in-law in 1863 and eventually owned what would become the Pabst Brewery.”

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Frederick Pabst, before he became a brewery owner, was a steamship captain of the Huron, a Goodrich steamer on Lake Michigan. Maria Best, when she was a passenger on his ship, met the dashing Pabst and then began courting, marrying in 1862. Not long afterward, Pabst became a partner in his father-in-law’s business, the Philip Best Brewing Co.

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Beer In Ads #2173: Harry Von Zell & Bill Goodwin For Pabst


Tuesday’s ad is for Pabst Blue Ribbon, from 1950. In the later 1940s, Pabst embarked on a series of ads with celebrity endorsements, photographing star actors, athletes, musicians and other famous people in their homes, enjoying Pabst Blue Ribbon beer. This one features two celebrities, Harry Von Zell and Bill Goodwin. Von Zell “was an announcer of radio programs and an actor in films and television shows. He is best remembered for his work on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, and for once mispronouncing President Herbert Hoover’s name on the air, a slip that was exaggerated on a later comedy record album.” And Goodwin “was for many years the announcer and a recurring character of the Burns and Allen radio program, and subsequently The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show on television from 1950-1951. Upon his departure, he was replaced by Harry von Zell.”

In the ad, the pair of announcers are at a bowling alley, enjoying some beer while throwing a few games. They’re both wearing some pretty audacious bowling shirts, pretty much the only way for a 1950s man to wear any color. Harry’s taking a break and pouring himself a beer, while Bill’s about to (hopefully) knock down some pins.

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