Patent No. 4927335A: Pump For Transferring Liquids, In Particular Beer Or Carbonated Beverages

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Today in 1990, US Patent 4927335 A was issued, an invention of Carlo M. Pensa, for his “Pump For Transferring Liquids, in Particular Beer or Carbonated Beverages.” Here’s the Abstract:

The present invention relates to a pump for transferring liquids, in particular for beer or carbonated beverages, characterized in that it is constituted by two mutually opposite and integral pistons sliding inside two cylinders which generate, with their reciprocating motion, four variable-volume chambers inside two of which the fluid, through suitable valves, is alternatively intaken and delivered by a gas whose pressure is modulated by a suitable pressure regulator, in which it is the pressure of the same delivered liquid to counteract the calibration force, with said gas alternatively going to act, by means of suitable control means, inside the chamber behind the delivery chamber, so that the delivery pressure of the same liquid remains constant and predetermined, wherein said delivery pressure is obtained as the sum of the thrust of the liquid intaken from the opposite chamber, plus the modulated gas pressure, which acts on the rear face of the delivery piston.

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Our Centenary Session Searches For Lost Styles

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What a long, strange trip it’s been. The upcoming Session will be our 100th monthly outing, and our host will be Reuben Grey, who writes the Tale of the Ale. For this momentous occasion he’s sending us all on a quest to find the ark of the holy grail filled with lost beer styles, or something like that. Actually, for the June Session, the topic is “Resurrecting Lost Beer Styles,” which he describes below.

There are many [lost or almost lost beer styles] that have started to come back in to fashion in the last 10 years due to the rise of craft beer around the world.

If you have a local beer style that died out and is starting to appear again then please let the world know. Not everyone will so just write about any that you have experienced. Some of the recent style resurrections I have come across in Ireland are Kentucky Common, Grodziskie, Gose and some others. Perhaps it’s a beer you have only come across in homebrew circles and is not even made commercially.

There are no restrictions other than the beer being an obscure style you don’t find in very many places. The format, I leave up to individuals. It could be a historical analysis or just a simple beer review.

So that’s your quest: to find the holy grail of lost beer styles.

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So don your fedora, grab your tasting whip, and get cracking. To participate in the June Session, leave a comment to the original announcement, with whatever you’ve uncovered during your adventures, on or before Friday, June 5.

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Beer Birthday: Sam Calagione

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Today is Sam Calagione’s 46th birthday. Sam is the owner and marketing genius behind Delaware’s successful Dogfish Head Brewing. Sam’s also a great guy, and a (former?) rap singer of sorts, with his duo (along with his former head brewer Bryan Selders) the Pain Relievaz. See the bottom of this post for a couple videos of him singing after hours at Pike Brewery during the Craft Brewers Conference when it was held in Seattle. Join me in wishing Sam a very happy birthday.

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Sam gives the thumbs up behind his booth at the Great American Beer Festival a few years ago.

Hosts Ken Grossman & Sam Calagione
With Ken Grossman at a Life & Limb collaboration beer dinner.

Kite & Key co-owner Jim Kirk and me with Sam Calagione, Bill Covaleski & Greg Koch
Kite & Key co-owner Jim Kirk and me with Sam, Bill Covaleski & Greg Koch.

Sam Calagione @ Rare Beer Tasting
Sam at the Rare Beer Tasting at Wynkoop during GABF 2009.

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Rapping at Pike Place in Seattle in 2006.

This first video is “I Got Busy with an A-B Salesgirl,” the Pain Relievaz’ first hit single.

The second video is “West Coast Poseurs,” a smackdown to the hoppy West Coast beer and brewers.

Patent No. 3035603A: Beer Barrel Tapper

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Today in 1962, US Patent 3035603 A was issued, an invention of Walter H. Despres and Phillip D. Jamieson, for their “Beer Barrel Tapper.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

This invention relates to a new and improved beer barrel tapper, that is, a device for tapping beer kegs or barrels and has particular reference to a device of the type set forth wherein a compressed gas is introduced into the barrel or the like for removing the liquid contents, such as beer, under pressure.

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Patent No. 2792692A: Keg Cooler And Dispensing Bar Unit

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Today in 1957, US Patent 2792692 A was issued, an invention of Reed A. Bryan, for his “Keg Cooler And Dispensing Bar Unit.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

The primary object of the invention is to provide a combined keg cooling enclosure simulating a large beer barrel, dispensing bar and faucet, and auxiliary pressurizing equipment in a single unit for use at picnics, beach and boat parties, club outings and the like events.

More specifically, it is intended now to provide a keg enclosure in the form of a relatively large open-top barre]. A bar-top removably fitted over the top of the barrel so that a keg may be set down within the barrel and packed with ice, and tapping and dispensing equipment including a faucet mounted on the bar-top and a carbon dioxide cylinder mounted exteriorly of the barrel with gas connections to the top. By this arrangement there is to be provided a complete unit which may be set up iced by a distributor or dealer and delivered to the consumers in readiness for tapping and utilization without further ado.

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Patent No. 1951996A: Brewing Pan

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Today in 1934, US Patent 1951996 A was issued, an invention of Josef Schaefer, for his “Brewing Pan.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

My invention relates to improvements in brewing pans, and more particularly in the construction of the rotary liquid heater. One of the objects of the improvements is to provide a liquid heater which is simple in construction, and in which the water of condensation is readily removed from the heating coil. With this object in view my invention consists in providing the liquid heater with a single heating pipe wound into a coil having several superposed windings, each winding being preferably substantially in the form of a star. By constructing the coil from a single pipe only two openings are needed in the supply one for admitting the steam and the other for removing the water of condensation.

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Patent No. 428101A: Apparatus For Extracting Hops

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Today in 1890, US Patent 428101 A was issued, an invention of John Irlbacker, for his “Apparatus For Extracting Hops.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

My present invention has general reference to improvements in hop-extractors; and it consists in the novel and peculiar combination of parts and details of construction, as hereinafter first fully set forth and described, and then pointed out in the claims.

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Patent No. 4665940A: Container Fitting

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Today in 1987, US Patent 4665940 A was issued, an invention of Charles S. Jacobson, for his “Container Fitting.” Here’s the Abstract:

A fitting for a container of draft beer or the like includes a first valve for permitting pressurized gas to be injected into the container and a second valve for permitting beer to be dispensed from the container. Both valves are urged to their closed positions by inexpensive elastomeric springs which also serve to hold certain components of the fitting in assembled relation. A coupler attaches the fitting to the container and enables the container to be used with Sankey-type taps.

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Patent No. WO1988003556A1: Preparation Of Wort Extracts

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Today in 1988, US Patent WO 1988003556 A1 was issued, an invention of Joseph L. Owades, for his “Preparation Of Wort Extracts.” Joe is most well-known for having invented low-calorie light beer. Here’s the Abstract:

A method for producing a wort containing a reduced level of fermentable sugars. In a preferred embodiment the method consists of providing a warm aqueous suspension of ground malt, and adding the warm suspension to a boiling aqueous suspension of cereal adjuncts. The resulting wort is useful for producing a beer with a lower-than-normal alcohol content, or a malt beverage lacking sweetness usually associated with malt beverages.

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Patent No. 452609A: Beer-Pump

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Today in 1891, US Patent 452609 A was issued, an invention of James C. Magee, for his “Beer-Pump.” There’s no Abstract, though it’s described this way in the application:

My invention relates to an improvement in a tap or pump for beer, &e., the same having a plug which may be inserted in a keg, barrel, &c., and a tube adjustably fitted in such plug, an air-space existing between said tube and plug, so that the beer or fluid may be subjected to pressure, the tube being connected with a discharge-pipe.

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