Beer In Ads #2363: The First Inauguration


Wednesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, using the inauguration of George Washington as our first president under the new constitution, Pabst argues that using their Malt Extract will keep you from dyspepsia and indigestion, especially if you are “a brain worker.”

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Beer In Ads #2362: Mayflower Mother’s Milk


Tuesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, the Mayflower sits in a Bay in Massachusetts, but the text of ad discusses “Mother’s Milk” and nursing mothers and how much improvement was seen after trying Pabst Malt Extract.

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Beer In Ads #2361: Had Been Sick


Monday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, a Native American was explaining to a woman that he was no longer sick thanks to the healing pwers of “Pabst Malt Extract.”

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Beer In Ads #2360: Fatigue And Weakness


Sunday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1896. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, another beautiful illustration of knights and churches with the tagline “Fatigue and Weakness” followed by “yield to the persuasive powers of Pabst Malt Extract, “The ‘Best’ Tonic.”

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Beer In Ads #2359: Hear This!!


Saturday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1896. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, with a circular gothic window containing the Pabst logo in the center, the headline is simply “Hear This!!” That’s followed by a list of all the tired feelings that you need to fix with some “spring medicine,” also known as Pabst Malt Extract.

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Beer In Ads #2358: The “Best” Tonic


Friday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1897. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, another one using the headline “A Pint of Food,” it also is comparing ancient Egypt and America’s beer. Take a close look at the two columns. On the left are scenes of brewing in Egypt, but on the right column you can see modern brewing depicted but in the style of ancient Egypt, which is actually pretty cool.

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Beer In Ads #2357: It Was A Boy….


Thursday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1895. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, another beautiful abstract illustration of imagery with barley, hops and the Pabst logo, the “It Was a Boy” text starts a testimonial story of an expecting mother who could feel stronger after drinking a bottle Pabst Malt Extract a day for several weeks, and then gave birth to a son.

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Beer In Ads #2356: Straight From The Shoulder


Wednesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1896. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, there’s a beautiful illustration of a knight holding a Pabst flag riding past a gothic cathedral. The text is poetic and all how their malt extract will make you as a strong as a knight.

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Beer In Ads #2355: A Pint Of Food


Tuesday’s ad is from Pabst, from 1895. Many brewers made other related products besides beer, notably malt extract, to be used primarily in cooking as an ingredient in breads and desserts and even as a tonic. According to Briess, which still offers it today. “What is Malt Extract? Malt can be further processed to produce liquid or dried sweeteners called Malt Extracts.” They were essentially “the original starch- or grain-based sweetener.” Many brewers survived prohibition making malt extract, both for legal uses and for homebrewing, but Pabst was making and advertising decades before. In this ad, entitled “A Pint of Food,” Pabst extolls the virtue of their malt extract as a strength-building tonic and invoking ancient Egypt as the birthplace of beer.

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Beer In Ads #2354: Thanksgiving Dinner


Monday’s ad is by the Brewing Industry Foundation, from 1945, part of a series of ads the beer industry undertook just as World War 2 was ending, after their “Morale is a Lot of Little Things” series. They were also a precursor to the “Home Life in America” series that was numbered (and which I’ve featured before), and very similar. Each ad featured an original illustration or work of art by prominent artists of the time, along with the first use of the “Beer Belongs…enjoy it!” tagline. It’s also when the UBIF started using “America’s Beverage of Moderation” in their advertising.

In this ad, entitled “Thanksgiving Dinner,” the scene shows the start of a family’s Thanksgiving dinner, with the turkey and all the fixin’s, including beer. The painting was done by Andrée Rouellan, who was an “American artist whose realist work has modernist overtones and commonly depicts everyday scenes in American South and New York City” from New York.

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