Patent No. 4530631A: Pull Tab For Easy Open Can End — Method Of Manufacture Thereof

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Today in 1985, US Patent 4530631 A was issued, an invention of Elton G. Kaminski and Carl F. McEldowney, assigned to The Stolle Corporation, for their “Pull Tab For Easy Open Can End — Method Of Manufacture Thereof.” Here’s the Abstract:

An easy open can end having a retained tear strip extending diametrically partly across the can end defined by a score line, and a graspable pull tab adjacent and outside the open end of the score line. The pull tab is provided with a nose portion to initiate a tear along the score line upon lifting of the pull tab. The edges of the nose portion are curled into a cylindrical cross-sectional shape to provide a high beam strength and to rigidize the nose portion and to prevent failure by bending before the tear strip is opened. A method for manufacture of the pull tab includes forming at least one relief notch in the peripheral edge of the pull tab blank at the nose end thereof, whereby to relieve compressive forces when the edge is curled, and curling the peripheral edge of the nose portion in successive steps to form an edge portion of continuous cylindrical cross-sectional shape.

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Patent No. 2844299A: Beverage Cooler Carton

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Today in 1958, US Patent 2844299 A was issued, an invention of Theodore F. Hauf and David E. Kessler, assigned to the Pabst Brewing Co., for their “Beverage Cooler Carton.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to packages comprising a carton having a number of containers, such as beer cans or the like, packed therein, and the invention refers more particularly to a package of that type which is adapted to be packed with ice for cooling the contents of the containers.

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Patent No. 2324312A: Bottle Feeding Mechanism

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Today in 1943, US Patent 2324312 A was issued, an invention of George J. Meyer Jr., Charles Steckling, and Joseph F. Classen, for their “Bottle Feeding Mechanism.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The present invention relates to feeding mechanism adapted for use in connection with bottle handllng machines, such as cappers, fillers and labelers, although the invention is also applicable to the feeding of cans and other articles.

A bottle-handling machine, such as a capper, is commonly provided with a traveling carrier having means for holding the upstanding bottles in spaced relation to present the bottles successively to the operation of the machine. It is also common practice to provide the machine with a conveyer for conducting the bottles to the carrier, the successive bottles on the conveyer being usually in abutting or closely spaced relation. The spacing of the bottles on the carrier is ordinarily somewhat greater than the bottle diameter and because of this and other factors it is necessary to provide some means for controlling the feed of the bottles to the carrier, so as to suit the bottle spacing or bottle pitch of the carrier. Various mechanisms have heretofore been devised for this purpose, but they have been open to certain objections, such as relatively complicated construction and excessive rubbing and agitation of the bottles.

It is an object of the invention to provide an improved form of feeding mechanism which will effect the safe and accurate transfer of bottles to the traveling carrier of a capping machine or other bottle-handling machine, which will minimize rubbing or marking of the outer walls of the bottles, which will reduce agitation or jostling of the bottles, which is adapted for high-speed operation, which will accommodate bottles of different diameter, and which is capable of inexpensive manufacture and easy mounting.

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Patent No. 2006450A: Capping Machine

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Today in 1935, US Patent 2006450 A was issued, an invention of John J. Gaynor, for his “Capping Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to capping machines, or more particularly to bottle crowners of the double head type.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide such a machine of the simplest construction with a minimum number of actuating parts so as to promote compactness, and at the same time insuring reliability and effectiveness in operation; and whereby the caps as applied to containers by both capping heads will be uniform.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a capping machine that can be closely arranged in cooperative relation with the container conveying means of a rotary type container filling machine, so that the containers will be capped shortly after being transferred to the capping heads of the capping machine alternately. The type of filling machine referred to includes a circular rotating container conveyor having peripherally arranged vertically reciprocal container supports in which the containers are placed to be raised into filling heads which depend from the circular liquid supply tanks placed above the conveyor and connected to rotate therewith. As a rule the tank is of greater diameter than the conveyor, which relation of parts presents the problem in arranging the capping mechanism in close cooperative relation with the conveyor.

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Patent No. D92640S: Design For A Beer Bottle

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Today in 1934, US Patent D92640 S was issued, an invention of Harry Ennever, for his “Design for a Beer Bottle.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description this the entirety of what is claimed:

I invented a new, original, and ornamental Design for a Beer Bottle, of which the following is a description. The ornamental design for a beer bottle, reference being had to the [sic] substantially as shown in the accompanying drawing.

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Patent No. 4275097A: Protective Coating For Cans And Methods For Application Of Coating Thereto

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Today in 1981, US Patent 4275097 A was issued, an invention of Frank L. Shriver, assigned to the Coors Container Company, for his “Protective Coating for Cans and Methods for Application of Coating Thereto.” Here’s the Abstract:

Apparatus and methods of applying a thin narrow width coating to can body members comprising a feed control means associated with a guideway means for causing rotating moving of the can body members across an elongated coating applicator roller member extending parallel to the path of movement of the can body members, the rotation of and spacing of the can body members and the rotation of the applicator roller member being controlled to apply the coating during substantially only one revolution of the can body member and less than one revolution of the roller member.




Odds & Ends For The Next Session

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For 101st Session, our host will be Jack Perdue, who writes Deep Beer. For his topic, he’s asking us to look beyond what’s in the bottle, and to the bottle itself, along with the crown, the label, the carrier, the mother carton and all of the odds and ends, or detritus, that go into the beer’s packaging, or as he explains what he has in mind for the July Session, the “Bottles, Caps and Other Beer Detritus,” which he describes below.

There are many great creative people involved in the beer industry: the brewers designing and creating the stuff of our attention, marketers bringing the product to market, graphic artists making the products attractive and informative and writers who tell the story of beer. The list goes on. And thus, many great products, that may or may not get your attention. The focus is on the liquid inside the bottle, can or keg, and rightly so. What about all the other products necessary to bring that beer to you? What about the things that are necessary but are easily overlooked and discarded. This months theme is, “Bottles, Caps and Other Beer Detritus”.

Detritus, according to one definition in the Merriam Webster Dictionary is “miscellaneous remnants : odds and ends”. While the number and quality of our beer choices has certainly improved over the recent decade, have you paid any attention to the rest of the package. Those things we normally glance over and throw away when we have poured and finished our beer. These are sometimes works of art in themselves. Bottle caps, labels, six-pack holders, even the curvature of the bottle. For this month’s The Session theme, I’m asking contributors to share their thoughts on these things, the tangential items to our obsession. Do you have any special fetish with bottle caps, know of someone that is doing creative things with packaging, have a beer bottle or coaster collection.

So drink the beer, but then think about what’s left over when it’s gone.

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Let us know about the bits and pieces from your point of view. To participate in the July Session, leave a comment to the original announcement, with , on or before Friday, July 3.

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Patent No. 3889725A: Method Of Filling Beer Cans

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Today in 1975, US Patent 3889725 A was issued, an invention of Werner Heckmann, Heinz Jordan, Uwe Knabe, Karl Plock, Karl Quest, Friedrich Rademacher, and Dieter Unger, assigned to Holstein & Kappert Maschf, for their “Method of Filling Beer Cans or the Like.” Here’s the Abstract:

The supported devices in an apparatus which fills beer cans orbit about a vertical axis and have upright housings supporting cylindrical centering members which carry deformable gaskets for the mouths of cans. Such cans are supported by a conveyor which orbits with the filling devices and is movable up and down or is held against vertical movement during rotation with the filling devices. The introduction of liquid into the cans takes place subsequent to introduction of a compressed gas, and such gas can be used to bias the gaskets against the mouths of cans during filling. When the filling of a can is completed, the pressure in its interior is increased to facilitate separation from the respective gasket. That supply of beer which remains in a channel of the housing on closing of the beer-admitting valve can be expelled in response to expansion of gas in a chamber which receives such gas by way of the container and is sealed from the container by beer in the channel. The expansion of gas in the chamber takes place in response to opening of a valve which reduces the pressure of gas above the body of liquid in the container.

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Patent No. 4838419A: Keg Board

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Today in 1989, US Patent 4838419 A was issued, an invention of Ferdinand Weits, William F. Mekelburg and Marc R. Latour, assigned to the Adolph Coors Company, for their “Keg Board.” Here’s the Abstract:

A keg board for use in stacking beer kegs and the like in an upright orientation during storage and transporation of the kegs comprising: a generally planar surface for engaging and supporting a generally planar end surface of each keg; and pockets operatively associated with the planar surface for limiting relative lateral shifting movement of the kegs such as caused by shocks and vibration associated with transporting of the kegs.

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Patent No. 856400A: Bottle-Seal

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Today in 1907, US Patent 856400 A was issued, an invention of King C. Gillette, for his “Bottle-Seal.” And yes, that’s the same King Gillette who invented the safety razor. There’s no Abstract, although in the description it states that his “invention relates to bottle seals, especially to that class of devices used to close bottles, or vessels containing beer, mineral water, and the like where a cheap seal is desired; and the object of this invention is to provide a seal that will be cheap to manufacture and efficient in use.”

It is the object of the present invention to provide a seal so constructed that rubber can be used instead of cork, and at the same time provide means. to prevent the contents of the bottle coming in contact with the rubber; a further object being to provide a device wherein but a very small sealing ring is required and at the same time provide means to hold this ring in place in the cap while being transported from the factory to the consumer, and while applying the stopper to a bottle.

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