Patent No. 607770A: Apparatus For Pasteurizing Beer

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Today in 1898, US Patent 607770 A was issued, an invention of William J. Ruff, for his “Apparatus For Pasteurizing Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

My invention has for its object an improved apparatus to be utilized in pasteurizing beer, whereby the operation is more perfectly carried out and the beer more effectually and uniformly treated and its chemical properties preserved.

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Patent No. 2354092A: Art Of Brewing Beer, Ale, Or Near-Beer

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Today in 1944, US Patent 2354092 A was issued, an invention of Berthold Stein, for his “Art Of Brewing Beer, Ale, Or Near-Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

The present invention includes both the process of brewing as hereinafter described, and the beverage or resulting product thereof, and when referring to beer it is intended to include ale and near-beer, and analogous beverages of the same class Beer as well as ale is generally described as a fermented malt liquor with an average percentage of alcohol of from three to four per cent. by weight, or sometimes less, as in near beer, which may have about one-half per cent. It has a mildly bitter and aromatic flavor and odor. The brewers have. always attempted to give the beer an aromatic hop flavor and odor. Up to date, they have not succeeded in doing so. The bitter and so-called aromatic flavor is to be derived from. the hops. which are used in the brewing process. While all kinds of beer and` ales taste more or less bitter, there are no beers brewed which really have an aromatic hop flavor and odor. This is due to the processes and apparatuses which are employed in the brewing of beer and ale. All beers and ales have a more or less pronounced bitter taste, and they often have a disagreeable taste and odor as well. The latter is derived principally from the cellulose matter of the husks of the grain, and the fatty oils contained in the grain, such as barley, corn or rice. These bitter tastes and disagreeable odors are the principal reasons why so many people do not drink beer. It is generally understood that beer and ale is made from malt, and hops. In this country, however, beer and ale is brewed mostly from a mixture of barley malt (about 70%), and cereals unmalted (about 30%), namely, corn, rice, corn. Syrups or sugars, and hops. The hops in the brewing of beer and ales are used as a spice or condiment with a view to overcoming the above-mentioned bad taste and odor.

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Historic Beer Birthday: Josef Sedlmayr

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Today is the birthday of Josef Sedlmayr (July 18, 1808-March 12, 1886). He was the son of Gabriel Sedlmayr, who owned Spaten brewery, and Josef owned the Franziskaner brewery, though the two breweries later merged.

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Joseph Sedlmayr in 1861

Here’s a very short biography on Find a Grave:

Owner of the Franziskaner Brewery in Munich, which was established near the Franciscan Monastery in Munich in 1363. Up to and during Sedlmayr’s time it was known as the Franziskaner-Leistbrauerei.

According to Spaten’s website (which owns Franziskaner today)

At the same time, one of the sons of Gabriel Sedlmayr – Joseph, was the owner of the brewery Leist (Leistbrauerei), which dates back to the fifteenth century.

In 1858, he bought shares in the Franziskaner brewery, and from 1861 Joseph Sedlmayr becomes its sole owner.

In 1865, the entire production of the brewery Leist is transferred to the Franziskaner-Brauerei.

At Oktoberfest in 1872 becomes presented a new beer with an amber colour, which gave rise a new style known since then as Marzenbier.

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And here’s a timeline from the Sheehan Family Companies website:

  • 1363 – Franziskaner’s roots can be traced back to 1363. It was in this year that the brewer Seidel Vaterstetter is first mentioned as the owner of the ‘brewery next to the Franciscans’ in the Munich Residenzstrasse. The name ‘Franziskaner’ derives from the Franciscan monastery diagonally across the street.
  • 1841 – The Franziskaner Brewery moves to Lilienberg in Munich’s eastern suburb of Au. In the same year Augustin Deiglmayr, a son-in-law of Spaten’s owner Gabriel Sedlmayr the Elder, buys the Residenzstrasse brewery.
  • 1861 – Joseph Sedlmayr, owner of the Leist Brewery (probably founded in the 15th century) and son of Spaten’s Gabriel Sedlmayr the Elder, buys out August Deiglmayr, with whom he has been co-running the Residenzstrasse brewery since 1858.
  • 1865 – The Leist Brewery in Sendlinger Strasse stops its brewing operations, which are now left entirely to the Franziskaner Brewery.
  • 1872 – ‘Ur-Märzen’, the amber-colored Oktoberfest beer from Franziskaner-Leist, is served for the first time at the Schottenhamel Tent on the Oktoberfest fairgrounds. Brewed from a Viennese recipe, this golden-yellow beer is stronger than the summer beer.
  • 1909 – Gabriel Sedlmayr III, the son of Joseph Sedlmayr, turns the Franziskaner-Leist Brewery into a family-owned joint stock company, the ‘Joseph Sedlmayr Zum Franziskanerkeller (Leistbräu) AG’.
  • 1922 – The Franziskaner-Leist Brewery and the Spaten Brewery, likewise owned by the Sedlmayr family, unite to form a single joint stock company, the ‘Gabriel und Joseph Sedlmayr Spaten-Franziskaner-Leistbräu AG’, in order to combat the economic problems of the crisis-ridden postwar years and to capitalize on synergies.
  • 1935 – The Munich artist Ludwig Hohlwein designs the company’s distinctive trademark, which is still used today. The Franciscan Friar continues to stand for the unsurpassed quality of Franziskaner’s premium weiss beer.

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Curiously, the iconic Franziskaner image of the monk that’s used on their labels was only created in 1935

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Patent No. 1190841A: Beer Strainer

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Today in 1915, US Patent 1190841 A was issued, an invention of Alexander Almasy and Joseph Bacha, for their “Beer Strainer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to beer strainers.

The object of the invention resides in the provision of a device of the character named adapted to be incorporated in a beer dispensing system between the supply and the dispensing faucet for the purpose of separating all solid impurities from the beer and trapping same.

A further object of the invention resides in the provision of a beer strainer embodying an improved construction whereby same may be easily cleaned by separating the component parts thereof.

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Patent No. 385986A: Beer Cooler

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Today in 1888, US Patent 385986 A was issued, an invention of Alois Aufrichtig, for his “Beer Cooler.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

I have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Beer-Coolers. The improvement consists in such construction that either one or more of the pipes or elbows may be removed, and, in combination with such construction, a flanged elbow having parts of different lengths, so that one of the flanges may be in line with the sectional post and the other outside such line.

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Patent No. 1031838A: Beer Saving Apparatus

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Today in 1912, US Patent 1031838 A was issued, an invention of Beer Saving Apparatus, for his “Beer Saving Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Having thus fully described” my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: in combination, beer tank, a beer faucet provided with a controlling valve, a pipe leading from said tank to said faucet, a pressure tank, connections between said pressure tank and said beer tank, a pan beneath the aforesaid faucet, a trap beneath said pan, a drainpipe leading from said pan to said trap, a pipe leading from said pressure tank to said trap, a branch pipe lead pipe leading from said tank to said faucet, a pressure’ tank, connections between said pressure tank and said beer tank, a pan beneath the aforesaid faucet, a trap beneath said pan a drain pipe leading from said pan to said trap, a pipe leading from said pressure tank to said trap, a drainage .pipe leading from said trap to’ the first named pipe, a valve for controlling the passage through said branch pipe, a valve or controlling the passages through said drain the pipe leading from the. pressure tank to the trap, ‘a link connected pipe and through to said valves, an operating lever for the controlling valve of the aforesaid faucet, and connections between said lever and said link. In combination, a beer tank, a’beer faucet provided with a controlling valve, a pipe leading from said tank to said faucet a pressure tank, connections between said pressure tank and said beer tank, a pan beneath the aforesaid faucet,a trap beneath said pan, a drain pipe leading from said pan to said trap, a pipe leading from said pressure tank to said trap, a branch pipe leading from said trap to the first named r p through said branch pipe, trolling the passages through said drain pipe and through pressure tank to the trap, means for automatically operating said valves as the controlling valve of the faucet is operated, and a jet pipe connected to said trap and adapt a valve for coned to deliver a sweeping jet into the afore said pan

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Patent No. 345059A: Apparatus For Cooling Beer

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Today in 1886, US Patent 345059 A was issued, an invention of Henry C. Johnson, for his “Apparatus For Cooling Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of the invention is to produce a beer-cooler that will operate upon a large body of liquid without the necessity of exposing it to evaporation in large shallow pans. To this end I employ a tub, covered to preserve the richness and flavor of the beer and prevent its contamination, and having one or preferably two or more coils of pipe or conduits of any preferred form connected with separate receivers or holders for the ammonia, which is allowed to expand in said pipes with any necessary rapidity of flow, regulated accurately by a valve, and is conducted to a receiving-tank common to all the coils, in which the ammonia is taken up by water for future use. When more convenient, carbonic acid, refrigerated brine, or other well-known cooling medium may be used in the conduit, instead of expanding the ammonia therein. The beer, after it is cooled, may be charged with carbonic-acid gas either in the same vessel orin separate storage-tuns to which it maybe transferred from the cooler, the carbonic acid gas serving to hasten the separation of the yeast and to rapidly bring the beer to a ripened condition, and the yeast being allowed to flow off to a separate vessel preferably without exposing the beer to the atmosphere.

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Patent No. 996972A: Apparatus For Filling Bottles

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Today in 1911, US Patent 996972 A was issued, an invention of Frank L. Caris and Clarence J. Gardner, for their “Apparatus For Filling Bottles.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to apparatus for use in filling bottles from kegs or barrels, the same being particularly adapted for bottling beer and the like.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide an inexpensive device of this character which can be readily handled by one person, there being improved means for discharging the liquid into the bottle and for permitting the escape of foam back to the keg or other receptacle from which the liquid is drawn.

A further object is to provide apparatus of this type having a nozzle in which is mounted a valve normally maintained in closed position but which can be conveniently held open during the filling operation. With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention consists in the combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of invention herein disclosed can be made within the scope of what is claimed, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

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Patent No. 280385A: Apparatus For And Process Of Cooling And Condensing The Foam Which Forms On The Surface Of Fermenting Liquor

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Today in 1883, US Patent 280385 A was issued, an invention of Clement A. Maus, for his “Apparatus For and Process of Cooling and Condensing the Foam Which Forms on the Surface of Fermenting Liquor.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to an apparatus for cooling and condensing the foam of fermenting liquors, wort, beer, ale, &c, in which a condensing-chamber operates in conjunction with suitable pipes, a current of cooled and purified air from an ice-reservoir, and a vessel containing the fermenting liquid; and the objects of my invention are, first, to provide a means for condensing the foam that is forming on the surface of fermenting wort, beer, ale, &c., by blowing on or beating it with a current of cooled air, thus converting the foam into a liquid state again and permitting it to run back into the fermenting body of liquid; second, to provide facilities for counteracting the volatilization of the flavor and fine hop aroma of the wort, beer, ale, &c., while undergoing several stages of fermentation; third, to provide a means for preventing the escape of the volatile portion of the hop aroma and flavor of the fermenting wort, beer, ale, 850., during the first and last stages of the fermenting body. These objects I accomplish by the mechanism illustrated by the accompanying drawing, in which the entire apparatus is illustrated by a single figure, which is partially in section to show the construction and arrangement of certain parts more fully.

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Patent No. 431246A: Mash Machine

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Today in 1890, US Patent 431246 A was issued, an invention of Andrew W. Billings, for his “Mash Machine.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to certain improvements in the apparatus for and method of manufacturing beer set forth in Letters Patent No. 324,523, granted to me August 18, 1885; and my invention consists in combining and heating the materials forming what I term the supplemental mash, which consists of raw grain and malt mixed in proper proportions and under conditions as set forth in said patent, as fully set forth hereinafter, so as to adapt the operation to the character of the material acted upon and reduce the length of time required in making the supplemental mash, and also in certain improvements in the apparatus. In this class of apparatus, as ordinarily constructed, the stirrer blades are immovably fixed in position, or are so arranged and fitted for the one kind of mash to be made that they cannot be used for anything else than for an ordinary mash, nor can they be changed in any manner, and they fail to so agitate the mass as to maintain all parts at the same temperature and in the same condition. In the apparatus as constructed by me the blades are easily and readily changed as to number, position on the arms, their angle to the arms and each other without any danger of their working loose while in motion, thus enabling me to make either a very thick or thin mash and successfully operate with any kind of grain (malted or unmalted) or starch, maintain all parts in the same condition, obtain the largest possible percentage of extract, and to use a very much larger percentage of the raw grain.

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