Patent No. 3774820A: Tapping Device For Beer Kegs

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Today in 1973, US Patent 3774820 A was issued, an invention of Homer R. Zucconi, for his “Tapping Device For Beer Kegs.” Here’s the Abstract:

Beer tapping attachments comprising a permanent keg unit including two normally closed spring-biased one-way valves to which unit is detachably secured a valve body which also includes two registering spring biased one-way valves, one connected to a source of air under pressure and the other to a beer spigot. All four valves are yieldably opened when the valve body is connected to the keg unit.

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Patent No. 289075A: Device For Tapping Beer And Other Barrel

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Today in 1883, US Patent 289075 A was issued, an invention of John F. Davey, for his “Device for Tapping Beer and Other Barrel.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

My invention relates to certain improvements in faucets for barrels or casks containing beer or other liquid under pressure,’and also in the bushing which is applied to the head of the barrel and used in connection with said faucet; and my invention consists in the combination,with a bushing having an exterior screwthread and a perfectly-smooth interior from end to end, and adapted to contain a plug driven tightly therein, of a faucet provided with a rearwardly-extending threaded stem or portion, over which is screwed a coup ling-nut having a second interior thread at its inner end, whereby it is adapted to screw over the outside of the end of the bushing in the barrel-head, and thus hold the faucet in place while the latter is being screwed in to force the wooden plug through the bushing, the coupling nut having a screw-thread on the outside of its front end, over which is fitted a screw-cap provided with a packing, thus form- .in g a stuffing-box at this point to prevent lead age, which enables the faucet to be always be tight when the discharge-outlet is turned in the desired position for use, which would not always be the case if it were turned up against a shoulder.

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Patent No. WO1999060090A1: Premix Composition For Clarifying Beer

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Today in 1999, US Patent WO 1999060090 A1 was issued, an invention of Mustafa Rehmanji, Andrew Mola, Robert Ianniello, Kolazi S. Narayanan, and Tom Cheng, assigned to Isp Investments Inc., for their “Premix Composition For Clarifying Beer.” Here’s the Abstract:

A premix composition for clarifying beverages like beer includes, by weight, (a) about 40 to 90 %, preferably 60-85 %, of silica xerogel having less than 10 % water therein, preferably 5 % or less, and a particle size, as defined by its mean volume average diameter MV, in both the dry state and as a 10 % aqueous slurry, of less than 50 ν, preferably about 5-30 ν, and (b) about 10 to 60 %, preferably 15-40 %, of crosslinked polyvinylpyrrolidone having a particle size as defined, in the dry state, of about 10 to 50 ν, and about 30-60 ν in a 10 % aqueous slurry, and a process of obtaining, chill-haze stabilized beer with substantial reduction in high molecular weight proteins, as well as polyphenols, flavanoids and tannins, in an efficient and effective single-step process at a rapid filter-flow rate, with undetectable residual soluble polyvinylpyrrolidone thereafter, and no microbiological growth in the premix, effective haze stability after time, and advantageous redispersibility of the premix used in the process.

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Patent No. 6820775B2: Gas-Pressurized Beverage Keg

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Today in 1966, US Patent 6820775 B2 was issued, an invention of Klaus Meike and Hans Helmut Reichmann, assigned to Schafer Werke Gmbh, for their Electric “Gas-Pressurized Beverage Keg.” Here’s the Abstract:

A beverage container has a cylindrical lower side wall and floor defining a lower beverage chamber and centered on an axis, a cylindrical upper side wall and upper wall centered on the axis and defining an upper pressurized-gas chamber, and an annular partition having an outer edge welded to an upper edge of the lower side wall and a lower edge of the upper side wall and a center part closely juxtaposed with the upper wall of the upper chamber. A tap assembly mounted on the upper-chamber upper wall has a riser tube projecting through the partition center part into a lower region of the lower chamber. An upper protective ring is fitted to the upper part and to the valve assembly and a lower protective ring is fitted to the lower part. The rings and side walls have the same diameters.

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Patent No. 3286385A: Electric Beer Tap Handle

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Today in 1966, US Patent 3286385 A was issued, an invention of Charles G. Tate Jr., for his Electric “Beer Tap Handle.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a beer tarp handle with an electrically operated display device.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a beer tap handle with a movable display device that is electrically driven.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an electrically powered beer tap handle that can readily be converted from a rotating to an oscillating display device or to a stationery light.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a beer tap handle that is simple in construction and easy and economical to manufacture and assemble.

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Patent No. 486485A: Pressure Regulator

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Today in 1892, US Patent 486485 A was issued, an invention of Joseph Lehr and Joseph Bodani, for their “Pressure Regulator.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

Our present invention has for its objects to provide a device adapted to maintain an even pressure of air, gas, or other fluid in a chamber or receptacle supplied from a suitable source, which pressure is capable of easy regulation, and though it is especially adapted for maintaining an even and regular pressure on the beer in a keg from which it is being drawn said device is obviously capable of use in other connections and for other purposes; and to these ends it consists in certain improvements in construction and combinations of parts, all as will be hereinafter fully described, and the novel features pointed out particularly in the claims at the end of this specification.

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Patent No. 775780A: Art Of Brewing

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Today in 1904, US Patent 775780 A was issued, an invention of Joseph Schneible, for his “Art Of Brewing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

This invention relates particularly to the preparation of beer-wort, and has for its object to make-it possible to produce with certainty a wort of definite character, with reference particularly to the relationship between sugar and non-sugar, maltodextrins and dextrin, etc.

According to the methods of brewing now practiced the production of a wort of a definite or the best character in so far as it is dependent upon the relative amounts present in it of the different starch derivatives is practically impossible. This is largely due to the fact that the malt mash is subjected for a time long enough to permit conversion of the starch to take place to varying temperatures without so controlling the temperatures as to obtain the different starch derivatives in the desired proportions. This variation of temperature necessarily results from delivering, as is the customary practice, the cooked unmalted cereal mash or other heating medium,”such as hot water, which in some systems of brewing is used to raise the temperature of the malt mash, at substantially the boiling temperature to the mash-tub, which already contains the peptonized malt mash, which is at a temperature much below the boiling-point. The stream of boiling-hot cooked mash raises the temperature of the adjacent portions of the malt mash to a heat approximating its own temperature,which unduly elevated temperature continues long enough for conversion of the starch obviously where the hot cereal to begin. mash or other heating medium is thus introduced into the malt mash it is not only impossible to regulate the temperature to which portions of the malt mash are thus raised, but it is also impossible to regulate the quantity of the malt mash which has its temperature thus unduly raised, and the degree and extent Serial No. 186,592. (No specimens) of conversion or saccharification is therefore impossible of regulation under such methods.

According to the present invention the temperature of the peptonized malt mash is raised to the proper converting degree by the heat of the cooked unmalted cereal mash or other heating medium; but the attainment of the desired temperature .,is effected in so short a space of time that no reaction at other temperatures will take place, the contact of the malt mash at the peptonizing temperature with the substantially boiling hot cooked mash or other heating medium being only momentary, or rather the thorough mixture of the two being so quickly effected that no undesired reaction takes place. The contact or mingling of the malt mash and cooked mash or other heating medium preferably takes place as the two mashes or the malt mash and heating medium are moving on together in a comparatively small stream, and no portion of the malt mash remains in contact for any appreciable length of time with the cooked mash or other heating medium while the latter is at boiling temperature. In other words, the malt mash is raised to the desired converting temperature without subjecting the malt mash to reaction at any temperature other than that which is predetermined.

It will be obvious that the invention can be practiced in different ways and with different forms of apparatus, the most convenient and practicable mode of practicing the invention being to thoroughly mingle the malt mash and the hot cooked mash or other heating medium while in movement from the respective tanks or sources of supply tothe common mash-tub or strainer-tub, so that the desired converting temperature is attained at once in the commingled mashes or commingled malt mash and heating medium. After being so mingled the combined liquor is allowed to stand for the usual period of time required for conversion.

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Patent No. 2180828A: Beer Return Device

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Today in 1939, US Patent 2180828 A was issued, an invention of Charles Horansky and Frank J. Suchanek, for their “Beer Return Device.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

This form of device is intended for use with kegs or barrels containing dry contents and to accommodate barrels or kegs containing liquids. The turn-rod 28 is supplied with an inner disk, as shown by Fig. 7, which is secured to the head of said barrel or keg. In Fig. 8 a further modification is shown, and consists of a series of arms 32 on the turn-rod 28 and having outer angular ends in which set-screws 327 are mounted and adapted to take over the end of a barrel or keg and the set-screws caused to engage the body of said barrel or keg ahead of an end hoop, and there by provide a means of securement. The last device set forth can be used alone or in combination with the other devices. Of course the barrel or keg is permitted by all the devices to have a free rotatable movement, which is Very desirable. When the said holding arm 26 is arranged against the end of a barrel or keg, the flat links 24 are positioned as shown in Fig.2, the joints of said links being so constructed as to prevent them from being thrown forward beyond a predetermined point and the rearmost link from being depressed below the horizontal plane of the next link to which it is attached.

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Patent Nos. 805305A & 805306A: Air Filter

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Today in 1905, both US Patent 805305 A and US Patent 805306 A were issued, and both are related inventions of Albert Lieber, under the same name: “Air Filter.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims for the first one:

The object of this invention is to provide an improved construction of air-filter for filtering compressed air and removing from it impurities as well as chemically treating it during its passage through the filter.

The use to which I. have put this filter is for pitching the interior of beer-kegs and the like for blowing and spreading the warm pitch upon the internal surface of a keg by compressed air passing through this filter. In such case the bacteria and germs in the air will be embedded in the pitch and thus affect the beer, impairing its preserving qualities as well as its taste. It is therefore found very important by me that the compressed air used for the purpose mentioned be rendered chemically pure by passing the air through medicated cotton, thus arresting the particles of dust, microbes, germs, and the like. Beer-kegs treated in this way can be used immediately after being pitched and after prior use without the necessity of treating the kegs as heretofore.

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And here’s a description of the claims for the second patent:

The chief feature of this invention consists of means for compressing the cotton or filtering material to the degree best suited for the chemical through which the air passed through the device is being treated.

The purpose of the invention, therefore, is to more thoroughly arrest the bacteria and germs of the air in the filter before the same passes through the filter. I have used it for pitching the interior of beer-kegs, the air being passed through the filter and compressed for blowing and spreading warm pitch upon the internal surface of the keg. This device prevents the bacteria and germs from the air entering the pitch.

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Patent No. 637738A: Device For Handling Beer Barrels

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Today in 1899, US Patent 637738 A was issued, an invention of Jacob Elmer Ludwig, for his “Device For Handling Beer Barrels.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes these claims:

This form of device is intended for use with kegs or barrels containing dry contents and to accommodate barrels or kegs containing liquids. The turn-rod 28 is supplied with an inner disk, as shown by Fig. 7, which is secured to the head of said barrel or keg. In Fig. 8 a further modification is shown, and consists of a series of arms 32 on the turn-rod 28 and having outer angular ends in which set-screws 327 are mounted and adapted to take over the end of a barrel or keg and the set-screws caused to engage the body of said barrel or keg ahead of an end hoop, and there by provide a means of securement. The last device set forth can be used alone or in combination with the other devices. Of course the barrel or keg is permitted by all the devices to have a free rotatable movement, which is Very desirable. When the said holding arm 26 is arranged against the end of a barrel or keg, the flat links 24 are positioned as shown in Fig.2, the joints of said links being so constructed as to prevent them from being thrown forward beyond a predetermined point and the rearmost link from being depressed below the horizontal plane of the next link to which it is attached.

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