Beer In Ads #1340: Saturday Afternoon At Sportsman’s Park


Saturday’s ad is another one from the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, from 1945. This was the year before the “Beer Belongs” series began. These were similar, and used the “Beer Belongs” tagline, but were unnumbered stand-alones. They each featured a painting by a well-known artist or illustrator of the day, along with many of the elements that would later appear in the “Home Life in America” series. In this ad, the painting is called “Saturday Afternoon at Sportsman’s Park,” by artist Edward Laning. Seemed like the perfect ad after the Giant’s victory in game 1 today, plus it is Saturday, of course.

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And here’s a close up of Laning’s artwork.

SaturdayAfternoon at Sportsman's Park by Edward Laning, close-up of artwork

Beer Shower at the World Series

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This was too funny not to share. Today, October 2, in 1959, during the World Series between the Chicago White Sox and the Los Angeles Dodgers, White Sox left fielder Al Smith had something of an unpleasant time. In the fifth inning, an excited fan in the outfield leapt to his feet, and in the process accidentally knocked over the beer that had been resting on the top of the outfield wall.

The spilled beer and cup rained down on Smith, hitting him square on the head, and dousing him pretty thoroughly. At first he thought it was intentional, but the field umpire assured him it had been accidental. After the game, they learned that the fan was “Melvin Piehl, a motor oil company executive, who later stated that he was trying to catch the ball so it would not hit his boss’s wife.” The White Sox went on to lose this second game at Comiskey Park, and ultimately the Dodgers won the 1959 series, four games to two. Luckily, Ray Gora of the Chicago Tribune snapped a picture at precisely the right moment and captured a piece of history.

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Beer In Ads #1255: 7th Inning Schlitzstretch


Thursday’s ad is for Schlitz, from 1957. Given we’re in the middle of the all-star break, I figured a “7th Inning Schlitzerstretch” might be in order. It’s subtitled “How Cheering Raises A Schlitzthirst.” I confess I love the Schlitzerland ad campaign, especially the illustrations. “Be a Schlitzer.” Wouldn’t you like to be a Schlitzer, too?

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Beer In Ads #1154: Double Header


Monday’s ad is for Pabst, from some time in the 1940s, based on the suit the men are wearing at a baseball game. Apparently if you drink Pabst, and more importantly, bring some home for your wife, you’ll get out of the doghouse and she’ll forget all about being late because you went to a baseball double header. Too bad real life doesn’t work that way.

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Beer In Ads #1153: Remember The Time We Taught Mary How To Bat?


Sunday’s ad is by the United Brewers Industrial Foundation, from 194. It was part of their award-winning “Morale is a Lot of Little Things” campaign. This one, “Remember The Time We Taught Mary How To Bat?,” seems a bit insensitive by today’s standards, but was attempting, at least, to remind people why we were fighting World War 2, with the aim of building up morale both at home and in the various theatres of war.

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Beer In Ads #1151: Roberto Clemente For Ballantine


Friday’s ad is for Ballantine, from around 1950. The ad features Pittsburgh Pirate right fielder Roberto Clemente, so it must have been before 1973, since Clemente died in a plane crash while delivering aid to victims of an earthquake in Nicaragua on December 31, 1972. I still have one of his baseball cards from when I was a kid. If I had to guess, I’d say the ad is not an ad per se, but more likely was part of a baseball program sold at the stadium, except that at second glance the text is in Spanish, saying “Roberto Clemente at bat for Ballantine beer.”

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Beer In Ads #1150: Your Baseball Broadcasting & Telecasting Host


Thursday’s ad is for Narragansett, from 1950. The black and white ad shows a woman staring back at the viewer, with a baseball game on the television behind her. The scene on television almost looks the same as the billboard from yesterday, with a player sliding into home. The ad also uses their famous “Hi, Neighbor! Have a ‘Gansett” tagline.

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Beer In Ads #1147: Leo Durocher For Rheingold


Monday’s ad is for Rheingold Beer, from 1942. With the opening day of the 2014 baseball season taking place for most teams today (not including the boondoggle to Australia and one game yesterday) I thought this week I’d feature ads with a baseball theme. Today’s ad features Leo “The Lip” Durocher, who at this time was the manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers.

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