Patent No. 998815A: Beer-Making Apparatus

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Today in 1911, US Patent 998815 A was issued, an invention of Ernst Uhlmann, for his “Beer-Making Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to that portion of the beer making art wherein the wort is treated with hops, and it has for its objects to provide an apparatus for preventing the wort from acquiring an objectionable color and flavor and from a tendency to sour as a result of such treatment.

My invention is designed to overcome these objections and to provide a form of apparatus for rapidly removing the hops from the wort, which shall ‘be simple in construction and operation and require much less floor space for accommodation than apparatus commonly used for the purpose.

In carrying out my invention I remove the hops, albuminoids, and such matter from the wort while the latter is flowing from the brewing kettle to the coolers, so that the wort is freed from these matters almost immediately it leaves the brewing kettle, and does not remain in contact with the hops, etc., longer than a few seconds. Also I remove all the wort from the hops without employment of any mechanical or air pressure.

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Patent No. 1234255A: Process Of Treating Beer

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Today in 1917, US Patent 1234255 A was issued, an invention of Charles S. Ash, for his “Process of Treating Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to a process of treating beer; and has for its object to stabilize beer by eliminating the causes of cloudiness and turbidity therein, and also to prevent the development of color and the development of a cooked taste in the beer following pasteurization.

In the brewing and finishing of beer, the aim of the brewer is to obtain a product which is brilliantly clear and transparent and which will so remain under all conditions of subsequent handling.

Beer is rendered turbid or cloudy on standing, particularly in the cold, by reason of the precipitation of nitrogenous bodies. In the process of mashing the grains and making the wort, which is subsequently fermented, a portion of the nitrogenous bodies of the grain is brought into solution. After the fermentation and the aging or lagering to which the new beer is subjected some of these nitrogenous bodies are precipitated and are removed by filtration. After the final filtration the beer is brilliant, but upon storage in the case of keg beer, and upon pasteurization and storage in the case of bottled beer, the beer gradually becomes cloudy and finally turbid.

There are two ways in which this cloudiness and turbidity can be prevented; first, by the absolute removal-of the nitrogenous bodies still held in the lagered beer, which are susceptible to subsequent precipitation through storage or heating or cooling; and, second, by treating the lagered beer in such a manner that these, nitrogenous bodies remain in solution. The first method has never been hitherto successfully accomplished. The second method has yielded results of more or less value and is accomplished by adding to the beer substances known as enzymes, which have the power of rendering these insoluble nitrogenous bodies soluble and hence the beer remains brilliant.

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Two beers with the same color, but different turbidity.

Patent No. 193371A: Improvement In Pumping Apparatus For Raising Beer

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Today in 1877, US Patent 193371 A was issued, an invention of Clement Labuethe, for his “Improvement in Pumping Apparatus for Raising Wine, Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My improved apparatus consists of a special construction and combination of devices, hereinafter described, for transmitting liquids from one cask or vessel to another, and of delivering it for use.

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Patent No. 302282A: Apparatus For Racking Beer

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Today in 1884, US Patent 302282 A was issued, an invention of Johann Pusch, for his “Apparatus for Racking Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to an improved hermetic apparatus for racking beer, and is designed as an improvement on the apparatus described in Letters Patent No. 274,516, granted to me March 27, 1883.

As in the apparatus described in the above, named Letters Patent, the object of this invention is to effectually prevent the escape of the carbonic-acid gas contained in the beer during the process of racking; and the improvements herewith made consist, first, in the novel means employed in connection with the barrel-platform for raising and lowering the same; second, in the novel means for clearing the supply-pipes of all beer after the barrel is filled, and, third, in the novel bung-feeding mechanism, all as will be fully described and claimed.

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Patent No. 734305A: Process Of Preserving Beer

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Today in 1903, US Patent 734305 A was issued, an invention of Francisque Crotte, for his “Process Of Preserving Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates to, the preservation of beer or other liquids; and the object of the invention is to provide a process by which the organic or germ life in the beer is rendered harmless, so that the beer will keep without deterioration for a great length of time.

The invention consists of the process of preserving beer which comprises the steps of placing a suitable preservative substance in a receptacle in contact with the beer to be treated and then passing through said substance, receptacle, and the beer an electric current of high tension, said current being of such direction, strength, tension,and character as to induce a cataphoric transference of said preservative substance through the receptacle into the beer.

The invention consists also in certain other combinations of steps hereinafter described and claimed, all however, involving the same principle of cataphoric action.

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Patent No. 2354093A: Brewing Apparatus

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Today in 1944, US Patent 2354093 A was issued, an invention of Berthold Stein, for his “Brewing Apparatus.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The present invention relates to brewing apparatus, more especially adapted for the achievement of certain improvements in the art of brewing beer, ale, near beer, or the like, with the principal object of making a more palatable and stable malt liquor, because a decided need exists for such improvement, inasmuch as a great many people do not. like to drink the present malt liquor of such general class particularly because of the unpalatable taste or odor.

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Also, today in the same year, US Patent 2354092 A was issued, another invention of Berthold Stein, for his “Art of brewing beer, ale, or near-beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The present invention relates to certain improvements in the art of brewing beer, ale, near beer, or the like, with the principal object of making a more palatable and stable malt liquor, because a decided need exists for such improvement, inasmuch as a great many people do not like to drink the present malt liquor of such general class particularly because of the taste unpalatable or odor.

The drawing file with this patent looks virtually identical to the other one, too.
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Patent No. 3746550A: Method Of Continuous Mashing

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Today in 1973, US Patent 3746550 A was issued, an invention of Lars Karl Johan Ehnstrom, for his “Method of Continuous Mashing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The present invention relates to a method of continuous mashing in connection with micro-biological processes, where the mash is heated to a predetermined temperature which is intended to be maintained uniformly when the mash passes through a mashing stage in which enzymatic reactions take place.

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Patent No. 5648246A: Process For The Continuous Preparation Of Wort

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Today in 1997, US Patent 5648246 A was issued, an invention of Christiaan Willem Versteegh, assigned to Heineken Technical Services B.V., for his “Process For The Continuous Preparation Of Wort.” Here’s the Abstract:

This invention relates to a process for the continuous preparation of wort, including the continuous enzymatic conversion of malt in one rotating disc contactor and separation of spent grain from mash in a separation unit. Further, a process for the continuous preparation of wort, including the continuous gelatinization and enzymatic liquefaction of a mixture based on unmalted grain, malt and/or an enzyme source and water in a rotating disc contactor, addition of malt and/or enzyme source to the product obtained, enzymatic conversion of the product obtained and separation of the spent grain from the mash in a separation unit.

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Patent No. 4212950A: Fermenting Apparatus

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Today in 1980, US Patent 4212950 A was issued, an invention of Robert P. Adams, assigned to The Virtis Company, Inc., for his “Fermenting Apparatus.” Here’s the Abstract:

Apparatus providing for the growth of cells in a nutrient bath under controlled conditions includes a pressure vessel with a surrounding dimpled jacket. The pressure vessel is adjustably mounted on three vertical mounting columns, from which it is thermally isolated. Temperature control for the pressure vessel is achieved by a closed heat transfer system which includes a pair of heat exchanger sections in series, one for heating and one for cooling the heat transfer fluid. A removable head or lid for the pressure vessel is lifted by three cables running through a common pulley mounted above the pressure vessel. Impeller blades for agitating the contents of the fermenting apparatus have a drive shaft that extends through the head and is connected to a gear box by a removable driving link. The gear box, and an associated drive motor, are affixed to a common mounting bracket that is pivotable to permit maximum displacement of the head.

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Patent No. 765112A: Beer-Cooler Tank

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Today in 1904, US Patent 765112 A was issued, an invention of Robert Surry Valentine, for his “Beer-Cooler Tank.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of the invention is to provide a construction of tank of the type referred to which will admit of the thorough cleansing thereof with facility; and to this end the invention includes the combination and arrangement of parts to be hereinafter described, and particularly pointed out in the claims.

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