Patent No. 3327612A: Apparatus For Use In Brewing

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Today in 1967, US Patent 3327612 A was issued, an invention of Conrad Lenz, for his “Apparatus for Use in Brewing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

This invention relates, in general, to brewing apparatus and, in particular, to a new and useful mashing device comprising a unit consisting of a tank for receiving the soaked malt, a feed grinder for the soaked malt and a conveyor for moving the crushed material from the outlet of the feed grinder to a brewing pan or mash copper and of means actuated by the emptying of the unit of the mashed material to discontinue the driving mechanisms.

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Patent No. 2163468A: Process For Making Hopped Beer Wort

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Today in 1939, US Patent 2163468 A was issued, an invention of Carl Rach, for his “Process For Making Hopped Beer Wort.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

Heretofore in the process of making this wort, unmalted cereals (such as corn grits or rice) were mixed with malt (such as malt barley or wheat malt) and were cooked with water at a temperature around the boiling point in a large container or cooker, the resulting mixture being led from the cooker into a mash tub where it was mixed with a malt mash and kept for onehalf hour or more at mashing off temperature. The wort which resulted from this .last mashing operation was strained through the undissolved grains of the material or mash resting upon a false bottom, with which the mash tub is provided. During this operation the undissolved grains on the false bottom served as a filter mass. The usual practice in the next stage of the old process was to wash the grains by pouring hot water upon them in the mash tub to remove the remaining wort extract. This washing of the grains or sparging operation, as commonly called, resulted in a wort which was of much lower As the sparging operations continued the resulting worts were of less and less density and after they were all collected together in a large kettle they had to be boiled to evaporate some of the water and increase the density to the desired degree, which is between 12 to 13% as measured by the Bailing saccharometer.

This evaporation and concentration of the wort was disadvantageous in that it required time, labor and fuel and thus increased the cost of the beer.

Thus it is an object of my invention to provide a process which eliminates the necessity of boiling the wort to concentrate it, and thus (1) to reduce the expense of the process, and (2) to permit greater control of the composition and chemical nature of the product, by reason of boiling being carried on only to chemically affect the wort and not to evaporate water.

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Patent No. 7735413B2: Method And Device For Brewing Beer

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Today in 2010, US Patent 7735413 B2 was issued, an invention of Klaus-Karl Wasmuht and Kurt Stippler, assigned to Krones AG, for their “Method And Device For Brewing Beer.” Here’s the Abstract:

A device for brewing beer, particularly a wort pan (1), with a container body (2) to receive a wort reservoir (3), the device containing an internal boiler (4) arranged in the container body (2), which is provided with a heat exchanger (5) and a guiding screen (8). A wort forced flow (10) provided with a pump is also provided, which runs through the boiler (4). In order to increase the efficiency of the device, the wort forced flow (10) has a thin-layer distributor (17) for the wort, which contains a pipe subsection (11 b) connected with the pump, which subsection leads above the guiding screen (8) via an outlet opening (13) with reduced outlet cross-section into the container body (2). Above the outlet opening (13), a flow-guiding baffle surface (15) is provided, at which the flow arrives from below, to deflect the liquid towards the wort reservoir (3).

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Patent No. 3585045A: Method For Preparing Beer Wort

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Today in 1971, US Patent 3585045 A was issued, an invention of Conrad Lenz, for his “Method For Preparing Beer Wort.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

According to the method of this invention, a first portion of the continuously prepared mash is transferred from a mash-making zone to a first vessel. A subsequent portion of the mash is transferred from the mash-making zone to a second vessel while the first portion is being heated in the first vessel, and the two portions are then combined, whereupon further heating may follow conventional practice of separating a portion of the mixture from the bulk of the same, heating the separated portion, returning the heated portion to the bulk of the mixture, and repeating such separating, heating, and returning until the mixture reaches the desired temperature. The plant employed in performing the method is provided with a two-way valve in the mash transfer conduit which connects the mash-making apparatus with the mash heating or brewing apparatus. Two branch conduits lead from the valve to two vessels of the mash-heating apparatus, at least one vessel being provided with heating means. The valve may be moved in the usual manner between two positions in which it connects the mash transfer conduit with the branch conduits respectively while blocking the other branch conduit.

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Patent No. 995001A: Agitating Device

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Today in 1911, US Patent 995001 A was issued, an invention of John H. Hathaway, for his “Agitating Device.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

The object of my invention is the provision of a device of the character mentioned which will be so designed as to adapt the same to be readily arranged in a paint-keg, upon the removal of one of the heads of the latter, in such a manner as to permit of the ready manual oscillation thereof therein, in effecting the thorough breaking of the lead or oil contained in the keg.

A further object is the provision of an agitating device as mentioned which will be of an adjustable nature adapting the same for arrangement in kegs of various dimensions; and further a device which will be effectual in operation, and which will be of strong, durable and economical construction.

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Patent No. 651651A: Apparatus For Racking Beer

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Today in 1900, US Patent 651651 A was issued, an invention of Harry W. Colby, for his “Apparatus For Racking Beer.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it includes this summary:

My invention relates to improvements in apparatus for racking beer, and more particularly to improvements upon the invention or apparatus shown and described in my pending application, Serial No; 616,386, filed December 21, 1896. In the invention and apparatus of my said pending application the beer was forced from the tank into the barrel under pressure, the barrel itself being first filled with air or gas under pressure approximating that of the tank, and the necessary difference of pressure to cause the liquid to flow from the tank into the barrel was maintained by a spring or weight actuated safety valve controlling the vent through which the air or gas escaped from the barrel into the outer air as the barrel filled with the beer. In the practical use of this apparatus I have found difficulty in keeping the safety-valve or its weight or spring so nicely adjusted as to entirely prevent foaming of the beer, especially as the pressure in the tank itself is liable to variation as the liquid is drawn therefrom.

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Patent No. 3888839A: Isolated Yeast Protein Product With Intact RNA And A Process For Making Same

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Today in 1975, US Patent 3888839 A was issued, an invention of Jon Albert Newell, Robert Dudley Seeley, and Ernest Aleck Robbins, assigned to Anheuser Busch, for their “Isolated Yeast Protein Product with Intact RNA and a Process for Making Same.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it states that “We have discovered a process for obtaining a protein isolate from yeast cells. This process makes use of a neutral or slightly alkaline extraction of disintegrated cells to avoid the deleterious effect on nutritional quality and flavor.”

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Our process is comprised of the following steps: production of yeast cells, rupture of the cells, separation of the insoluble cell wall fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction, treatment of the soluble fraction with alkali, recovery of the protein by precipitation and centrifugation, vacuum concentration, and drying. The substantially cell free isolated protein product contains about 40% of the solids, -65% of the protein, 60-65% of the nucleic acid, 64-68% of the lipid and less than 5% of the carbohydrate that was present in the yeast cell. The isolated protein product has the composition (dsb) of 65-85% crude protein, 9-14% nucleic acid, 2-8% ash, 9-14% lipid, and 2-10% carbohydrate, while including less than 1% crude fiber.

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Patent No. 730651A: Brewing

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Today in 1903, US Patent 730651 A was issued, an invention of Herbert Amos Hobson, assigned to the Concentrated Beer Company Ltd., for his “Brewing.” There’s no Abstract, although in the description it states that “this invention relates to a method of brewing in which a hopped wort is produced by first making an infusion or decoction of hops, then running off the infusion or decoction, and after fixing the tannic acid extracted from the hops mashing malt (or malt and grain) in the hop infusion or decoction as the mashing liquor.” Hobson was a British analytical chemist, and obviously he didn’t patent “brewing,” but an improvement on the process. I use the same titles that the grant of application uses, but sometimes they’re a little strange, case in point this one. Anyway, Hobson goes on to describe it great detail:

The invention consists,first, in a methodical process whereby the residual soluble matter contained in the spent malt and spent hops is extracted, the liquor containing such residual extractive matter being used instead of plain water for making the decoction of hops for a fresh brew, so that the residual malt and hop extract obtained from the spent malt and hops left from one brew will be utilized in the next succeeding brew, and so on.

The invention consists, secondly, in withdrawing from the hop extract (after it has been treated to fix the tannic acid, but before it is used for mashing) a portion of the hop liquor, separately heating the liquor thus withdrawn, and returning it to the bulk of the liquor after the mashing of the latter with malt, (or malt and grain,) so as to thereby raise the temperature of the mash without causing dilution thereof, as would be the case were naked steam blown in.

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Patent No. 20488A: Apparatus For Manufacture Of Beer

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Today in 1858, US Patent 20488 A was issued, an invention of George Habioh, for his “Apparatus For Manufacture Of Beer.” There’s no Abstract, though the description in the application states that he’s “invented an Improved Apparatus for Brewing or Manufacturing Beer.” What follows is a very lengthy explanation, but here’s the start of a fuller explanation.

For this boiling of the wort I use a closed copper or kettle; its steam I employ for new mashing and increase its pressure by a superincumbent column of water. This steam enters directly into the mash, and the increasing height of the water increases also the boiling point of the wort contained in the copper. This increased temperature manifests itself in stirring up again the wort, after it becomes clear, and finally the wort clears itself of all the coagulated albumen. The only thing to be observed is that the temperature should be sufficiently high, 2′. e. the steam pipe must be closed by a sufficient column of water.

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Patent No. 2472252A: Process For The Preservation Of Beer

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Today in 1949, US Patent 2472252A was issued, an invention of Arthur Henry Hughes, assigned to Messrs. Arthur Guinness Son and Company Limited, for his “Process For The Preservation Of Beer.” There’s no Abstract, though the description in the application states that he’s invented “invention relates to the preservation of beer, which term as used herein includes both ale and stout,” apparently by adding “0.041% by volume of hen egg-whites.”

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